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Full text of "The College Forum: Lebanon Valley College Publication (Fall 1893)"

Volume VI. 



Number 7. 



THE 



College Forum. 



SEPTEMBER, 1893. 



. CONTENTS: * . 



di torials 33.35 

Good of a College Education .... 35, 36 

ur New Teacher 36 

Farewell Service 36 

-Women in Colleges 36, 37 

Higher Education of Women 37-39 

Honored 39 

Gift for the Museum 39 

vollege Directory 40 

-lokosmian Literary Society 40 



Our Alumni 40 41 

Personals and Locals 41 

For Ambitious Boys 41 

Wedded in Elizabethtown 43 

The Mighty Dollar 42 

College Day Collections 43 

Bible Study 43 

The Analytical and Psychological in Teach- 

™S 43-46 

Advertisements 47, 48 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE, 
ANNVILLE, PA. 



MOOR'S CAFE, 115 AND 117 NORTH NINTH STREET, LEBANON, PA. 



HARRY LIGHT, 

BOOKS AND STATIONERY, 

22 EAST MAIN ST., ANNVILLE, PA. 



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Our shelves are constantly filled with 
New, Second-Hand and Shelf-Worn 



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Together with a Complete Assortment of 



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3 



STATIONERY, 

Wall Paper and Window Shades, a 



A Selected Stock of the 

LATEST STYLES OF WALL PAPER 

ANT) 

DECORATIONS. 



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SCHOOL AND COLLEGE TEXT BOOKS A SPECIALTY. 
O. SMITH, 



ANNVILLE, PA. 



HEADQUARTERS FOR 



INCLUDING 
NORMAL DEPARTMENT. 
OLD BOOKS. NEW BOOKS. 

Cheapest place in the Lebanon Valley to buy your 
Books. New and Old Hooks Bought, 
Sold and Exchanged. 

WATCHES, CLOCKS AND JEWELRY, 

SILVER PLATED WARE, 

Spectacles a Specialty. Fittecl «, a it'c! n Gold ' 

PERFECT FOCUS AND FIT GUARANTEED. 



ISAAC WOLF, 

'S LEADING 

ONE PRICE ONLY . 

SATISFACTION GUARANTEED. 

82S CUMBERLAND STREET. 



0> MAKKET ST., AT THE RIVER BRIDGE, 

HARRISBURG, 3? A. 

CARPETS, OIL CLOTHS, ETC. 




"X.** »**.^»* 

Always sold at the Lowest Cash Prices. All Goods 
Guaranteed to be as represented. Rag and Ingrain 
Carpets 25 cents per yard up. Floor and Table Oil 
Cloths 25 cents per yard up. 

FRED. W. YINGST, on Market St, at the Bridge. 

BOOKS! BOOKS! BOOKS! 



When you need Books or Stationery of any kind 
correspond with or call on us. By so doing you will 
secure the Best Goods at the most Favorable Prices. 

Stock always New and Fresh. Assortment Large. 
Prices the Lowest. Whether you intend to buy 25& 
or $25.00 worth, it will pay you to call to see us. 

Bagster's and Oxford Teachers' Bibles a Specialty. 
We carry iii stock the publications of the L T . B. 
Publishing House, such as Otterbein Hymnals, 
Hymns of the Sanctuary, the Books used in tbe 
three years' course of study, S. S. Music Books. 

AGENTS WANTED to sell the best and most 
popular Lord's Prayer published. Send 75 cents for 
sample copy, worth $2.00. Address plainly 

ORDER & BROTHER, 

PUBLISHERS OF 

Photograph MarriageCertil 

Photograph Family Records, Etc., Etc., 

YORK, PA. 



PZiEA.SE MENTION "THE COLLEGE FORUM.' 



B. P. WYNINGS, FlOrist, Roses, Carnatfems arul^Cut Flowers 

Successor to Wynings & Dace, 121 North 9th St., Lebanon, Pa. Bulbs and Hardy Plants in season- 



THE COLLEGE EOEUM. 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 

Vol. VI. No. 7. ANNVILLE, PA., SEPTEMBER, 1893. Whole No. 63. 



EDITORS. 

H. CLAY DEANEK, A. M., 
Editor-in-Cliief and Publisher. 



SOCIETY EDITORS. 
Clionian Society— Miss Maggie Strickler, '94. 
Philokosmian Society— Oscar E. Good, '94. 
Kalozetean Society — G. A. L. Kindt, '94. 



ASSOCIATE EDITORS. 
John H. Matsilles, '95. D. s. Eshelman, '94. 

William H. Kreider, '94. 



All communications or items of news should be sent to 
the Editor in Chief. Subscriptions should he sent to the 
Publishing Agent. 

THE COLLEGE FORUM will be sent monthly for one 
Mhool year on receipt of twenty-flve cents. Subscriptions 
received at any time. 

For terms of advertising, address the Publisher. 

Entered at the Post Office at Annville, Pa., as 
second-class mail matter. 



Efcttortal. 



Welcome to the new students. 



Arrangements have been made to have 
special Bible work under the direction of 
the Y. W. C. A., and Y. M. C. A. 



The lecture course for the winter prom- 
ises to be one of unusual interest. The 
Went is not all secured, so the announce- 
ment can not be made till our next issue. 



A class in the Bible Normal Union has 
been organized. Since the organization 
°f the work in the College, in 1887, fifty- 
ei ght ladies and gentlemen have completed 
toe course. 



have heard so many reasons given 
for the depression of business that it 
w °ukl cause a feeling of relief if some of 
toe wise (?) Senators would attempt a solu- 



tion, instead of thwarting the will of their 
constituents by their braying. 

The Lincoln monument, unveiled in 
Edinburgh, August 21, ult., in memory 
of Scottish-American soldiers, and sub- 
scribed for by American citizens, pri- 
marily through the instrumentality of Hon 
Wallace Bruce, is a fitting tribute of Ameri- 
can liberality and fraternal good will. 



Rush and hurrah are no indications of 
greatness. The lazy man never succeeds. 
Because of the mere fact of his being lazy, 
there is no personal effort, and he always 
waits for something to turn up, instead of 
turning up something. To think that fits 
and starts, first this and then that, will 
make a scholar, a business man, or give 
eminence, one would do well to recall the 
story of the tortoise and the hare. Work, 
thought and persistance, will bring suc- 
cess, if success is ever to be yours. 

The three leading signs of the return to 
prosperity or rather public confidence, 
are that banks are discounting paper as 
formerly and gold is flowing into the 
treasury, that of reviving industry and 
improved financial condition throughout 
the country, and lastly that of travel. 

When the panic was the greatest, trunk 
lines were almost deserted, and even trains 
which for years were run with profit had 
to be taken off. If the action of the House 
in passing the repeal of the silver purchase 
act, has done so much to restore public 
confidence and start the wheels of industry 
and to restore the trains that were with- 
drawn, what might we expect if the Senate 
would cease school boy " says" and vote ? 



34 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



The opening of our Fall term this year 
was attended with a great deal of interest. 
The number of new students, notwith- 
standing the stringency of the times, being 
larger than usual. This is no doubt largely 
due to the fact that earnest canvassing was 
done during the past vacation. The Presi- 
dent visited nearly all the camp meetings 
held in Eastern Pennsylvania, under the 
auspices of the United Brethren church 
and publicly talked on the subject of Col- 
lege work and education at six of these 
meetings. At some of them he was as- 
sisted by associate professors and gradu- 
ates of the institution. 

The devotional exercises held on Tues- 
da} r morning were conducted b}' President 
Bierman, who, after the singing of an ap- 
propriate hymn, read a part of the fifth 
chapter of the gospel by Matthew, and 
offered an earnest prayer, invoking God's 
blessing upon teacher, student, the work 
and the College. 

This was followed by a brief address of 
welcome, advice and congratulation. Wel- 
come to these halls of learning, to the 
elevating influences of college life and its 
associations and to the professors' instruc- 
tion. Advice to lay aside all other inter- 
ests and do the work of a student, to 
choose the best associate and labor to 
benefit him and be benefitted by him and 
above all to seek and to know God. Con- 
gratulation to the student, in being per- 
mitted to be a sharer of these privileges 
and to be honored with the enrollment of 
his name in the College register. The 
address was well received. 

Since the opening, the work has been 
moving on pleasantly and new names are 
being enrolled weekly. The attendance of 
students for this term promises to be fully 
as good as last year. 



In a suggestive address recently de- 
livered before the literary societies of one 
of our neighboring colleges, extracts of 
which are found on another page of the 
Forum, Judge Gordon presents an aspect 



of the use and value of the higher educa- 
tion of women, too often overlooked and 
indeed too much forgotten. 

In regard to such an education, as he 
truthfully says, the assumption is that it 
is intended to fit women for those occu- 
pations and pursuits usually followed by 
men. 

Many of these are practically closed to 
the entrance of an}- large number of women, 
and in the home life a woman is as a usual 
thing made to feel that her education and 
training has largely left her with desires, 
ambitions and aspirations which she can- 
not gratify. 

Too many women awake to the fact that 
after having acquired the round of knowl- 
edge, presented in a liberal course, their 
education is without direct use. The 
learned judge, however, very forcibly 
points out the fact that nothing could be 
less true. 

The social condition of men and women 
is what women choose to make it. A 
woman, particularly a young woman, can 
always command from men about her, the 
manner, the intellectual interest and atti- 
tude she chooses to demand. If she in- 
sists upon it, society will call for a higher 
intellectual life. What is true of the social 
contact of men and women, is also true of 
the whole framework of society. Educated 
women can transform it if they but address 
themselves to it. The cure for many of 
the evils of our day is in woman's own 
hands, and a 3 r oung lady can put her edu- 
cation to no better use than to carry it 
fearlessly into societ}', and demand for it 
there a recognition of its worth accord- 
ing to the same criterion by which men 
recognize the same attainments among 
each other. A single educated woman 
began some years ago to agitate in due 
time, organized and secured effective legis- 
lation to give to the great city of New 
York its present street cleaning act. ur 
country is full of problems and reforms m 
sanitation, education, charity and multi- 
plied other interests, which call loudly f° r 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



35 



solution, and offer a field for usefulness 
and operation to the trained and educated 
women of to-day. We confidently believe 
that if our educated women will seriously 
set themselves to work, the many sug 
gested, practical reforms in the judge's 
interesting address may be satisfactorily 
solved. The extensive experience in pub 
lie affairs and on the bench renders Judge 
Gordon's address a valuable contribution 
to the discussion of this important prob- 
lem — the higher education of women. 



The Good of a College Education. 

The young man who is trying to decide 
whether it is better for him to give four 
years of his early life to obtaining a col- 
lege training will doubtless get a variety 
of opinions, from those he consults, on 
both sides of the question. Those who 
wish to discourage him will point to the 
great number of men who have achieved 
a larger or smaller degree of success in 
their different callings without having 
gone to college, while those who would 
bring him to an affirmative decision will 
dilate on the mental discipline and train- 
ing he will get from a four years' course 
of study. But what will be of much 
more service to the young man is to have 
it demonstrated whether a college educa- 
tion will add to his chances of winning 
success in whatever career he may choose. 

In deciding this important question 
some pertinent information was given in 
a recent article in the Forum on " College 
men first among successful citizens." A 
Cyclopaedia of American Biography con- 
taining the biographies of 15,142 persons 
was made the basis of the test, on the 
ground that "the book is supposed to 
represent the most conspicuous 15,000 
persons of American history." So the 
percentage of college-bred men among 
those who have been thought worthy of 
a place in this biography when compared 
w ith the percentage which the number of 
j&en who have gained the same distinc- 
«on bears to all those who have not been 
j° college will give a very fair showing of 
flow much a college education helps a 
in life. It was found that of the 
°'142 persons mentioned in the biog- 
j^Pbical cyclopaedia 5326 are college 
bre d, or a little over one-third. The 
^mber of people who have lived in this 



countiy since its settlement by white 
men is placed at 100,200,000 and the 
number of college graduates at 200,000. 
It is evident then that of the 100,000,000 
who have not been to college only 9816 
have achieved distinction, while of the 
200,000 who have been to college 5326 
have become eminent. 

Any schoolboy can work out that 
"sum." It simply proves that while 
among men not college-bred one person 
in 10,000 has a chance of achieving such 
success in his life's career as will entitle 
him to a place in a collection of biog- 
raphies of eminent persons, one man in 
everj- forty among the college-bred has 
the same chance. So the relation which 
forty bears to 10,000 seems to measure 
the help a college education gives a man 
in winning success in life. This can be 
shown in another way. Business is sup- 
posed to be the calling in which success 
depends the least upon a college training. 
And yet of the successful business men 
mentioned in the biographical cyclopaedia 
17 per cent, were college bred. There is 
no means of knowing the whole number 
of business men, but he would be a rash 
statistician who should claim that It per 
cent, of those not college-bred have 
achieved the same success. 

A college education cannot supply what 
is lacking. It simply develops what is 
present. The basis, the groundwork, 
must be there, and a collegiate training 
can only help to draw it out. This is 
why so large a proportion of men without 
the discipline a college gives have been 
able to win success in life. They had the 
talent, and the discipline of practical life 
developed them. But their success came 
later and their usefulness was more re- 
stricted than it would have been if they 
had had the advantage of a thorough 
college training. Force is added to the 
argument in favor of a college education 
when the newness of the country is con- 
sidered as well as the great amount of 
pioneer work that had to be done. Young 
men had to begin the practical duties of 
life early. The transit from the public 
school to the farm, the counting room, 
the lawyer's office, has been an indispensa- 
bly brief one. In this view of the subject 
it is a matter for wonder that so large a 
percentage of eminent Americans were 
college-bred. 

But as the country grows older and the 
demand for better equipped men becomes 



36 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



stronger the percentage of men bred in 
college among those considered worthy of 
a place in a biographical cyclopaedia will 
rapidly increase. If such a work is com- 
piled at the end of the next fifty years and 
it includes the men who have achieved 
distinction during that time it will prob- 
ably be found that 80 per cent, of the 
clergymen, instead of 58 per cent., as now, 
are college bred, 70 per cent, of the 
lawyers instead of 50 per cent., 60 per 
cent, of statesmen instead of 33 per cent., 
65 per cent, of authors instead of 37 per 
cent., and 70 per cent, of journalists 
instead of 30 per cent., as now, are college- 
bred. These facts may help a young man 
in doubt about deciding whether it is his 
duty to himself to take a college educa- 
tion. 

Our New Teacher. 

The Annville Journal speaks thus of 
the new addition to the Faculty of the 
College : 

" We are pleased to state that the au- 
thorities of the College have added a new 
teacher to the Faculty to take the place of 
Miss Dittmar in the person of Miss Ger- 
trude Albertson of Atlantic City, New 
Jersey. 

" Miss Albertson comes with the highest 
testimonials for competency in her work. 
After graduating in a literary and musical 
course, in one of.our Eastern schools, she 
took post-graduate work in Music, Art and 
Elocution under private tutors in the Na- 
tional Academy of Design, the Cooper 
Union Institute, and the Art Students' 
League in New York City. 

" With these equipments and an experi- 
ence of four years as instructor we be- 
speak for Miss Albertson a brilliant suc- 
cess here and congratulate our friends of 
the College upon their wisdom in selecting 
one so eminently fitted for the position." 



Farewell Service. 

Interesting Event in the U. B. Sabbath School. 

In connection with the Sunday School 
session of the Second TJ. B. Sabbath School 
yesterday afternoon, a farewell service 
was held, in recognition of the departure 
of three of the young people of the Second 
U. B. Church, to enter upon a college 
coarse at Lebanon Valley College, Ann- 
ville, Pa. These young people are Miss 
Carrie Klinedinst and Miss Mellie Forten- 
baugh, who intends entering upon a course 
of music and voice culture ; and Mr. Wil- 



liam M. Beattie, who will complete a 
classical course preparatory to entering 
the ministry. These young people are 
worthy members of the above church. 
Miss Klinedinst and Mr. Beattie are mem- 
bers of the Sabbath school. These fare- 
well services consisted of addresses inter- 
spersed with appropriate songs. The 
Superintendent, Mr. Daniel Lehn, spoke of 
the relation of these young people to the 
church and Sabbath school, and especially 
of the character of their service and faith- 
fulness in attending the various services 
of the church. Miss Klinedinst and Mi 
Beattie spoke of the benefits and blessings 
the Sabbath school is to them. The pastor, 
Rev. C. A. Burtner, spoke to the school 
and these young people with respect to the 
importance of the work they were about 
to enter upon and of the necessity of them 
being true to themselves and their Lord. 
After prayer by the pastor, invoking the 
divine blessings upon them and the school 
and the singing of " God be with you till 
we meet again," the services closed. 

Miss Klinedinst led the Young People's 
meeting and read an excellent paper on 
" Why seek knowledge," and Mr. Beattie 
sang a solo. These young people left on 
the 10:52 train to-day, for college, with the 
benedictions and prayers of a host of 
friends to attend them.— York Dispatch. 



Women and Colleges. 

Those who inspect the statistical charts 
and the bound volume of historical and 
educational monograms contributed by 
the women of Massachusetts to the Chi- 
cago Fair will gain a new idea of what 
women have done for the cause of higher 
education. The facts contained will he a 
revelation to most people, who have only 
an inadequate idea of what women have 
accomplished in this way. One of the 
most extraordinary showings is the table 
containing a list of the sums of money 
given to Massachusetts colleges by women- 
It is as follows : — 

Harvard University $1,201,503 98 

Institute of Technology. . . 203,525 OJ 

Williams College 132,071 

Boston University 90,296 

Amherst College ? 9,000 « 

Smith College 411 

Harvard Annex 100,000 

Mt. Holvoke 94 < 52 ° 

Tufts College 155,750 

*Wellesley College 211,000 

♦Combined gifts of Mr. and Mrs. Durant. 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



37 



Here is a total of $2,328,078.18, a muni- 
ficent sum and larger hy many thousands 
than the total gifts made to all the col- 
leges in some of the oldest States. Har- 
vard University received more than half 
of this amount, and yet that institution 
has onty recently admitted young women 
to its courses, and even now does not 
give them the same advantages as } T oung 
men. To President Eliot's request that 
women contribute $500,000 to endow the 
woman's annex of Harvard University it 
might be pertinent to ask why it would 
not be right to use for this purpose a 
part of the $1,200,000 given by women in 
past years to the funds of the university. 
The scholarships, the botanic garden, the 
divinity school, the library and the de- 
partments that have been enriched by this 
bounty of women show how well they can 
discriminate in their gifts. 

This does not include all, however, that 
women have done for education in Massa- 
chusetts. Public libraries have received 
gifts amounting to $681,196, and public 
and industrial sehools have been given 
$122,000. Another way in which educa- 
tion has been aided by women is by gifts 
to the free kindergartens, which have re- 
ceived $344,579. Even this does not 
cover all the money women have given to 
aid others in getting an education, many 
being too modest to allow the amount of 
their gifts to be known, but it is enough 
to show how strong an interest women 
have taken in colleges and education. 
This interest is not of recent origin, 
either. As early as 1664 Bridget Wynds 
gave Harvard College £4, and in 1718 
Mme. Hutchinson gave the same institu- 
tion £10. These sums look small beside 
the recent bequests to Harvard of $220,- 
000 by Mrs. Elizabeth Fogg and $160,925 
by Mrs. Ellen Gurney. But it is the 
spirit and the ability and not the size of 
the donation that measures the value of 
the gift. 

It is a long call from the earliest of 
these expressions of woman's interest in 
education to the present time, when col- 
leges are opening their doors to female 
students and placing them on the same 
level with male students. All have not 
^one this, but some have and the others 
w ill be compelled to follow. The results 
jtf College training for women have more 
^an justified the efforts made, and swept 
Si^ay most of the prejudice that once ex- 
ited against the higher intellectual train- 



ing of women. The New York Sun not 
long ago gave the following illustration 
of what a college-bred woman can do. It 
said : " One college woman in New York, 
wife of a busy physician, does all her 
husband's reading for him, both of current 
literature and medical publications. With 
the trained intelligence peculiar to the 
thoroughly educated woman, she grasps 
the salient points of the articles and in a 
few words gives them to him at dinner or 
in the afternoon drive." 

With such a proof of how a college-bred 
woman can enter into an intelligent part- 
nership with her husband, and the proof 
given in the exhibit at Chicago of the 
liberality of women toward colleges, there 
will be a general agreement that the day 
has passed when the demand for equal 
facilities for the higher education of 
women can be brushed aside as unworthy 
of notice. — The Press. 



Higher Education of Women. 

Judge James G. Gordon, of Philadel- 
phia, in a recent address on the " Higher 
Education of Women," used the following 
sensible words : 

After pointing out that women were 
now receiving an education at many 
points equal to that of men, Judge Gor- 
don showed that under existing conditions 
women thus educated found themselves 
shut out from the wider activities of life 
and shut in to its social and domestic 
life, in which are obstacles, the lingering 
results of centuries of prejudice and in- 
justice, still dominate our laws and social 
customs. These operate in many in- 
stances to destroy the beneficial effect of 
education and are thus used as an argu- 
ment against education itself. Judge 
Gordon fixed the main fault where it be- 
longs — upon false and unjust discrimina- 
tion made against women by existing 
social conditions, but he urged that the 
cure is in the hands of women because 
society is what women make it and con- 
tinued : 

" I know of no better use to which a 
young lady can put her education than to 
carry it fearlessly into society and de- 
mand for it there a recognition of its 
work according to the same criterion by 
which men recognize the same attainments 
among each other. I know the value of 
formal manners. I know how necessary 
they are to smooth the ways and preserve 



38 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



the proprieties of social intercourse be- 
tween the sexes. But formality does not 
require continual insincerity. Oh ! how 
it will sweeten and purify and invigorate 
society when well-educated young women, 
self-reliant, sensible and high minded, de- 
mand that its tone shall be raised to their 
best capacity and not lowered to their 
supposed weaknesses. 

TOO MUCH NONSENSE. 

Why should men be permitted to leave 
off talking sense when they leave the 
company of men, and insist upon talking 
only nonsense or folly to women ? It is 
the fault of the women if they do. If 
that is the sort of treatment she regards 
as adoration she is easily pleased. The 
men will be glad to continue in a line 
which makes so little demand upon their 
own resources. This much at least a 
woman can do : she can direct the course 
and tone and topics of conversation. I 
know it requires some courage to do this. 
It will not be without protest that men 
will surrender such a vantage ground, 
that serves at once as a point for attack 
and a covert for their own defects. The 
resistance, however, will not last long. 
A ladj T commands by her manner and re- 
buffs without bandying words. Having 
once recognized society on the basis that 
she shall be treated as a reasonable being 
and not a vapid popinjay, the woman of 
higher education has won the battle for 
her sex. She has carried the last redoubt 
of opposition. All outstanding questions 
as to the status of her sex will be deter- 
mined in the first instance in the social 
circle. The laws will simply register the 
decrees of society. 

Here is the field for the activity of 
young ladies who like those before me go 
into the world endowed with the high 
privileges and equipped with the advan- 
tages of higher education. 

The exclusion of women from electoral 
privileges and official duties in the Repub- 
lic has resulted in her withdrawal from 
active interest in or intelligent knowledge 
of politics. It is regarded as somewhat 
of a shame for a woman to be interested 
or informed upon such questions. I am 
sorry to say that in this respect her 
severest critics are her own sex. The 
woman of higher education should change 
all this. True, she cannot vote and can- 
not hold office, but theoretically she is 
said to be represented in both these 
functions through her influence upon her 



father, husband, brother and male friends. 
Very well, be it so. Then let her be 
equipped by education for the exercise of 
this influeuce intelligently and wisely. 
Above all, let her exercise it by all means. 

THINGS SHE OUGHT TO KNOW. 

The woman of higher education should 
count the shame to be in not being inter- 
ested in or informed about public affairs. 
How potential for good will be her in- 
fluence if she but have the tact and 
courage to use her equipment of know- 
ledge to its best advantage. Is not her 
competence as great, her honor as high 
and her patriotism as earnest as that of 
the frequenters of the bar-room and of the 
hordes of foreigners who never exercised 
a political privilege in their native land 
and who can neither read nor write, but 
who happen to have the distinction of 
being males ? "Who has greater stake in 
these subjects than woman ? Public 
questions are not determined in this 
country at the ballot box, or in the Leg- 
islature, or in the Cabinets of executives. 
They are settled by public opinion, and 
these others but register its judgment. 
And who makes public opinion ? Who 
has made it in the past and who can make 
it still more largely in the future? 
Woman. The greatest event in the politi- 
cal history of our land, the mightiest ex- 
hibition of moral sentiment this or any 
country has yet seen, is due in a large 
degree to the influence of woman operat- 
ing upon public opinion. The War of the 
Rebellion and the emancipation of the 
slaves was the outgrowth of agitation 
carried on to a great extent by women. 
Read the names of any meeting of the 
early Abolitionists, and see the enormous 
preponderance of that sex. In its initial 
stages the Abolition movement was a 
woman's movement almost exclusively; 
and when laws, judicial decisions, the 
press, the pulpit, wealth and society were 
all on the side of slavery, those who 
brooked odium most bravely, and labored 
most persistently and intelligently against 
all these influences were a band of noble 
women supported by a few notable men. 
And let me say further that the women 
were almost exclusively such as had been 
infected with the virus of higher education 

woman's duty. 
What they accomplished upon the ques- 
tion of slavery their sisters of to-day can 
accomplish upon other public questions- 




THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



39 



It did not demean them, and it will not 
demean these. The question of the ballot 
will take care of itself and will be settled 
in due time, probably a little overdue. 
The duty of woman is to accept her 
present situation as it is, and by the in- 
telligent and full discharge of her duty as 
a molder of public opinion to show her 
fitness for any other responsibility or right 
the public may impose or confer. It re- 
quires often as much courage to defy a 
social custom as the soldier dispLny^s in 
battle. There is inspiration, however, in 
the touch of elbows. Educated young 
women should therefore act in this matter 
with common intent and give each other 
countenance. With the increasing number 
of scholarly young ladies yearly graduated 
from our seminaries, they can if they will 
but use their power soon work a reforma- 
tion in the tone and standards of society 
that will be of inestimable value to woman 
and to the world. It may be true that 
li the hand that rocks the cradle rules the 
world," but it is not by rocking only that 
it rules. The proverb is true, but its cant 
is purely masculine. It is by molding 
manners, stimulating virtue, exalting 
honor, inculcating religion, and sweeten- 
ing and purifying all the springs of life 
and action that she rules. And how can 
she do this in the most effective manner 
except by herself being educated, refined 
and cultivated ? Let her repel, however, 
in the first instance, and always, that hu- 
miliating patronage by which men in so- 
ciety treat her merely as the votary of 
pleasure and the prize of gallantry. 

THE ALL-IMPORTANT QUESTION. 

All the other questions relating to her 
position in the life of the world are depen- 
dent on this and will be settled by it. It 
may seem like a simple solution for prob- 
lems that have for ages been treated as 
difficult, intricate and profund, but in my 
judgment it is the conclusion of the whole 
matter. Her higher education will then 
fee the key that will open to her all doors 
of industry, usefulness and activity — for 
which her natural capacities and increased 
a »d increasing attainments fit her. Neither 
will the subtle graces of her sex be marred 
W the changed conditions. If the charms 
°f beauty and the lovliness of gentle and 
tender womanhood can survive the do- 
mestic drudgery and lowly and ill-requited 
t°il, to which for so long she has been con- 
ned, why will they not withstand like- 
wise all harm from those occupations that 



require intelligence, skill, learning and cul- 
ture ? Is any form of honest labor igno- 
ble ? Is ignorance ever a fit setting for 
beauty, or does it adorn gentleness and 
sympathy. 

And men will everywhere be helped and 
exalted by the enlarged sphere and higher 
development of women. The finer senti- 
ments that ennoble life will be more per- 
petually present where woman is. Power 
will be more gentle ; law more humane ; 
charity will be more widespread ; sympa- 
thy more impartial ; habits will be more 
refined ; conversation more instructive ; 
force will mean less; love will mean more. 
Who shall estimate the benefits of so great 
a change? All the problems that perplex 
statesmen and social reformers seem to me 
trivial compared with this. In the just' 
relation of woman to society and the state 
is involved to my mind the great and fun- 
damental question-for civilization and hu- 
manity. Higher education will solve it, 
if anj^thing human can. 



Honored. 

The gratifying intelligence came to us 
some time ago that Mr. D. Albert Kreider, 
Class of 1892, who spent last year in the 
post-graduate department of Yale Uni- 
versity, New Haven, Conn., and at the 
end of the year won a prize of $100 for 
meritorious work, is now appointed an 
assistant in chemistry in said institution. 
He will assume the duties of this position 
early in October, and at the same time 
continue his post-graduate work. 



A Gift for the Museum. 

Mr. Geo. R. Ross, of Lebanon, recently 
gave his entire herbarium to the College. 
Besides many rare species from adjoining 
counties, Mr. Ross's collection includes 
over five hundred specimens of the flora 
of Lebanon county. The specimens are 
carefully mounted and are in a good state 
of preservation. The gift is one of much 
value and speaks well for its careful and 
enthusiastic collector. 



The new president of the Sabbath School 
Board of our church, Ex-President 0. J. 
Kephart, resides at Lebanon, Pa. It 
would make him rejoice if at ever}^ charge 
in his conference there would be a class 
in Bible Normal Union. Can it not be 
done ? 




40 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



College Directory. 
Faculty. 

E. BENJ. BIERMAN, A. M., Ph. D., 

PRESIDENT, 

Professor of Mental and Moral Science. 
H. CLAY DEANER, A. M., 
Professor of the Latin Language. 
JOHN E. LEHMAN, A. M., 
Professor of Mathematics. 
Rev. JNO. A. McDERMAD, A. M., 
Professor of the Greek Language. 
JOHN A. SHOTT, Ph. B., 
Professor of Natural Science. 
MARY E. SLEICHTER, A. B., 
Professor of English Literature. 

CARRIE M. FLINT, 
Professor of Instrumental Music. 
GERTRUDE ALBERTSON. 
Professor of Harmony and Fine Art. 
HARVEY D. MILLER, B. S., 
Teacher of the Violin. 

Literary Societies. 

CLIONIAN. 
Miss ANNA E. WILSON, President. 
Miss ELLA PENNYP ACKER, Secretary. 

KALOZETEAN. 
SHERIDAN GARMAN, President. 
GEO. A. L. KINDT, Secretary. 
PHILOKOSMIAN. 
D. S. ESHLEMAN, President. 
GEO. H. STEIN, Secretary. 
T. M. C. A. 
GEO. K. HARTMAN, President. 
HARRY W. MAYER, Secretary. 

Y. W. C. A. 
Miss MAGGIE STRICKLER, 
Miss ESTELLA STEHMAN. 



Philokosmian Literary Society. 

Esse Quam Videri. 

Vacation days have passed. 

The universal verdict of the members is 
that they were far too short ; but the 
time has come when we must again as- 
sume the duties which fall to the lot of 
the student. The first session of our 
society, which was held on the eve of the 
3rd inst., was a very pleasant one. Al- 
though we were inclined to regret the 
fact that our vacation was so brief, we 
felt as if we had again returned home, as 
we assembled in our accustomed place. 



The programme was well rendered, the 
members having made better preparation 
than is usually done for the first session 
of the term. 

We were also pleased with the large 
number of visitors present as well as 
with the encouraging remarks which they 
gave us. 

They were the following : Messrs. D. 
A. Kreider, Albert, Henry, Yoe, Wallace, 
Buddinger, Boj-er, Runkel, Beattie, Gar- 
ber and Hoverter. Two of these gentle- 
men, Messrs. Garber and Runkel, have 
already joined our ranks, and we expect 
more to follow. 

Mr. Albert, who had been attending the 
College several years ago and had then 
become a Philo, expects to take active 
part in society work. 

Several of our members have not yet 
returned to school. 

J. H. Maysilles is now at the World's 
Fair, and Messrs. Huber and W. H. 
Kreider have recently returned from a 
visit to the same place. During vacation 
the societ} r had several very able repre- 
sentatives in the field as canvassers, 
among whom were Messrs. Huber, Hoer- 
ner, Hartman, Wallace and Wingerd. 

Our work thus far has been encourag- 
ing, and we look forward hopeful of good 
results from our efforts during the year. 



Our Alumni. 

'72. Rev. J. W. Etter, D. D., was elected 
editor of the Sunday School Literature of 
the II. B. Church, by the General Confer- 
ence in May last. 

'72. Rev. John H. Graybill, A. M., of 
Pittsburg, is temporarily supplying the 
pulpit of the Rev. Robert E. Carter, Pres- 
byterian church, Lebanon. 

'74. Hiram E. Steinmetz, A. M., is one 
of the lay delegates to the next annual 
session of the East Pennsylvania Confer- 
ence. 

'77. George W. Hursh, A. M., M. D., is 
now connected with one of the hospitals 
in the city of Chicago, 111. 

'80. Miss Alice K. Gingrich, M. A., takes 
the position of Professor in Music in San 
Joaquin Yalley College, Woodbridge, Cal- 
ifornia. 

'81. Rev. S. K. Wine, A. M., was re- 
cently elected principal of Fostoria 
Academy, Fostoria, Ohio. 

'84. Glossbrenner W. Hanger, a. m 
now fills a position in the Interior De* 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



41 



partment that commands a salary of $2,800 
a year. 

'90. Prof. Wm. H. Kindt, A. M.. is now 
principal of the Public High School, Mid- 
clletown, Pa. 

'90. James T. Spangler, A. B., was re- 
cently married to a lady of Johnstown, 
Pa. He continues his studies at the IT. B. 
Seminary the coming year. 

'91. John Wilson Owen, B. S., has re- 
cently taken charge of one of the public 
schools near Waynesboro, Pa, 

'92. Miss Florence R. Brindle is the 
popular organist of the Protestant Epis- 
copal Church at Shamokin, Pa. 

'93. John L. Meyer, A. B., and Samuel 
T. Meyer, A. B., are now employed as 
teachers in the public schools of North 
Annville. At a recent examination held 
by County Superintendent Snoke, John - 
L. Meyer spelled correctly every word 
dictated and made a certificate of 12£. 
Samuel T., is better by one-fourth, his 
certificate counting 12^. 

'93. Horace W. Crider, B. S., is making 
arrangements to enter the stationery busi- 
ness. He spent a few days at the College 
during the opening week of the present 
term. 



Personals and Locals. 

Mr. J onas Garber, of Salunga, who over 
twenty-five years ago was a student in the 
College, brought his son to College this 
term. 

Rev. Hutzler, of Lancaster, conducted 
chapel service on the 18th inst. 

A number of residents of Annville are 
availing themselves of the privileges of 
the library by paying the yearly dues. 

There is an effort being made to open a 
reading room in town. 

Mr. Charles Henry, of this place, a 
former student, has entered Yale, in the 
Department of Law. 

A number of students were delayed at 
Jhe World's Fair, and some were side- 
cached on their way home. Their mate- 
rialization has caused much joy and manv 
a good hand shake. 

Mr. H. Lenich Meyer, '94, will teach 
the "young ideas how to shoot" during 
lll e winter, and will enter regularly next 
spring. He is principal of the schools of 

Mr. Samuel Huber, '94, in canvassing 
! °r the " Chautauquan Desk" during the 
past summer, excelled all students of 
AV of the colleges that ever canvassed 
0r it. The firm speaks in most flattering 



terms of his ability. L. V. C. is at the 
head. Her students are always among 
the front and welcome competition. 

Dr. E. D. Marshall, the popular plrysi- 
cian among the boys, has beautified his 
home and fitted it up with all the modern 
conveniences. 

The property adjacent to Kinports & 
Shenk's store has been purchased hy the 
Annville National Bank, upon which they 
will build a handsome banking house next 
spring. 

The Lawn Tennis Club has been re-or- 
ganized with the following officers : Presi- 
dent, W. H. Kreider ; Treasurer, Harry 
Mayer. 



For Ambitious Boys. 

A boy is something like a piece of iron, 
which in its rough state isn't worth much, 
nor is it of verj- much use, but the more 
processes it is put through the more valu- 
able it becomes. A bar of iron that is 
worth only five dollars in its natural state 
is worth twelve dollars when it is made 
into horseshoes ; and after it goes through 
the different processes by which it is 
made into needles its value is increased 
to $350. Made into knife blades it would 
be worth $3,000, and into balance wheels 
for watches $250,000. Just think of that, 
boys ; a piece of iron that is comparatively 
worthless can be developed into such val- 
uable material. 

But the iron has got to go through a 
great deal of hammering, beating and roll- 
ing and pounding and polishing ; and so if 
you are to become useful and educated 
men, you must go through a long course 
of study and training. The more time 
you spend in hard study the better ma- 
terial you will make The iron does not 
have to go through half so much to be 
made into horseshoes as it does to be 
converted into delicate watch springs ; 
but think how much less valuable it is ! 
Which would you rather be, horseshoe or 
watch spring ? It depends on yourselves. 
You can become whichever you will. This 
is your time for preparation for manhood, 
but don't you think we would have you 
settle down to hard study all the time, 
without any intervals for fun. Not a bit 
of it. We like to see boys have a good 
time, and should be very sorry to see you 
grow old before your time ; but you have 
ample opportunity for study and play, 
too, so don't neglect the former for the 
sake of the latter — The Southland. 



42 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



Wedded in Elizabethtown. 



A United Brethren Pastor from Derry Church 
Weds Miss Amanda Shirk. 

A beautiful marriage ceremony was 
solemnized in the IT. B. church in Eliza- 
bethtown, on Monday morning at 11 
o'clock. The contracting parties were 
Miss Amanda Shirk, of Elizabethtown, 
daughter of Mr. David B. Shirk, and Rev. 
H. M. Miller, pastor of the U. B. church 
at Derry. The floral decorations of the 
platform and the arch beneath which the 
union was solemnized were beautiful. 
Rev. Gr. K. Harman, of Lebanon Yalley 
College, Paul Shirk of Elizabethtown, 
brother of the bride, Rev. Jos. Daugherty 
of New Cumberland and Mr. Elmer Haak 
of Myerstown, acted as ushers. Miss 
Jennie Blough, of Elizabethtown, rendered 
the familiar wedding march from Lohen- 
grin, as the bridal party walked up the 
aisle preceded by the ushers. The bride 
was dressed in cream China silk and 
carried a bunch of white roses. Miss 
Rebecca Miller, sister of the groom, and 
Rev. D. S. Eshelman, of Lebanon Yalley 
College, were bridesmaid and groomsman. 
Rev. H. B. Dohner, presiding elder of the 
East Pennsylvania U. B. conference as- 
sisted by Rev. J. M. Shelly, pastor of the 
U. B. church at Elizabethtown, officiated. 
A reception followed at the residence of 
the bride's father. The bride and groom 
left at 3 p. m. for Philadelphia, Baltimore 
and Washington. They will settle down 
after their return in Derry, Pa. — Middle- 
town Press. 



The Mighty Dollar. 

From an exchange we clip the famous 
old Prayer to Mammon, that has been 
printed many times and the author of 
which is unknown. In these times when 
so many of us are offering up our devo- 
tions at that shrine, this reacty-made 
appeal may save you many anxious 
moments in composing one yourself. 

O Mighty Dollar 1 our acknowledged 
governor, preserver and benefactor, we 
desire to approach thee on this and every 
occasion with that reverence which is clue 
superior excellence and that regard which 
should ever be cherished for exalted 
greatness. Mighty Dollar, without thee 
in the world, we can do nothing, but with 
thee we can do all things. When sickness 
lays its paralyzing hand upon us thou 



cans't provide for us the tenderest nurses, 
the most skillful physicians, and when the 
last struggle of mortality is over and we 
are being borne to the last resting place 
of the dead, thou cans't provide a band of 
music and a military escort thither, and 
last, but not least, erect a magnificent 
monument over our grave, with a living 
epitaph to perpetuate our memory, and 
while here in the midst of our misfortunes 
and temptations of life we perhaps are 
accused of crimes and brought before 
magistrates thou, Mighty Dollar, cans't 
secure to us a feed lawyer, a bribed judge, 
a packed jury, and we go scot free. Be 
with us, therefore, even in thy decimal 
parts. We feel there is no condition in 
life where thy potent and all powerful 
charms are not felt. 

In thy absence how gloomy is the 
household and desolate is the hearthstone ; 
but where thou, Mighty Dollar ! sat 
upon the gridiron, what an exuberance of 
joy swells every bosom. Thou art the joy 
of our } r outh and the solace of our old age ; 
thou cans't adorn the gentleman and feed 
the jackass ; thou art the favorite of the 
philosopher and the ideal of the lunk-head. 
When an election is to be carried, 
Mighty Dollar, thou art the most potent 
argument of politicians and demagogues, 
and the umpire that decides the contest. 

Mighty Dollar, thou art worshipped the 
world over ; thou hast no hypocrites in 
thy temples and no false hearts at thy 
altar ; kings and courtiers bow before thee; 
and all nations adore thee ; thou art loved 
by civilization and savage alike with mi- 
feigned and unfaltering affection. 

Mighty Dollar! be with us we he- 
seech thee, attended by an inexpressible 
number of thy ministering angels made in 
thine own image, even though they be hut 
silver quarters, whose gladdening light 
shall illuminate the penury and want 
with heavenly radiance which shall cause 
the awakened soul to break forth in ac- 
clamations of joy. Mighty Dollar, thou art 
the guide of our foot-steps and the goal 
of our being. Guided by thy silver Hg ut 
we may hope to reach the golden gate, 
and triumphantly enter while hands har- 
moniously sweep the golden harps as we 
walk the golden streets. 

" Mighty Dollar ! thy shining face 
Bespeaks thy wondrous power ; 

My pockets be thy resting place — 
' I need thee every hour.' " 





THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



43 



"College Day" Collections. 

EAST PENNSYLVANIA CONFERENCE. 



East Harrisburg (1892), $3 66 

ghaefferstown (1892), 50 

Paradise,. 16 46 

Lititz, 2 50 

Lancaster, 6 54 

Steelton, 4 00 

Mountville, 20 00 

Annville, 40 87 

Lebanon, 9 95 

Ephrata, 4 24 

Mount Joy, 4 00 

Manheim, 4 36 

JIT~0S 

PENNSYLVANIA CONFERENCE. 

Manchester (1892), $3 00 

Salem, Baltimore (1892), 38 59 

lallastown (1892), 5 00 

Fifth Church, Baltimore, 4 50 

Shippensburg, 6 50 

Shoop's Station, 8 30 

Second Church, York, 10 00 

New Cumberland, . 5 00 

Salem, Baltimore (1893), 40 00 

Mechanicsburg, • 10 24 

Hanover, 3 00 

First Church, York, 10 00 

Scott Street, Baltimore, 10 00 

Waynesboro, 1 51 

Duncannon, 2 00 

Rayville Circuit, 5 00 

Perry Circuit, 12 00 

Dallastown (1893), 5 00 

Third Church, York, 3 00 

182 64 

EAST GERMAN CONFERENCE. 

Myerstown, 3 00 

Total, $302 72 



Bible Study. 

The systematic study of the Word of 
God cannot be over-estimated. By it the 
faithful student acquires a knowledge of 
^e principles of the best ethics the world 
e ^er knew ; by it he learns to know the 
connected history of a race of people — 
toe Jews — that have no equal in the 
Glials of the world, and by it he becomes 
jcquainted with his own condition as a 
alien creature and finds a way of escape 
his impending doom in the offered 
Ovation through Jesus Christ. 

In no 3'ear of its interesting history 
" a s Lebanon Valley College been without 



an organized class of young men and 
women pursuing this work. In the early 
years President Bierman had charge of a 
large Bible class which met weekly, on 
Sunday afternoon at 3 o'clock, in the Col- 
lege Chapel and there spent at least one 
hour. Later others took up this work 
and much was accomplished in building 
up believers and in bringing sinners to 
Christ. 

In 1887 Professor Deaner, at the solicit- 
ation of students and others, organized a 
Bible Normal Union Class, and after a 
full years' faithful work eight members 
were graduated. This work was resumed 
at the opening of each collegiate year 
since that time, and to attempt at this 
time to enumerate the benefits and bless- 
ings derived from these faithful labors 
would require more time and space than 
we can spare. 

It is only necessary to say in this con- 
nection that there is now as usual hereto- 
fore an interesting class organized and 
busily engaged from Sabbath to Sabbath 
in the blessed soul refreshing work. 



The Analytical and Psychological in 
Teaching. 

BY PROF. W. J. BALTZELL, A. M. 

(Read before the Penna. State Music Teachers' As- 
sociation at Reading, Dec. 28, 1892.) 

As prefatory to the remarks properly 
on the subject, I feel impelled to advert to 
a disposition on the part of many who 
follow the so-called learned professions to 
look upon a musician as a disciple of an 
art which is prominent in its aesthetic 
character, and involves, in but a small 
degree, the exercise of the higher intellect- 
ual faculties. It is not necessary to deny 
such an assertion. Music is its own best 
argument in its own favor. 

Still, it is contended that music is not 
a profession ; hence the question which is 
often put, " What is a professor ?" referr- 
ing to the fact that certain teachers of 
music use the title, while others disclaim 
it. Has a teacher a right to such designa- 
tion ? What is a professor ? 

In a certain encyclopaedia may be read 
that the word is " occasionally used in a 
loose way. ... It has been assumed as a 
designation not only by instructors in 
music and dancing, but by conjurors." 
And even in the classic precints of the 
Hub, I have seen a sign bearing the image 



44 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



and inscription of " Professor Robinson, 
Bootblack." 

Whether or not music be a learned pro- 
fession, as professions are sometimes self- 
styled, it has qualities worthy of admira- 
tion, and displays intellectual power as 
well as the recognized learned professions. 

It shows inspiration as well as divinity, 
intricacy and complexity as well as law, 
soothing as well as medicine. But whether 
music is oris not a learned profession, it 
is an art, it is our art, and we profess it, 
we love it, and we worship it as the best 
and highest of arts. It is man's constant 
companion from the cradle to the grave ; 
from his earliest breath to his latest man 
may be said to sing. 

In the Poets' Corner in Westminster 
Abbey rests one, who, not only a poet but 
a philosopher as well, writes with the 
beauty of diction and depth of thought 
that have made Robert Browning world- 
renowned : 

" There is no truer truth obtainable 
By man than comes of music . . . 

... to match and mate 
Feeling with knowleege — make as manifest 
Soul's work as mind's work . . 

. . . have the plain result to show 
How we feel, hard and fast as what we know — 
This was the prize and is the puzzle which 
Music essays to solve . . . 
All arts endeavor this, and she the most 
Attains thereto." 

Granted, then, that our art has claim to 
preeminence, what may we sa,y of the 
masters in the world of music? Prof. 
Banister, the well-known English writer, 
says : " I can not well think an} 7 higher 
mental achievement possible than is ex- 
emplified in Bach's Art of Fugue with its 
well-nigh incredible contrapuntal involve- 
ments, fugues taken en masse, by inverse 
movement, and the like." 

Richard Wagner has well expressed the 
feeling of all who try to measure the in- 
tellectual element of musical creation when 
he writes : 

" Beethoven developed the symphonic 
form to such comprehensive breadth, and 
filled it with contents of such unprece- 
dentedly various and ravishing melody, 
that we stand to-day before the symphon} 7 
of Beethoven as before the stone that 
marks the boundary of an entirety new 
period in the history of art; for in it, 
there came into the world a phenomenon, 



nothing even approaching which is to be 
found in the art of any age or nation." 

With such intellectual and creative 
giants for our leaders and examples, cer- 
tainly does it behoove us, humble students 
of the art they glorified, to labor to un- 
derstand the true essentials of what we 
study, and the more is it incumbent upon 
us who undertake to guide aspiring minds 
to delve deeply into the principles upon 
which is founded true excellence in the 
branch or branches of the art we follow, 
and have elected to " profess." 

The aim of all education should be 
artistic excellence, and it may safely be 
postulated that artistic excellence can not 
be obtained without artistic education. 
Genius of the highest nature alone may 
have such self-sacrificing activity of mind 
and such strong, safe and pure feeling, as 
to lead its possessor always in the right 
path. 

It was this characteristic that gave to 
Beethoven the self-assurance that caused 
Haydn to dub him the " Great Mogul," 
and led the young composer, conscious of 
his own power to judge, to answer Ries, 
when the latter cited distinguished autho- 
rit3 T against certain consecutive fifths in 
an early quartet, " I say it is right." 

But we are not geniuses, only men and 
women of average mental calibre. We 
must study under the best guidance pos- 
sible for us to secure, if we would obtain 
artistic excellence, and our pupils are of 
about the same intelligence. Imitation of 
a teacher, alone, will never carry a pupil 
to a creditable degree of excellence. A 
pupil must learn to stand alone ; his judg- 
ment must be formed and matured so that 
he may have a safe criterion by which to 
appreciate the contents of each work of 
art and every part thereof, or to value 
properly artistic excellence in any form. 
Only as a student has a true ideal of what 
he is striving to make his own, to assimi- 
late, and to impress with his own indi- 
viduality, can he hope to reach any con- 
siderable degree of excellence. 

Power and clearness of conception are 
all important, and to develop this faculty 
in the pupil is the constant and greatest 
demand upon the teacher. The young 
pupil has not the requisite mental strength 
and, even if he has, lacks the power of ap- 
plying it, because he is unused to mental 
processes of the higher nature. 

All building, mental or material, Wjj 
volves two distinct acts. The artist and 




THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



45 



st 

Qg 

A 
ip- 

tal 
li- 



the architect must have a conception of 
the work to be constructed, and then the 
details of construction will be worked out ; 
the synthetic or creative, and the analytic, 
involving the constructive, must both be 
employed, and no artistic results can be 
reached without such power and such facul- 
ties of mind. Genius is essentially synthe- 
tic, although it may be joined to an intense 
capacity for detail, and devotion to minu- 
tiae ; but talent, whether great or mediocre, 
must depend in a greater measure upon 
the anal3 T tic. 

One branch of our art which peculiarly 
demands mental activity and concentra- 
tion is song. Every one should learn to 
sing. It is man's own true peculiar 
music. The voice is the especial organ 
of our souls. The greater number of 
individuals have a capacity for singing 
sufficient to justify some pursuit of the 
art. The qualification of rich physical 
endowments is not necessary to produce 
a good singer, and alone will not. Much 
of the most touching and joy-inspiring 
capabilities may be obtained if feeling, 
artistic cultivation, and a vivid concep- 
tion speak through a medium even but 
slenderly endowed. 

But to consider the question in a prac- 
tical manner, let it be assumed that a 
person of average endowments, both 
physical and mental, has made arrange- 
ments with a teacher for instruction in 
singing. First in importance is it that 
the pupil should receive such impression 
as will develop within his mind a concep- 
tion of the end he is seeking, create a 
true ideal of singing, which is to be his 
guide and form his criterion of judgment. 

I feel it in order to explain why I say 
"psychological" in the heading of this 
paper, whereas above I used the term 
synthetic. By " psychological " I mean 
the process by which a teacher impresses 
his ideas upon the pupil's mind, and de- 
velops the conception which is to be the 
pupil's guide. In other words, the 
teacher's standpoint is objective, the 
Pupil's subjective; hence the term "psy- 
chological." 

Having impressed upon the pupil's 
toind an ideal of singing, what is the next 
s tep ? He must will or try to sing in 
accordance with the standard just estab- 
hshed. No physical exertion of a definite 
character can take place without previous 
Rental activity. No singer can sing 
"etter than his ideal of true singing. Is 



it likely he will sing at first even so well 
as his own standard demands ? If not, 
why not ? 

Because power and accuracy, which 
bring perfection of detail, are lacking. 
Here is another test of the teacher. The 
pupil's work as shown in tone does not 
reach the standard, because perfection in 
a multitude of details is wanting. 

The analytical faculty now comes into 
use. The many little elements which are 
part of any act of singing, these details 
must be mastered in order that due pro- 
portion of all may produce the perfect 
result. Surely it will aid greatly if these 
many details can be systematized and co- 
ordinated, and broad, general principles 
be formulated. Thus will the work of 
teacher and pupil be simplified and ren- 
dered clearer. 

Let us now analyze the pupil's tone or 
its production. Fault is apparent. All 
the physical activity is comprehended in 
the activity of the vocal organ and the 
means for the transmission of that activity 
unimpeded and unimpaired. Whatever 
faults exist may be referred to one or the 
other, or perhaps to both. The essence 
of the tone is the breath. The breath is 
not in proper activity. It is not properly 
directed and controlled. The teacher's 
idea of control should now be impressed 
upon the pupil's mind, so that the latter 
may have the teacher's standard to help 
him in his efforts. Now let the pupil try 
to sing. The result may be better, but 
still not right. Why this failure? The 
pupil has only an imperfect conception of 
the teacher's standard, naturally also 
imperfection of detail, or, physically 
speaking, the muscles lack power and 
accuracy of the specific kind necessary to 
produce the required act. 

Repetition of one and the same concen- 
trated mental and cognate physical act 
alone can lead to perfection. As the tone 
is produced and heard time after time it 
is the teacher's duty to analyze it and de- 
cide what is the greatest trouble. The 
tone is made up of various elements, and 
the teacher should seize upon the predom- 
inant faulty one, decide wherein the 
mental energy and consequent physical 
activity is misdirected, and correct that 
act. 

A mental power to place himself, as it 
were, in the mind of the pupil, and sieze 
upon the tone as his own production, is 
of great value to a teacher in aiding to 



40 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



discover the prime source of fault. I 
know of no better way to illustrate this 
thought than to quote from Edgar Allan 
Poe, himself the greatest analytical genius 
American literature has known. In one 
of his prose tales he uses as a character a 
man of extraordinary acumen and analyt- 
ical power. The anecdote in point is 
related by this character as an illustration 
of this mental self-transposition. 

" I knew a boy about eight years of age, 
whose success in the game of even and 
odd ' attracted great admiration. The 
game is played with marbles. One player 
holds in his hand a number of the toys 
and another guesses ' even ' or ' odd ' as 
he chooses. If the guess is right the 
guesser wins one ; if wrong he forfeits 
one. The boy alluded to won all the 
marbles in the school. Of course he had 
a system, and this lay in observation and 
admeasurement of the astuteness of his 
opponents. In other words, he identified 
his reasoning and intellect with his op- 
ponents. But how could a boy carry on 
so subtle an intellectual process? His 
answer, when questioned, was substan- 
tially as follows : 

" ' When I wish to find out how wise or 
how stupid or how good or how wicked 
is any one, or what are his thoughts at the 
moment, I fashion the expression of my 
face as accurately as possible in accord- 
ance with the expression of his, and then 
wait to see what thoughts or sentiments 
arise in my mind or heart, as if to match 
or correspond with the expi'ession.' " 

To place this thought in a bo3''s lan- 
guage would be to say that a boy, known 
to be dull, would reason thus : The first 
time I had them even, this time I will 
make them odd. Our boy follows up his 
train of thought, guesses odd and wins. 
But another bo} r , of brighter mind, might 
at first think to change, but would likely 
reject the idea on second thought and 
keep them even. Our boy would try to 
follow his thought and guesses even and 
wins. Of course in this case there can be 
but two combinations. 

But in singing there can be many 
varieties of tone, and as experience 
broadens a teacher learns to refer each to 
its prime fault. The expression of intent- 
ness in the face, the lips, tongue, eyes, 
poise of the head, all these point uner- 
ringly to certain troubles. If there be 
some new fault, I have found no way 
better to reach the seat of trouble than 



to attempt, myself, to reproduce the 
pupil's tone and expression by imitation 
and thus form an idea of the fault by 
analyzing the accompanying sensation. 
An exaggeration of this will frequently 
make clear the pupil's fault to him and 
aid him to correct it. 

It is my firm opinion that in order to 
produce the best results with a pupil, 
whether of small, average, or unusual in- 
telligence, the teacher must work through 
the mind, and this psychological training 
must be accompanied by a constant analy- 
sis of the mental operations of the pupil. 
If I desire a pupil to sing a certain 
vowel sound, it would scarcely be feasible 
to tell him to arrange tongue, lips, teeth 
in a certain manner. Man is largely a 
creature of imitation, and this imitative 
faculty will assist in producing the de- 
sired qualit3 T . When, after several at- 
tempts to produce a sound like the 
teacher sang, a fair degree of success lias 
been obtained, the sensation that accom- 
panies that production is to be remem- 
bered, since it is the product of the 
operations of all the muscles invoked, 
and the reproduction — or, if you prefer it, 
the imitation — of that sensation will re- 
produce the quality. Furthermore, as 
long as a mental state be maintained, no 
change of muscular action can take place, 
and no change of vocal qualit}-. If uni- 
formity and steadiness be essentials of 
pure tone, they must be produced by 
similar conditions of mental action. This 
demands intense mental concentration. 
A wavering of the mind toward some 
other object than the sound to be pro- 
duced and maintained is fatal to good 
results. I call to mind an illustration of t his. 

Several years ago, while in London, I 
had charge of the training of the solo boys 
in a choir. On one occasion, while drill- 
ing one of them on sustained notes, I 
found he did not emit his voice with the 
usual purity. I asked him what was the 
matter, and he did not know. I made 
him try again, and caught a wandering 
glance. " Frank," said I, " what are you 
thinking about ? " He hung his head for 
a moment and then said, " About spinning 
my top." This will apply equally well to 
hats, bonnets, gowns, and last night s 
dance. 

{To be Continued.) 



Truth is not a stagnant pool, but 
fountain. 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



47 



CUMBERLAND VALLEY" RAILROAD. 

time a able-dec. is. 1392. 



Down Trains. 



Is. Winchester 

" Martinsburg . . 

' Hagerstown 

'• Greencastle 

" Chambersburg 
" Shippensburg 



C'bg 
Acc. 



Ky'e 
Exp 



No. 12 No. 2 



6 15 

6 35 

Newville I 6 55 

7 20 
7 44 



" Carlisle.. 
" Mechauicsburg.. 

Ar. Dillsburg 

" Harrisburg 



Philadelphia., 

New York 

Baltimore 



A. M. 

6 20 

7 03 

7 42 

8 06 
8 30 

8 52 

9 12 
9 35 

10 00 



10 20 

1 25 
400 
1 25 

P. M. 



Mr'g 


Bay 


Ev'g 


N*gt 


Mail 


Exp 


Mail 


Exp 


No. 4 


No. 6 


No. 8 


No. 10 


A. M. 


P. M. 


P. M. 


P. M. 






2 20 


500 






3 10 


7 10 


825 


11 45 


400 


10 05 




12 09 


4 26 


10 25 


9 02 


12 32 


506 


10 46 




12 53 


5 20 


11 07 




1 10 


5 41 


11 27 


9 51 


1 35 


6 07 


11 45 




12 55 


6 34 


12 04 




4 43 


7 0a 




10 28 


218 


715 


12 20 








A. M. 


1 25 


6 50 


10 55 


4 25 


4 00 


9 35 


3 50 


7 10 


1 25 


6 45 


10 40 


6 20 


P. M. 


P. M. 


P. M. 


AM. 



Additional trains will leave Carlisle daily except Sunday at 
5:55 a. m., 12:30 p. m., 3:45 p. m., stopping at all intermediate 
stations, arriving at Harrisburg at 6:40 a. m., 1:15 p. m., 4:33 
p. m. 

Evening Mail runs daily between Harrisburg and Cham 
bersburg. 



Up Trains. 



Lv. Baltimore 

" New York .. .. 
" Philadelphia.. 



" Harrisburg 

" Dillsburg 

" Mechauicsburg. 

" Carlisle 

" Newville 

" Shippensburg.... 
" Chambersburg.. 

" Greencastle 

" Hagerstown 

" Martinsburg 

Ar. Winchester 



Win 
Acc. 



No. 1 



P. M. 
11 30 
8 00 
11 20 

A. M. 

6 12 



a 27 

6 57 

7 21 

7 -in 
S 03 

8 24 

8 55 

9 40 
10 30 

A. M. 



Me's Hag Ev'g 
Exp Acc. Mail 



No. 3 'No. 5 No. 7 



A. M. 

4 45 
12 15 

4 30 

A. M. 

7 55 
715 

8 11 
8 31 

8 53 
915 

9 40 
10 10 
10 20 



8 50 

P. M. 

12 30 
12 10 
12 51 
1 15 

1 42 

2 02 
2 30 

2 52 

3 15 



A. M. | P. M. 



11 20 
9 00 
11 40 
P. M. 
3 45 



C'bg 
Acc. 



No.19 



P. M. P. M 



4 25 
2 00 
4 35 
P. M. 
8 00 
8 10 
8 20 

8 44 

9 08 
9 29 
9 50 



No. 9 



4 06 
4 30 

4 55 

5 16 

5 42 

6 03 

6 30 

7 12 

8 00 

P. M. | P. M. A. M. 



4 25 

5 00 
7 40 

P. M. 
10 25 

10 41 

10 58 

11 14 
11 38 
11 29 

11 47 

12 25 



Additional trains will leave Harrisburg daily except Sunday 
at 8:25 a. m., 10:35 a. m.. 5:15 p. m., arriving at Carlisle at 9:10 
a. m., 11:20 a. m., 6:00 p. m., stopping at all intermediate 
stations ; on Saturday additional train will leave Harrisburg 
at 6:20 p. m., arriving at Mechanicsburg 6:41 p. m., stopping 
at all intermediate stations. 

Pullman Palace Sleeping Cars between Hagerstown and New 
York on Keystone Express and Night Express east, and on 
Memphis Express and New Orleans Express west. 

Pullman Sleeping Cars on Night Express and New Orleans 
Express between Philadelphia and New Orleans. 



TF you wish to advertise anything anywhere at any time, 
I write to GEO. P. ROWELL & Co., No. 10 Spruce Street, 
aew York. 

EVERV one in need if information on the subject of ad- 
vertising will do well to obtain a copy of "Book for 
Advertisers, ' ' 368 pages, price one dollar. Mailed, postage 
Wul, on receipt of price. Contains a careful compilation from 
Jae American Newspaper Directory of all the best papers 
"id class journals; gives the circulation rating of every one, 
Jad a good deal of information about rates ana other matters 
Pertaining to the business of advertising. Address ROW- 
\ork S adyertisi:no BUREAU, 10 Spruce Street, New 



Everybody's Law Book/' 

' s the title of the new 768 page work now in press, 
Prepared by J. Alexander Koones, L L. B., member 
of the New York Bar. 

, "enables every man and woman to be their own 
"} w yer. it teaches what are your rights and how to 
maintain them. When to begin a law suit and when 
'° shun one. It contains the useful information 
|7^ r y business man needs in every State in the Un- 
ns r contains business forms of every variety 
?»wul to the lawyer as well as to all who have legal 
u «8iness to transact. 

inclose two dollars for a copy, or inclose two-cent 
postage stamp for a table of contents and terms to 
X^&ts. Address BEN J. W. HITCHCOCK, Pub- 
^"8^ 385 Sixth Avenue, New York. 



W. F. BECKER. 



J. P. BRUGGER. 



— THE 

Eastern Book Store, 

315 Market St., Harrisburg, Pa. 
BOOKS AM) STATIONERY. 

Special Rates to Students. 

Second-Hand School Books a Specialty. 

WRITE FOR PRICES. 



J 



L. SAYLOR & SONS, 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

CARRIAGES, 

LIGHT BUGGIES, PONY PHAETONS, ETC. 
STRICTLY FIRST CLASS. 

Shops Opposite Eagle Hotel, ANNVILLE, PA 



B. MARSHALL, M. D., 

No. 34 East Main Street, 

ANNVILLE, PA. 



ISAAC MANN & SON, 

-v^THEV- 

LARGEST CLOTHIERS, 

834 Cumberland Street, 

LEBANON, F>A. 

THE BEST GOODS FOR THE LEAST MONEY. 



T R. McCAULY, 
DAILY MEAT MARKET. 

GOOD MEAT. LOW PRICES. ANNVILLE. PA. 



J 



OHN TRUMP, 
BOOT AND SHOE MAKER, 

ANNVILLE, PA. 



WS. SEABOLD, 
. DEALER IN 



Drugs, Medicines, Perfumery and Toilet Articles, 

No. 2 East Main St., Annville, Pa. 



J- 



S. KENDIG, 

BAKERY, 

Next Door to Eagle Hotel, Annville, Pa. 



w 



J. KIEFER, M. D., 
HOMEOPATHIC PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON. 
76 West Main St., Animlle, Pa. 



T\EXTER LIVERY AND HOARDING STABLE 

D RAILROAD ST., ANNVILLE, PA. 

R. A. MAULFAIR, - PROP'R. 

GOOD TEAMS AT REASONABLE BATES. 



43 



THE COLLEGE FOR UM. 



^yiLLIAM KIEBLER, 

SHAVING AND HAIR DRESSING, 

Eagle Hotel Barber Shop, Annville, Pa. 

A DAM B. HESS, 

±\. OFFICE AT THE HOTEL EAGLE. 

OMNIBUS TO ALL TRAINS. 

ANNVILLE. PA. 



J 



ACOB SARGENT, 
FASHIONABLE TAILOR. 

18 and 30 Main St., Annville, Pa. 



D 1 



\R Y GOODS, NOTIONS, GRO- 
CERIES, BOOTS and SHOES, 

—AND— 

GENTS' FURNISHING GOODS. 

J. £*. SHOPB, 

ANNVILLE, PA. 

AC. M. HEISTER, 
• STATIONERY JOB PRINTER, 

Visiting Cards a Specialty. 

35 S. White Oak Street - - Annville, Pa. 

WILLIAM WALTZ, 
FASHIONABLE 

HAIR CUTTING AND SHAVING SALOON, 

West Main Street, Annville, Pa. 



J NO. £. HE BR. 



H. H. KREIDEB. 

KREIDER & CO., 
DEALERS IN ALL KINDS OF 

Hard & Soft Coal, Grain, Seeds Salt & Feed. 

Office : Railroad Street, near Depot, 
Telephone Connection. ANNVILLE, PA. 



THE BEST STOCK, THE LOWEST 
PRICES IN 

FURNITURE, jos EPH MILLER'S, 

ANNVILLE, PA. 

DEE- SHAUD, 

DEALER IN 

Gold Watches and Jewelry, 

Wholesale and Retail Dealer in 
FINE CANDIES AND FRUITS. 

Families and Entertainments Supplied with OYS. 
TERS AND CREAM. AWNITILLE, PA. 



S. M. SHENK'S BAKERY. 

HAS ALWAYS ON HAND 

FRESH BREAD, CAKES AND ROLLS, 

One Door West Penn'a House, Annville. 



S. 33. -W"-A.C3-Kr332=L, 

— ^>y Headquarters f or -V*"— 

GROCERIES, CONFECTIONERIES 

OYSTERS, FRUITS AND NUTS. 

Restaurant Attached. Meals at All Hours. 

12 West Main Street, Annville, Pa. 



If you want to Buy a Hat rignt, and a rignt Hat, or anything in 
Men's Furnishings, 

GO TO 

Successors to RAITT & Co., 

708 Cumberland Street, Lebanon, Pa. 



Kinports & Shenfe 

ANNVILLE, PA., 

Dealers in Dry Goods, Notions 

and Ladies' Dress Goods. 

Men's Suitings we make a Specialty. Home-made, 
Ingrain and Brussels Carpets. You buy Cheaper 
from us than away from home, and have a large 
stock to select from. 

THE 

U.B. MUTUAL AID SOCIETY 

OF PENNSYLVANIA. 1 

HOME OFFICE, LEBANON, PENNA. 

Chartered by the State Legislature, March 11, 1869. 
Positive amounts guaranteed and claims paid in 
full. 

Benefits of $1000 insurance secured for $S.f 0. 
Keciprocal Circle Insurance,new and very popular. 

Invested Assets $146,809.94 

Contingent Assets 116,970.00 

Assessment Basis 5,295,000.00 

Death Losses Paid 6,774,123.01 

THE PLAN. 

The payment of EIGHT DOLLARS on application, 
FIVE DOLLARS annually for four years, and there- 
after TWO DOLLARS annually during life, with 
pro kata mortality assessments for each death of a 
member insured for $1000, is as follows: 



AGE. 


Ass'tI 


Age. 


Ass'mt 


Age. 


Ass'mt 


Age. 


Assm't 


20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 
26 


65 
66 
67 
68 
69 
70 
71 


30 
31 
32 
33 
34 
35 
36 


75 
77 
79 
81 

83 
85 
86 


40 
41 
42 
43 
44 
45 
46 
47 


90 
92 
94 
96 
98 
1 00 
1 06 
1 12 


50 
51 
52 
53 
54 
55 
56 


1 40 
1 5* 
1 60 
1 70 
1 80 
1 92 


27 


72 


37 


87 










28 


73 


38 


88 


48 


1 18 






29 


74 


39 


89 


49 


1 24 







This will entitle a member to a certificate of 
to be paid after death to the legal beneficiary, when- 
ever such death may occur. 

Reliable Agents Wanted Everywhere. 

CHOICE BEEF, LAMB, VEAL, PORK Atf n 
TONGUES at 

Maulfair's Daily Meat Market, 

ANNVILLE, PA. 



Volume VI. 



Number 8. 



THE 



College Forum. 



OCTOBER, 1893. 



• f CONTENTS : . 



Jf AUK 

Editorials 49 50 

The Analytical and Psychological in Teach- 

in S 50-52 

Prohibition Meeting 52 

The Lecture Course 52, 53 

An Address by Hiram E. Steinmetz . . 53-55 

"Let There Be Light " 55, 56 

College Directory 57 

Philokosmian Literary Society 57 

Kalozetean Literary Society 57, 58 

Our Alumni 58 



Personals and Locals 



PAGE 

58, 59 

Christian Association Notes 59 

Y. M. C. A. State Convention 59, 60 

Reviews .60 

The Chestuut Picnic 60 

A Blossom Study -. 60 61 

Rev. D. S. Early's Knock-Down Reply to 

Cardinal McCloskey . . . 61, 62 

A Lesson from Pompeii 62 

Advertisements 62-64 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE, 
ANNVILLE, PA. 



HARRY LIGHT, 

BOOKS AND STATIONERY, 



22 EAST MAIN ST., ANNVILLE, PA. 



Our shelves are constantly filled with 
New, Second-Hand and Shelf-Worn 



School s College Text Books, 



w 
o 

< 

O ' g 

W Together with a Complete Assortment of v -' 

O 

S5 

►J 
»J 
W 

CO 
& 

PQ 
W 



STATIONERY, 

Wall Paper and Window Shades. 

A Selected Stock of the 

LATEST STYLES OF WALL PAPER 

AND 

DECORATIONS. 



SCHOOL AND COLLEGE TEXT BOOKS A SPECIALTY. 
C- SMITH, 



ANNVILLE, PA. 



HEADQUARTERS FOR 



ONE PRICE ONLY . 

SATISFACTION GUARANTEED. 
828 CUMBKRIjAND STREET. 



ON MARKET ST., AT THE RIVER BRIDGE, 

HAERISBUEG, FA.. 

CARPETS, OIL CLOTHS, ETC* 




Always sold at the Lowest Cash Prices. All Gooda. 
Guaranteed to be as represented. Rag and Ingrain 
Carpets 25 cents per yard up. Floor and Table Oil: 
Cloths 25 cents per yard up. 

FRED. VI. YINGST, on Market St., at the Bridge. 



INCLUDING 
NORMAL DEPARTMENT. 
OLD BOOKS. NEW BOOKS. 

Cheapest place in the Lebanon Valley to buy your 
Books. >8®" New and Old Books Bought, 
Sold and Exchanged. 

WATCHES, CLOCKS AND JEWELRY, 

SILVER PL ATE D WARE, 

Spectacles a Specialty. Fittecl W^^jfcf" *** 

PERFECT FOCUS AND FIT GUARANTEED. 



ISAAC WOLF, 

s 



When you need Books or Stationery of any kind, 
correspond with or call on us. By so doing you will 
secure the Best Goods at the most Favorable Prices. • 

Stock always New and Fresh. Assortment Large. 
Prices the Lowest. Whether you intend to buy 25o. 
or $25.00 worth, it will pay you to call to see us. ^ 

Bagster's and Oxford Teachers' Bibles a Specialty. 
We carry in stock the publications of the U. B.. 
Publishing House, such as Otterbein Hymnals, 
Hymns of the Sanctuary, the Books used in the 
three years' course of study, S. S. Music Books, .r 

AGENTS WANTED to sell the best and most 
popular Lord's Prayer published. Send 75 centsftrt 
sample copy, worth $2.00. Address plainly 

CRIDER & BROTHER, 

PUBLISHERS OF 

Photograph MarriageCertiftcates 

Photograph Family Records, Etc., Etc., 

YORK, PA. 



PLEASE MENTION « THE COLLEGE FOIIUM." 



THE COLLEGE FOKUM. 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 

Vol. VI. No. 8. ANNYILLE, PA., OCTOBER, 1893. Whole No. 64. 



EDITORS. 

H. CLAY DEANEK, A. M., 
Editor-in-Chief and Publisher. 



ASSOCIATE EDITORS. 

John H. Maysilles, '95. D. S. Eshelman, '94. 

William H. Kreider, '94. 

SOCIETY EDITORS. 
Clionian Society— Miss Maggie Strickler, '94. 
Philokosmian Society— Oscar E. Good, '94. 
Kalozetean Society— G. A. L. Kindt, '94. 

All communications or items of news shonld be sent to 
the Editor in Chief. Subscriptions should be sent to the 
Publishing Agent. 

THE COLLEGE FORUM will be sent monthly for one 
school year on receipt of tvrenty.flve cents. Subscriptions 
received at any time. 

For terms of advertising, address the Publisher. 

Entered at the Post Office at Annville, Pa., as 
second-class mail matter. 



Editorial. 

The coming anniversary of the Clionian 
Literary Society promises a special occa- 
sion. Thanksgiving evening, 1893, will 
be a red letter evening in its history. 
Let none fail to attend. 

The committee whe have charge of the 
grand rally and banquet of the Alumni 
and friends of the College, which will be 
held in Harrisburg on December 28th, 
have nearly completed the arrangements. 

Is there not some one within the 
patronizing conferences who will put up a 
Memorial Hall for the Christian Societies 
of the College ? Such a munificence would 
he the crowning act of a true Christian 
philanthropist. 

The Faculty has decided that any stu- 
dent who makes a term grade of 90 per 
°entum or more, need not be examined to 
Pass a study. The object of the new 
ing is to stimulate more thorough daily 



preparation and to avoid cramming. Its 
announcement met with universal appro- 
bation by the students. 

Tennyson is said to have advised a 
young man to learn one verse of the Bible 
and one of Shakespeare every day. The 
former would teach him how to address 
God, and the latter how to address his 
fellow man.*" 

The week of prayer in behalf of the 
unconverted in colleges, will be held from 
the 12th to the 19th of November. The 
Christian Associations at the College are 
praying for a special manifestation of 
power that there may be a large ingather- 
ing of precious souls. 

The visit of Bishop Weaver on the 19th 
was greatly enjoyed. He delighted us all 
with his words of advice and his joyful 
spirit, verified that gray hairs will not 
make one old and morose, but* are the 
symbols of a sweet and full manhood, 
ripening into immortality. 

A very pleasing event whih occurred 
almost at the beginning of this term, 
September 18, was the sociable which the 
Y. W. C. A. and Y. M. C. A. gave to the 
students and members of the faculty. It 
was a good opportunity for the new 
students to become acquainted and it 
made them feel more free in the midst of 
their new surroundings. All mingled 
freely which added greatly to the. enjoy- 
ment of the occasion. A large spider 
web, arranged in the dining room, afforded 
no little amusement to those who were 
bent on securing a prize. Provision was 



50 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



also made for the inner man and suitable 
refreshments were served. 

These social gatherings are bright spots 
in the memories of College life to each 
one participating in the same. 



The educational meetings held at the 
recent sessions of East German and East 
Pennsylvania Conferences were attended 
with more than the usual interest, and we 
are sanguine enough to look for favorable 
results. The several reports were well 
received, and at the East German, held in 
the town of Lrykens, the Conference was 
addressed by President Bierman, Secre- 
tary Bell and Bishop Kephart. At the 
close of the meeting it was unanimously 
resolved to observe " College Day " on 
all the fields of labor during the coming 
year. This is a step forward in the right 
direction. Heretofore the Conference has 
been a little slow on " College Day," 

At the East Pennsylvania Conference 
held at Steelton very decisive action was 
taken on this subject. A resolution was 
passed' requesting the Bishop to ask the 
question of each pastor next year whether 
the day was observed or not. Though 
East Pennsylvania has usually done well, 
we now expect still better results. Stir- 
ring addresses in the interest of the Col- 
lege we^e delivered at this conference by 
a number of the brethren. A visiting 
committee was also appointed consisting 
of P. E. Dietrick, J. G. W. Herold and 
Hiram E. Steinmetz, 

Messrs. A. S. Riland and Samuel P. 
Engle were elected trustees at LykenSj 
and Revs. H. B. Dohner and C. J. Kep- 
hart and Mr. John B. Stehman at Steelton, 
to represent the East German and the 
East Pennsylvania respectively for the 
next three years. 

The meetings at both places were well 
attended by the members of the Confer- 
ences and the people in general, and there 
cannot come any other but good results 
from the influence of their annual discus- 
sions of the cause of Christian education. 



The Analytical and Psychological in 
Teaching. 

BY PROF. W. J. BALTZELL, A. M. 

(Read before the Penna. State Music Teachers' As- 
sociation at Reading, Dec. 28, 1893.) 

( Continued. ) 

But granted that a teacher must be able 
to appreciate and assimilate his pupil's 
mental state, the question still remains, 
how is he to impress upon the pupil's 
mind the required conception ? I have 
already alluded to the power of imitation. 
But by aiming at repose and unconscious- 
ness of throat and tongue, a teacher can 
granually train mind and muscle until the 
singing mind and singing throat are ab- 
solutel}', as it were, plastic, capable of 
receiving and retaining impressions. 

These impressions will best be made by 
a series of " pictures," as they may be 
called, which the teacher paints upon the 
pupil's mind by words, and the greater or 
less clearness of the idea conveyed by 
these words determines the clearness of the 
conception. The success or failure of a 
teacher may depend in a large, measure 
upon his power of creating conceptions 
in a pupil's mind by figures of speech or 
illustrations drawn from any source. A 
teacher familiar with details of various 
trades or professions from which he draws 
pupils, and also a clear understanding of 
the personal and mental idios}*ncrasies of 
his pupils, can often give illustrations 
which have the peculiar force of the 
familifSr argumentum ad hominem of logic. 

Having succeeded in painting a picture 
on the pupil's mental canvas, the teacher 
should impress upon him the necessity of 
concentration, to the end that the results 
shall be in accord with the design and 
commensurate with the activity set in 
motion. This will obviate the uncertainty 
and wavering, and at times complete 
change of vowel quality on sustained 
tones, singers beginning with one sound 
and ending with another. Mental con- 
centration is the corrective, for if one can, 
through the will, start a certain vowel 
quality, he can by concentrated and con- 
tinuous unchanged volition, preserve 11 
and that without stiffness or a hard tone. 
What insures uniformity and purity oi 
tone is a perfect equipoise, and this is the 
result of a mental effort which duly P 1 ' ' 
portions the various muscular activities 
and thus produces balance. Reproduction 
of a true singing sensation by the natural 



.A 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



51 



operation of the will, dominates the physi- 
cal action of the throat, and robs " blend- 
ing registers " of its terrors to a marked 
degree. 

This psychological process may be car- 
ried out in the study of songs, to produce 
what is called " style " by some, by others 
% expression," or both. The true meaning 
of the words of the song to be rendered is 
a matter for prime consideration. They 
will represent the expression of a series 
of emotions, or vivid pictures. If the 
singer's Tnind has become plastic, if the 
physical organism is reposeful and can be 
kept unconscious, the pupil either through 
his own intelligence or through the im- 
press of the teacher's suggestions, sur- 
renders his mind to the domination of the 
emotions of the song or the influence of 
the vivid pictures, self-consciousness dis- 
appears and the singer becomes a voice 
under the control of the emotions and 
pictures, and these must and will be 
reproduced in such perfection as the 
singer's accuracy of detail has become a 
matter of muscular habit. By accuracy 
of detail I mean the due proportion of 
muscular activity and instantaneous re- 
sponsives of every part of the vocal ap- 
paratus. The power of the mind over the 
voice produces all the delicate shadings 
that the good singer uses, and if carefully 
followed out to the end of acquiring a 
high degree of unconsciousness of muscle, 
the various tone colors that the true artist 
uses. I wish to quote from Fetis con- 
cerning Garat, one of the greatest singers 
of his time : 

" An air or duet, according to this great 
singer, did not consist in a succession of 
well-performed or even well-expressed 
phrases ; he wanted a plan, a gradual pro- 
gress, which led to great effects at the 
proper moment, and when the excitement 
had reached its crisis. He was rarely un- 
derstood, when discussing his art he spoke 
■of the plan of a vocal piece ; but when he 
joined example to precept, and, to demon- 
strate his theory, sang an air, with the 
different coloring he could give to it, they 
1foen comprehended how much of reflec- 
tion and study were necessary in an art 
^hieh at first view seems destined only to 
Procure enjoyment for the ear." 

It was Garat 's preconceived plan which 
Ca used his vocal organ to produce all the 
shading and coloring for which he was so 
la mous. 

But this synthetic process, although it 



attempts from a finished conception to 
cultivate perfection of detail, will be aided 
if accompanied by analytical cultivation ; 
for finish of detail as shown in correct 
muscular habit will react upon the ideal 
conception and increase its ease, refine- 
ment and purity. 

The following is suggested as an illus- 
tration of analysis as applied to the pro- 
duction of various vowels and consonants. 
The aim of singing is purity of tone. In 
this sense, tone absolute is meant. It is 
tone absolute, apart from vowel quality, 
dominated by emotion, that touches and 
sways the human heart ; for one may be 
moved by singing in a foreign language, 
when the sound conveys no expression to 
us, such as we are accustomed to draw 
from familiar words. Back of every vowel 
and consonant is tone absolute, which is 
also independent of pitch, since one may 
sing many different sounds on many differ- 
ent notes. Prom this standpoint tone 
absolute, of course, is but an abstraction ; 
with pitch and a vowel or consonant 
added, it becomes concrete, an entity. 

Having impressed this idea upon a 
pupil's mind, get him to sing " ah," " oh," 
" oo," or any other particular sound, and 
cause him to feel that the vowel quality and 
the pitch are merely incidents of the tone 
and not tone itself. Thus can one with 
some degree of certainty expect to make 
tone w.th repose and balance, for tone 
absolute, lacking definiteness, but being, 
if the expression can be allowed, a faculty 
of the body, can be produced only by re- 
pose ; and by practice one can add to the 
tone absolute, the product of repose, the 
incidents of vowel quality and pitch, 
•giving life and expression, and still not 
disturb the repose of muscle which makes 
the tone and its purity. 

Just at this point I feel a strong im- 
pulse to advert once more to the matter 
of the interpretation of a song, with its 
consequent shading and tone coloring. 
The aim of music and especially song is 
to reproduce the emotions and pictures of 
the poem. We have Beethoven's own 
authority for the statement that when 
composing he always had a picture in his 
mind toward which he worked. But in 
his Pastoral Symphony, for example, he 
is careful to state that his object is not 
to imitate the sounds of nature, but 
rather. to evoke the emotions caused by 
contemplation of natural features. So 
the aim of song is to reproduce what the 



52 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



poem expresses. The hearer is supposed 
to be in a state of susceptibility ; his soul 
is free to receive impressions ; the singer's 
mind and physical system should be in 
repose, quick to respond to the various 
emotions and pictures of the song, and 
these are transferred to the soul of the 
listener, and reproduced there with clear- 
ness and power dependent upon his sus- 
ceptibility, and the vividness of the 
imagery in the mind of the singer, which 
he strives to reproduce, and this imagery 
should control every variety of expression. 

Thus the mind and the muscles become 
habituated to work together with perfect 
balance, so that when one determines to 
sing a certain vowel the muscular appa- 
ratus will instantly respond, and with the 
desired pitch a different vowel sound may 
be taken, the pitch be changed, without 
direct consciousness of muscular effort, 
and within the limits which nature has set 
for the individual voice, it becomes possi- 
ble for the vocal chords to produce a high 
tone as easily as a low, for the tension of 
the vocal chords is in response to the will, 
and they adjust themselves. 

Still, it must not be forgetten that a high 
tone can not be sung without fatigue so 
often as a lower one, any more than we 
could exercise any other muscle to ex- 
treme and not suffer for it. 

To sum up briefly, the argument of this 
paper is that to educate a pupil he must 
receive a definite and pure conception of 
the end he is striving to reach ; this striv- 
ing brings into play certain activities 
which must be directed in one and the 
same way every time each special activity 
is used, and during the continuance re- 
main unimpeded and unimpaired ; perfec- 
tion in detail refines the original concep- 
tion, which in turn adds to the ease of 
each special act ; power and skill only 
come from frequent repetition ; expres- 
sion is only to be obtained when the mind 
and muscle are in such perfect repose and 
so plastic .that every phase of activity de- 
manded by the will may be instantan- 
eously reproduced in muscular life ; mind 
dominates matter and should receive the 
primary attention. 



Prohibition Meeting. 

The Prohibition Club held their first 
meeting for this term on the evening of 
the 2d inst. 

After the singing of an opening hymn 



and prayer by Rev. Artz, several ad- 
dresses on various subjects were delivered 
by members of the club. G. K. Hartman 
gave an interesting account of the Pro. 
hibition Convention held at Elmira, N. Y. 

Chas. Wingerd then rendered a dec-lam- 
ation entitled " A Yivid Illustration," 
after which S. F. Huber discussed " The 
State Control of Saloons." 

Some general remarks on Prohibition 
were then made by Rev. Artz. Prohibi- 
tion songs were rendered at suitable inter- 
vals throughout the exercises. 

Quite a number of friends were present 
who are not members of the club, and we 
consider that our first meeting was a suc- 
cess in every respect. We would gladly 
see as many of our friends as possibly 
can attend our meetings, as it is our pur- 
pose to create a stronger Prohibition 
sentiment among the students, as well as 
in the town of Annville and vicinity. On 
the evening of the 4th inst. our club re- 
ceived a call for speakers to supply the 
place of Prof. Patton at Fontana, about 
four miles from town. The professor was 
unable to meet his engagement at that 
place, and Revs. Hartman and Albert 
promptly responded to the call to fill his 
place. 

Other members of the club supplied the 
music, and a pleasant, and we hope a 
a profitable evening was spent. 

Three new members, Messrs. Boyer, 
Beattie and Albert, have joined the club. 
All the members are enthusiastic and de- 
termined workers, and we hope that good 
results may attend their efforts. 



The Lecture Course. 

The lecture committee of the P. L. S. 
have decided upon the course for the en- 
suing year. This is the tenth course the 
society will bring before the public, and 
to make this one a success the patronage 
of the public is solicited. None but the 
best talent was obtained by the committee; 
hence all should avail themselves of the 
rare opportunity to attend such a course. 
The course will open on November 3, by 
The Amphion Ladies' Quartette, consist- 
ing of mandolin, guitar and vocal music 
The company comprises Misses Laving 
Sutcliffe, First Soprano and guitar, Elsie 
F. Snedeker, Second Soprano and mando- 
lin ; Isabella F. Mundell, First Alto and 
mandolin, and M. Louise Mundell, Second 
Alto and mandola. Their success as ft 



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THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



53 



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vocal quartette and as soloists has been 
phenomenal, and with their extensive 
repetoire of popular and classical music 
they have gained a reputation which is 
unsurpassed 

On December 1st Walter Pelham, who 
is commonly known as connected with 
Harper's Weekly and Young People, will 
render one of his brilliant entertainments 
of mirth, music and mimicry. Mr. Pel- 
ham has been on the platform for the last 
thirteen years, and has appeared before 
the Prince and Princess of "Wales, Mary 
of Cambridge, a brilliant assemblage at 
Windsor Castle, and many other distin- 
guished personages both of England and 
America. Among the numerous imperson- 
ations rendered is a marvellous imitation 
of Artemus Ward, the prince of American 
humorists, in his celebrated lecture, " Ar- 
temus Ward Among the Mormons." 

January 17th. — Dr. Samuel Phelps Le- 
land will deliver his renowned lecture on 
"World Making." Dr. Leland has been 
before the public for a number of years, 
and has been recalled to some places 
twice in a season. Dr. Leland has a num- 
ber of testimonials similar to this : " Dr. 
Leland's was the most solid and valuable 
one of the course. The universal expres- 
sion was one of unbounded satisfaction." 

February 22d.— The New York Ideal 
Concert Company will render one of their 
delightful and entertaining concerts. The 
company consists of Miss Agnes E. 
Bowen, soprano and whistler; Miss 
Blanche L. Frederici, reciter ; Miss Bessie 
Mecklem, saxophone soloist ; and H. C. 
Mecklem, harp soloist. Miss Mecklem is 
the only lady saxophone soloist in 
America, and Mr. Mecklem is the leading 
harpist of New York city. Miss Frederici 
is a charming elocutionist, and is ranked 
among the leading elocutionists of the 
country. Miss Bowen always delights the 
audience with her marvellous whistling. 

March nth.—" Judge " Wm. B. Green 
w ill render one of his superib entertain- 
ments consisting of humor, pathos and 
sentiment. 

"Judge" Green has won for himself an 
^viable reputation and has been reen- 
gaged to the same place a number of times, 
fa Brooklyn " Judge " G reen has appeared 
111 three hundred and five engagements, 
w hich is a sufficient reputation. The com- 
mittee has not enhanced the price for sea- 
8 °n tickets and will offer the course of five 
^tertainments for $1.T5. 



An Address 




Delivered at the Recent Session of the East Penn. 
sylvania Annual Conference, held at Steeltcm, 
October 14, 1893, by Hiram K. Steinmetz, 
A. 31., Class of 1874. 

It gives me pleasure at all times to 
speak a kind word for Lebanon Valley 
College, and if I should fail to do so I 
would be guilty of an act of base ingrati- 
tude. As the interests of the College are 
to be discussed by the Conference, I feel 
it my duty to present some facts in her 
behalf. 

Entering that institution just as I en- 
tered my teens brought me in connection 
with her during her early struggles, diffi- 
culties and obstacles, thus giving me more 
information in regard to her history than 
many possess. I have ever watched her 
career with no little degree of anxiety and 
interest. 

While a student at college my sainted 
mother was called home to heaven. Many 
prayers did she offer in my behalf. Many 
words of sound advice did she give me, 
bidding me to lead a Christian life. Leb- 
anon Valley College became a second 
mother to me. She gave me not only 
mental training and discipline, but, what 
is of far more value than that, within 
those sacred -walls I was taught the way 
of everlasting life. Praise God for it! 
Scores of young ladies and gentlemen who 
have been connected with the College 
have had the same blessed experience. 
Surely Lebanon Yalley College has not 
lived in vain ! 

How well do I remember the prayer- 
meetings, the class-meetings, and the 
revival seasons ! Upon one occasion the 
boarding students were all Christians 
with but one exception. 

The College has done a grand and noble 
work for God and his cause, ever incul- 
cating principles of vital godliness and 
experimental religion. 

Nearly two hundred persons have 
graduated there. Six of this number are 
now with God and his angels, and are 
looking down upon us as we are here as- 
sembled, beseeching us to act wisely in 
behalf of their Alma Mater. Thirty-four 
are ministers of the gospel located in dif- 
ferent parts of the country, not only in 
our own church, but also in other denomi- 
nations. They are battling for God and 
his cause, bringing hundreds of souls into 
the vineyard of the Lord, making a 
record for themselves which reflects great 



54 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



credit on their Alma Mater. Thirteen 
occupy a professor's chair in some insti- 
tution of learning from the shores of the 
Atlantic to the Golden Gates of the 
Pacific, teaching and inculcating the prin- 
ciples of Christian Philosophy, Science 
and Arts, blessing hundreds and thous- 
ands of their fellow-men and women. 
Surely Lebanon Valley College has not 
lived in vain. Twenty-three are following 
the teacher's profession, either in the 
capacity of a public or private teacher, 
thus blessing many and wielding an in- 
fluence, the greatness of which eternity 
alone can reveal. 

A number of the gentler sex are attend- 
ing to the duties of wife and mother ; and 
by a strange coincidence an equal number 
are either engaged in study, engaged to 
wed or engaged in the art of trying to wed. 

We also find among the Alumni of the 
College doctors, lawyers and editors, who 
fill their various positions creditably and 
well ; who are doing an incalculable 
amount of good, and who can justly as- 
cribe the honor to their Alma Mater in 
preparing them for the stern realities of 
life. 

Over a score are engaged in the busi- 
ness world, and thus realize the advan- 
tages obtained by a thorough mental 
training. They are succeeding well in 
life, and are an honor to the commuity in 
which they live. Six are engaged in that 
noblest and most independent calling of 
the agriculturist, thus being enabled to 
study more fully nature and nature's God. 
Thus in every calling in life, in Church 
and in State, the graduates of Lebauon 
Yalley College are doing a noble work for 
God and the country. And not the grad- 
uates only, but many young men and 
women who at one time were students at 
the College are doing just as noble work. 
Of the forty fields of labor in this Confer- 
ence nineteen are filled by former students 
of the College. The same can be said of 
the cooperating Conferences. Many are 
the young men and women who at one time 
or another were students at the College, 
who are filling honorable positions in life 
and laboring zealously for the upbuilding 
of the Redeemer's kingdom. Grand and 
noble as the record of the College is, a 
still more glorious future awaits her, pro- 
vided we as a Church do our duty. Did 
I say provided? Yes. What, then, is 
our duty ? Clear the College of the last 
vestige of debt ! Endow it largely, so that 



all who seek an education, rich or poor, 
may obtain it. 

Can this be done ? Yes, in fact it must 
be done, if we as a Church want to live 
and prosper. 

We must educate our 3 r oung people in 
our own colleges. 

We have the wealth in the Church to 
do it. 

God will call us into account if we fail 
to do our duty. Neglected opportunities, 
how often we would recall them. " Ye 
knew your duty but ye did it not," will 
be the answer of Almighty God. 

We are not better Christians than any 
other churches, but just as good. We are 
not wealthier than other churches, but just 
as wealthy. 

Only a few weeks ago an educational 
institution of a sister church, located less 
than a hundred miles from here, received 
a large donation, not for endowment, but 
for the contingent fund. The same insti- 
tution is heavily endowed. Why cannot 
somebody do likewise for our College. 
The Bible tells us, " He who hath this 
world's goods and seeth his brother have 
need and shutteth the bowels of compas- 
sion on him, how dwelleththe love of God 
in him." Yea it cannot, that is plain, but 
true, every word of it. Lebanon Yalley 
College is our brother, our sister, our father, 
our mother. If we fail to support her by 
our influence, by giving of our means, 
even if we must practice self-denial, con- 
tributing until all debt is paid and a large 
endowment fund is created, I say if we 
fail to do this, we justly merit the dis- 
pleasure of Almighty Gocl. I have often 
wished I possessed the power or the means 
to cancel the debt of Lebanon Yalley Col- 
lege, or better yet, be able to give her a 
large endowment fund. This would be 
the crowning event of my life. 

Brethren, my heart beats warmly for 
Lebanon Yalley College. I want to see 
her free of debt, and that speedily, richly 
endowed, larger buildings erected, larger 
library, laboratory and apparatus added. 
All this can be accomplished. Let the 
clergy and the laity throughout the co- 
operating Conferences awake to the fact 
and do their duty in this matter. Now is 
the time to act ; there is danger in delay- 
There has been too much neglect and in- 
difference manifested in the past. Let us 
arouse from our lethargy. If we accom- 
plish this, the College will be in a position 
to command the attention of the people 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



n5 



throughout the length and breadth of the 
land, by holding a position of the highest 
rank of the educational institutions in the 
country. 

God grant that this will be done, and 
that speedily. Then Lebanon Yalley Col- 
lege will have an opportunity to achieve 
success and accomplish the work God has 
designed for her, and receive the blessing 
of hundreds, yea thousands of young men 
and women, yea be a burning and shining 
light throughout all ages. 



"Let There Be Light." 

According to the nebular hypothesis, 
millions of years ago there floated in 
space a mass of matter, " without form 
and void," which was destined by the 
Almighty to become a world — the earth. 
Nearly six thousand years ago this shape- 
less mass began to assume form in the 
darkness, and the Lord of the Universe 
planted his foot upon it and in tones of 
thunder broke the awful silence by ex- 
claiming, " Let There Be Light," And 
There was Light;" the glorious orb of 
heaven shone forth upon a new-born world. 

In a few days when the earth was 
clothed in verdure, the eternal hills and 
valleys had been arranged, the rivers 
flowed in their courses and animal life 
was created, God created man in his own 
image. No sooner was man left alone 
than he began to seek new light — intel- 
lectual lio;ht. 

He was forbidden to taste of the tree 
*of the knowledge of good and evil, but 
being tempted with the promise of satan 
that he should become as God, he yielded 
and thus brought untold sorrow upon the 
human race. Since that time man has been 
crying out through the darkness for light. 

For four thousand years the world 
passed through periods of spiritual dark- 
ness and light, until finally it became en- 
shrouded in the dark robe of sin and 
despair, and cried out : for a ray of 
n gbt ! God heard the mournful cry and 
sent His only begotten Son into the world 
as a light to dispel the gloom. To-daj' 
this son of righteousness shines in the 
w orld as no other enlightning influence 
u nder the heavens. 

Ancient Greece and Rome sought light 
through wars, revolutions and the physi- 
Ca l culture of man. They sometimes found 
an intellectual light in their philosophers 
ail d writers ; but how often the glimmer- 



ings of their knowledge were extinguished 
in human blood ! How many Alexandrian 
libraries were destroyed by savage war- 
riors ! How often the pall of night was 
cast over the rising sun of science, and 
the human race thrown back into the 
depths of barbarism ! After the fall of 
the Roman Empire nearly every vestige 
of science, every monument of art, and 
every trace of civilization, was completely 
obliterated. Wave after wave of unmiti- 
gated barbarism rolled over the face of 
Europe and for several centuries made the 
darkness complete. Yet in the breast of 
man was deeply and firmly planted the 
germ of intellectual resurrection which is 
ever ready to spring forth when nour- 
ished by favorable opportunities. 

About the beginning of the sixteenth 
century, Christianity had been crushed by 
Romanism ; the doctrine of indulgences 
and penance had revolved itself in the 
mind of Martin Luther, until one day, 
while climbing the steps of the monastery 
on his knees, he seemed to hear, as it 
were, a voice from heaven saying : " The 
just shall live by faith." He arose; he 
set to work about writing the theses, 
which he nailed on the door of All Saints' 
church, and then began preaching the 
Reformation. It is through this "great 
work that we have the light and liberty of 
the gospel which we enjoy to-day. 

In the critical period of American his- 
tory, when the colonists were oppressed 
by England, there arose light out of the 
darkness which dispelled the gloom. 
Patrick Henry, in thrilling words, de- 
manded the light of liberty or the dark- 
ness of the tomb. Thousands of lives 
were sacrificed on the Martian altar for 
liberty, and to-day we are enabled to point 
with pride to the Declaration of Inde- 
pendence, to the statue in New York har- 
bor representing " Liberty Enlightening 
the World," to the American eagle, the 
Star-Spangled Banner, and to the Bible, 
which are the emblems of liberty. 

There was another period of darkness 
within the memory of many of us — the 
period of American Slavery — when the 
intellectual darkness of the slave was to 
be compared with his natural color. In 
the midst of the struggle for light — the 
great Civil War — Abraham Lincoln sent 
out the Emancipation Proclamation, and 
by that said : " Let there be light." The 
war continued, brave men fought, bled, 
and died, until at Appomattox Court 



56 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



House, Grant drew aside the curtain and 
let the glorious light of American liberty 
shine upon us. 

We are living in an elightened age. 
True, we have not been able to discover a 
few of the lost arts of the Egyptians, but 
we have countless numbers of modern in- 
ventions, which are of more use to man- 
kind than the art of embalming the dead 
or erecting the colossal Pj^ramids. 

But we have not reached our zenith — 
our climax is not complete. Wherein 
shall we become more enlightened ? " We 
must educate." 

In the mind of many a man whose time 
is devoted to tilling the soil for a scanty 
subsistence, there slumber powers, which, 
had they been developed by early disci- 
pline, would have elevated their possessor 
to the first rank of philosopher or states- 
man ; and many a mechanic who goes 
patiently the round of unvaried toil is un- 
consciously the owner of faculties, which, 
nurtured and expanded by education, 
would have enabled him to electrify 
Senates, and to win that preeminence 
which men award to genius. 

Instruction is to man what culture is to 
the plant, and when deprived of this, his 
powers remain wholly latent, or, like the 
uncultivated plant, are worthless. Ignor- 
ance is the darkness of night in which man 
slumbers away an unprofitable and miser- 
able life — a darkness which the rays of 
knowledge must disperse before he will 
awake to exercise and rise to improvement. 

It is a cold and cheerless state in which 
the finer sensibilities and feelings of the 
human soul are locked up, and man is de- 
prived of the enjoyment which results 
from their exercise and perfection. 

Intellectual development is not an in- 
stantaneous work, but a progressive one. 
A diamond may be centuries in forming, 
other crystals may be formed in a mo- 
ment ; the diamond is almost indestructi- 
ble, the other may be made to perish in an 
instant. 

There is a fixed law in nature which 
causes that which has been suddenly ac- 
quired, whether reputation or fortune, to 
soon vanish. He who suddenly becomes 
popular, and is content with his popular- 
ity, shall in a moment be forgotten. So 
real intellectual worth can ou\y be attained 
by hard and continuous efforts 

If then we would see the foundations on 
which the fabric of our county's liberties 
shall rest to the remotest generations, if 



we would see her carry forward the work 
of political reformation and the bright and 
morning star rise over a benighted world, 
let us elevate the intellectual and moral 
character of every class of our citizens; 
and let us instil into them thoroughly the 
principles of the Christian religion. 

The world even in this enlightened age 
is crying for more light. We need more 
master minds like those of Edison, Glad- 
stone and the departed Blaine. How are 
we to get them ? " We Must Educate." 
They must be educated in our colleges. 

The thick ranks of the great army of 
mankind are marching over the fields of 
time to great conflicts and the rewards of 
eternity. They march to the music of 
thought, and lie who makes the loudest 
and best music will have the most fol- 
lowers. We are not to elevate a few by 
depressing the many, but to seek the 
greatest good to the greatest number; 
this must be brought about by educating 
the masses. Never in the history of the 
world have educated men and women been 
so much in demand as they are now. 

The thundering of cannon and the 
crack of rifles can quell mobs, but educa- 
tion prevents them. Superstition and 
bigotry cry out against increased illumina- 
tion, but when, the twentieth century is 
ushered upon us, our intellectual light will 
compare with that of our forefathers as 
the modern electric light with their candle. 

But not until the means of education 
everywhere throughout our countiy shall 
be as free as the air we breathe, until 
every family shall have the Bible for its 
guiding-star, shall we exert our proper 
influence in the cause of our fellow-men. 
And we shall not have reached our goal 
until all the scattered elements of good, 
which lie concealed in the material world 
shall have been discovered, collected, com- 
bined, and amplified to their fullest extent, 
until all portions of the moral and intel- 
lectual domains shall have reached their 
highest culture, until the knowledge of 
every attainable law in the universe shall 
have enlightened and expanded the human 
understanding and secured the universal 
fealty of our race, until man shall have 
achieved every conquest of which his 
nature is capable, over himself and the 
visible world, over mind and matter- 
then, and not till then, will we see the 
light of intelligence and Christian civiliza- 
tion in all its brilliancy and glory. 

J. H. Maysilles, '95. 



THE COLLEGE FOR U3I. 



57 



College Directory. 
Faculty. 

E. BENJ. BIERMAN, A. M., Ph. D., 

PRESIDENT, 

Professor of Mental and Moral Science. 
H. CLAY DEANER, A. M., 
Professor of the Latin Language. 
JOHN E. LEHMAN, A. M., 
Professor of Mathematics. 
Rev. JNO. A. McDERMAD, A. M., 
Professor of the Greek Language. 
JOHN A. SHOTT, Ph. B., 
Professor of Natural Science. 
MARY E. SLEICHTER, A. B., 
Professor of English Literature. 

CARRIE M. FLINT, 
Professor of Instrumental Music. 
GERTRUDE ALBERTSON. 
Professor of Harmony and Fine Art. 
HARVEY D. MILLER, B. S., 
Teacher of the Violin. 

Literary Societies. 

CLIONIAN. 
Miss ANNA E. WILSON, President. 
Miss ELLA PENNYPACKER, Secretary. 
EALOZETEAN. 
SHERIDAN GARMAN, President. 
GEO. A. L. KINDT, Secretary. 
PHILOKOSMIAN. 
D. S. ESHLEMAN, President. 
GEO. H. STEIN, Secretary. 
Y. M. C. A. 
GEO. K. HARTMAN, President. 
HARRY W. MAYER, Secretary. 
T. W. C. A. 
Miss MAGGIE STRICKLER, 
Miss ESTELLA STEHMAN. 



Pkilokosmian Literary Society. 



Esse Quam Videri. 



Our school days pass by very rapidly. 
We can scarcely realize that more than a 
Bjonth of this term is already gone. 
Nevertheless, it has been a very profitable 
°ne for the society. Every member 
seems to take a very active interest in the 
Work. The literary performances are 
With very few exceptions ably rendered, 
"he debates, particularly, are spirited and 
closely contested. Unusual life is being 
Manifested in every department of societv 
Work. 



During the past month the names of 
six young men have been added to our 
list of members. They are the following : 
Messrs. Hoverter, Wallace, Yoe, Henry, 
Boyer and Beattie. 

Among those who visited us during 
the month were the following : Prof. Mc- 
Dermad, Rev. Spayd and Wife, Misses 
Brightbill, Walmer and Cowling and 
Messrs. Smith, Henry, Berr, Sheets, 
Saylor and Backastoe. 

On the 25th ult., H. E. Runkel started 
upon a trip to Chicago, where he will 
remain for about two weeks enjoying the 
sights that are to be seen at the Colum- 
bian Exposition. 

Among the prominent features of society 
work are con-joint sessions with the 
Clionian Literary Societ}-. Such a ses- 
sion will be held on the evening of the 
27th inst. A special programme has 
been prepared for the occasion and a 
pleasant time is anticipated. 

The belief seems to be prevalent among 
our numbers that co-education is advan- 
tageous when applied to literary societies 
as well as to the recitations in the class 
room. 



Kalozetean Literary Society. 



Palma non sine pulvere. 



Owing to the fact that the new editor 
was not acquainted with the ways of this 
journal, the items for last month were too 
late. We hope to do better from this 
time on. 

Mr. H. H. Sloat, '93, has secured a po- 
sition as teacher at Rockport, Carbon 
county ; he writes and says he is well 
pleased. 

Mr. S. Evers, '91, has entered the theo- 
logical department of Yale University. 
It seems to 4*s that we may yet expect 
great things of our friend. 

Mr. J. F. Zug, '94, who spent last year 
at Mt. Morris College, 111., has returned 
and intends graduating this year. He 
has many wonderful tales to tell of the 
far West. 

Mr. H. W. Mayer, '95, spent a week at 
the World's Fair this month. He reports 
a good time, and says it is hard to settle 
down to work again. 

Messrs. Pennypacker and Gable, who 
were with us last year, have entered 
Franklin and Marshall College; we are 



I 



58 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



sorry to lose them, but wish them all suc- 
cess in their new fields of work. 

Mr. David Buddinger, who contemplates 
entering the ministry, has joined us, and 
w r e expect more to follow. 

We take this opportunity to ask our 
ex-members not to forget us. We would 
be very glad to hear from you. It always 
makes us feel more like going on when we 
hear words of encouragement from our 
former members. 



Our Alumni. 

'70. It is currently reported that Mrs- 
John R. Reitzel (Mary A. Weiss) and 
husband are making preparations to visit 
Palestine and the Holy Land early the 
coming winter and spend several years 
there and in other lands of the Orient. 

'73. Henry B. Stehman, A. M., M. D., 
was recently elected to a professorship in 
Rush Medical College, Chicago. 

'87, Rev. John L. Keedy, who com- 
pleted the theological course at Yale last 
spring, has returned for another year, 
having won a prize which gives him a 
year of special work. After he had 
matriculated on entering Yale the Dean 
said to him that he would have to study to 
maintain the record of the L. V. C. boys. 
He has nobly done it. 

'88, Miss Sallie Mark, of Boston, is vis- 
iting friends in Lebanon, Pa. 

'88, Miss Alice Kutz, of Newville, Pa., 
visited Miss Mary M. Shenk on the 7th 
inst., and spent a week. On the 20th of 
next month she will return to Freeburg, 
Pa., where she enters upon her third year 
as teacher of music in Freeburg Academy. 

'88. Rev. Joseph K. Wagner, B. S., has 
accepted a call from the TJ. B. congrega- 
tion at Russell, Kansas, and at the recent 
session of the East Pennsylvania Confer- 
ence took his transfer to the Northwestern 
Kansas Conference. * 

'91. Miss Ella N. Saylor has resumed 
her work in the N. E. Conservatory of 
Music in Boston, Mass. 

'92. Hervin U. Roop, A. B., professor 
in the State Normal School at Shippens- 
burg, was admitted to membership of East 
Pennsylvania Conference at its recent ses- 
sion in Steelton. 

'93. Harry H. Sloat has recently taken 
charge of one of the public schools of 
Carbon county. 

'93, Miss Elvire Stehman, in company 
with her father, spent the first part of this 



month admiring the aesthetic and artistic 
at the World's Fair. 



Personals and Locals. 

Mr. John M. Smeltzer, of Myerstown r 
Pa., entered College as a classical Fresh- 
man on the 9th inst. 

John R. Wallace, '95, has won quite a 
reputation for his original stories. They 
are teeming with pathos and humor. 

Miss Loose, who spent a week at the 
World's Fair during September, has re- 
sumed her work. 

Miss Mary A. Zug, of Lebanon, Pa., 
who attended College during '87, has gone 
to her church school at Mt. Morris to com- 
plete the Teachers' course. 

The Tennis Club have beautified their 
courts under suggestions from its Presi- 
dent and Prof. Shott. 

The first public of the Junior rhetorical 
will be given on November 11. 

The Freshmen have placed their names 
high on cupola of the College. The flag 
of '97 floated to the breeze, but now looks 
sad. 

What Freshman takes his siesta in the 
forenoon in the campus? He dormit near 
the Tennis grounds. 

Willie Wyand, a former student from 
Keedysville, Md., was married on the 11th 
inst to Miss Fannie Davis, of Rockville. 

Messrs. Hartman and Huber will attend 
the W. M. C. A. Convention at Wilkes- 
Barre, from the 19th to the 22d inst. 

Messrs. Runkle, Hoverter and Maysilles 
on the evening of 17th inst. attended a 
sociable in Lebanon, Pa. 

The Tennis Club of Hummelstown has 
accepted the challenge given by our club, 
and the contest will take- place on our 
grounds Saturday, the 28th inst. 

W. H. Kreider, '94, attended the Fred- 
erick Fair. He praises the hospitality of 
the Maryland puellarum. 

D. S. Eshleman, '94, did not take work 
at the last Conference. He will devote 
his entire time to his work in College. 

Rev. M. J. Mumma visited the College 
on the 20th inst. 

Rev. Chas. Rhoads, of Philadelphia, 
has been re-elected president of the Chris- 
tian Endeavor Society at its recent meet- 
ing in Reading. He was a student at the 
College. 

Miss Lavinia Isett, niece of Mrs. Bier- 
man, has entered College in the depart- 
ment of music. 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



59 



Mr. Maurice Bowman, of Royersford, 
Pa., visited his sister on ltth inst., and 
accompanied the students on their " chest- 
nut picnic." 

Mr. Chas. Saylor and Mrs. Mary E. Im- 
boclen (Bowman) were married on the 
17th inst. The services were performed 
in the beautiful new home of the bride- 
groom, on East Main street, in the pres- 
ence of the immediate families. 

The class in beginning Latin is one of 
the largest for many years. 

Miss Albertson has a very interesting 
class in Elocution. Their recent effort on 
the rostrum showed marked progress. 

The Teachers' Institute of Lebanon 
County will be held from November 20 to 
25. A special feature will be the drill of 
teachers. 

Mr. C. E. Flook, editor of the Guide, 
attended the October meeting of the 
Executive Committee. 

The first musical recital of the term was 
largely attended. The performers did 
excellently/ They will be given monthly. 

The Base Ball Club has not been very 
active this term. They are husbanding 
their strength for the spring exhibitions. 



Christian Association Notes. 

The Social Reception, which was given 
by the Y. W. C. A. and Y. M. C. A. to 
the students and members of the Faculty, 
was greatly enjoyed by all present. 

Two classes in Bible Study have been 
organized under the direction of the Y. 
M. C. A. The one in Practical Bible 
Study meets on Sunday afternoon ; the 
other is using Stalker's Life of Christ, and 
meets on Monday evening. G. K. Hart- 
man has charge of the classes. 

Special services appropriate to the Day 
of Prayer for Young Women were held 
here. Miss Sleichter was in charge of 
the meeting. 

G. K. Hartman and S. F. Huber will 
represent the Y. M. C. A. at the State 
Convention, which meets at Wilkes-Barre, 
October 19th-22d. 

Misses Sleichter, Flint and Strickler 
expect to attend the Y. W. C. A. State 
Convention at Lancaster, November 4th 
a nd 5th, as the delegates from the College 
Association. 

The membership of the Y. M. C. A. has 
increased considerably. The new mem- 
bers are taking part in the meetings and 
taking themselves generally at home in 
the work. 



Y. M. C. A. State Convention. 

The 26th Annual Convention was one 
of the most successful ones ever held in 
this State. 

It was held at Wilkes-Barre, October 
19th to 22d. The incoming trains brought 
delegates from all directions until the 
number almost reached four hundred. 
The ladies of the First M. E. Church 
served an excellent dinner at the Asso- 
ciation building to all who came on the 
I morning or noon trains. The opening 
session began at 3:30 p. m. Ex-Governor 
James A. Beaver was elected President of 
the Convention. He is an able, energetic 
presiding officer who knows what to do 
and when to do it. He is President of 
the Bellefonte Association and a member 
of the State Committee. 

All the delegates took supper together, 
at a large hall close to the Association 
building, as the guests of the Wilkes- 
Barre Association. The evening session 
was devoted to an informal conference for 
comparison of experiences and a careful 
csnsideration of the past year's work. 
The meeting was deeply impressive and 
doubtless will tell on the work of the new 
year upon which we have entered. 

A very helpful topic which was dis- 
cussed on Friday was " What do Our 
Associations Most Need? " It was emi- 
nently practical, and responses were given 
by many delegates who represented the 
general, college and railroad work. In- 
teresting and instructive Bible Studies 
were conducted during the sessions of the 
Convention by S. D. Gordon, State Sec- 
retary of Ohio ; J. W. Dean, " The 
Quaker Evangelist," and Robert E. Speer. 
of New York. 

E. L. Shuey, of Dayton, Ohio, read a 
most excellentpaper on " Possibilities of 
the Educational Work of the Associa- 
tions," which called forth many words of 
warm commendation. He also made a 
telling address at the Student's Confer- 
ence. Evidently he is very much inter- 
ested in all departments of Y. M. C. A. 
work. At the close of the afternoon ses- 
sion on Friday the College delegates 
marched to the residence of Mr. and Mrs. 
H. T. Atherton, where we were most 
hospitably entertained. We enjo}-ed the 
tempting viands prepared for the inner 
man, and a pleasant social time and an 
instructive college conference. The work 
among railroad men was a prominent 
feature on Friday evening, and the differ- 



60 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



ent phases of College Association work 
were ably presented on Saturday evening. 
The Opera House was crowded during 
the Men's Gospel Meeting on Sunday 
afternoon. It was effective in leading a 
number of persons to desire an interest 
in the Lamb of Calvary. It was densely 
packed during the farewell services in 
the evening. The year text for this vear 
is Isa. 63 : 19, We Are Thine. 

G. K. Hartman. 



Reviews. 

The Latin and High School Review of 
Cambridge, Mass., Gas, published by the 
National Normal University, Lebanon, 
C.and the High School Calendar, Buffalo, 
N. Y., are new exchanges. 

Some of our exchanges gave us very 
favorable words of commendation on the 
improved appearance of our paper. 

San Joaquin Valley College Ensign, 
was one of our early exchanges last 
month. Miss Alice Gingrich is Professor 
in Music at that institution. 

The Ossarist contains a cut of Rev. W. 
M. Yates, the new Acting President of 
Findlay College. 

Rev. Yates is a young man, a graduate 
of Findlay College and a native of the 
Keystone State. 

The Otterbein Aegis contains the open- 
ing address which was delivered at that 
institution by Rev. W. 0. Fries, an 
Alumni of Lebanon Valley College. It 
will bear careful reading and thoughtful 
meditation. 

The September number of many of our 
former exchanges have not yet reached us. 



The Chestnut Picnic. 

The Junior Chestnut Picnic was held at 
Mt. Gretna on the 1 8th inst. After prayers 
on the day before, Mr. Maysilles extended 
an invitation to faculty and students to 
join them at Ladies' Hall, where teams 
would be in readiness to accommodate all. 
An applause followed that bespoke a 
hearty acceptance. 

At 7 o'clock the merry crowd left amid 
class } r ells, songs, etc. The journey was 
much enjoyed. Many air castles were 
built; bushels of chestnuts in imagine 
were to be gathered. On reaching the 
park, the hunt began. Chestnuts large 
and chestnuts fat, how they made our 
hearts go pitty-pat. Thanks, thanks, kind 
Juniors for supplying them. The day was 



spent in games, boating and visiting the 
sights. Prof. McDermad replied to the 
toast " Our Juniors." The mountain air 
gave all good appetites for the repast 
which had been prepared. 

A unique idea was the presentation of a 
badge by the Juniors to each one, in their 
class colors, which was worn as a souvenir 
of the day. Not till the stars were shin- 
ing, did we return. A more enjoyable 
chestnut picnic was never spent. Thanks 
to '95 for all your kindness. 

A Blossom Study. 

What can be more beautiful than the 
bridal veil which nature casts over the 
fruit trees in the opening spring? An 
old apple-tree, with its gnarled branches 
crowned with its exquisite blossoms of 
radiant purity, touched here and there 
with the rosy fingers of spring, it would 
seem as if nature out of her overwhelming 
wealth and wanton fulness of life had so 
lavishly glorified the bare boughs, and 
yet any botanist will tell us the contrary. 

Blossoms impby poverty of conditions. 
They would have become leaves had not 
nature specialized them for the purpose of 
reproducing the species. It is because 
the blossoms are beset with limitations, 
and crippled in their efforts to become 
foliage, that they are the dainty S3^mpho- 
nies of color and fragrance which rejoice 
the eye while they endure, and afterward 
fulfil their mission by being transformed, 
in the wonderful alchemy of nature, into 
the fruit, which is a seed-vessel containing 
the embryo for another life. If the leafy 
branch had not been interrupted and 
limited in its progress, it would have 
become merely foliage ; but by reason of 
the poverty of conditions which were 
necessary for this growth, it became a 
blossom and then fruit, thus giving up its 
own individuality that it might become a 
means of reproducing many other trees 
by its seeds. 

Is there not a message for us in this 
spring symphony of blossom? Nature 
never breaks laws, but carries out per- 
fectly all of the Creator's purposes. 

Self-sacrifice, disappointment, limita- 
tions in the tree, make it more beautiful, 
and its culminating glory is when it gives 
up its own purposes and is thwarted into 
blossom. 

Do we realize that it is only through 
pain and disappointment and loss that we 
reach the deepest meanings and the 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



61 



highest purposes of life ? Our plans are 
so fair that it is hard to believe that, if 
we could have carried them out, we should 
have become nothing but leaves, and when 
repression and loss comes, we let the 
poverty of our conditions dwarf and 
stunt our spiritual growth, instead of 
producing the beautiful blossoms of sub- 
mission, trust, and living for others, 
which might have been the very crown of 
our lives. — Sunday-school Times. 

Rev. D. S. Early's Knock-Down Reply 
to Cardinal McCloskey. 

(Published by Editor.) 

In December, 1878, D. S. Early, General 
Agent of the IT. B. Mutual Aid Society, 
was sent to Augusta, Maine, to confer 
with the Insurance Commissioner as to 
the admission of the Society to do busi- 
ness in that State. In Portland he was 
joined by Mr. B. L. Chadbourne, of East- 
port, Maine, who was to accompany him 
to Augusta in the interests of the Society. 

Being seated together in the car, soon 
after the train pulled out from Boston, 
Mr. E. and Mr. C. engaged in conversa- 
tion, and ere long, by request of Mr. C, 
Mr. E. commenced to explain to him the 
origin and creed of the Church of the 
United Brethren in Christ. Being a very 
energetic and demonstrative talker, Mr. 
Early's manner attracted the attention of 
nearly all in the car, and especially of an 
elderly, clerical looking gentleman who 
sat in the next seat behind them, who 
happened to be (although Mr. Early did 
not know it) none other than Cardinal 
McCloskey, of New York. In the course 
of his remarks, Mr. Early spoke in com- 
mendable terms of some of the peculiari- 
ties of the church of his choice, and 
pointed out its superiority in doctrine on 
certain points. 

But in the midst of his earnest conver- 
sation, Cardinal McCloskey interrupted 
him by saying : " Yes, my friend, but 
how do you know that your church is 
right ? " This, from an entire stranger, 
rather took Mr. E. off his pins ; but, re- 
covering himself he turned to the Cardinal, 
in blissful ignorance as to the greatness 
of the man whom he was now addressing, 
and began to assign reasons for believing 
that his church was right. But as he 
assigned one reason after another, the 
Cardinal would always reply: "Yes, my 
friend, but how do you know that your 
church is right ? " and thus succeeded in 



making it, for the time, quite warm for 
Mr. Early. By this time nearly all the 
passengers in the car (many of whom, in- 
cluding Mr. Chadbourne, knew the Car- 
dinal) were noticing with much interest 
and amusement what seemed to be a very 
unequal contest. 

Finally, in his attempt at giving a 
reason for believing that his church was 
right, Mr. E. referred to Martin Luther 
as an authority. But, at once the Car- 
dinal replied by saying : " Yes my friend, 
but how do you know that Martin Luther 
was right ? " This was too much for Mr- 
E. It raised his Pennsylvania Dutch 
blood ; and, rising to his feet, and turning 
around so as to look the Cardinal square 
in the face, he said in a very loud voice 
and with great emphasis, the eyes of all 
in the car now fastened upon him : " Well 
sir, since you have asked me that ques- 
tion, I will just tell you how I do know 
that Martin Luther was right. I know 
he was right because of what he did. 
There was the old Pope and all his Car- 
dinals and Bishops and Priests and all 
the Kings and armies of Europe on the 
one side, and there was nobody but little 
Martin Luther and God Almighty on the 
other side ; and little Martin Luther just 
took that old Pope's bull by the horns, 
and gave his neck such a twist as he will 
never get over until Gabriel blows his 
horn, and sends the old Pope with all his 
Cardinals, Bishops and Priests down to 
hell where they belong. That, sir is the 
way I know he was right." The last sen- 
tence he roared out at the top of his 
voice, and with its completion, all the 
passengers in the car clapped their hands, 
cheered and burst into roars of laughter. 

Soon the train stopped, and the Car- 
dinal, having reached his destination, left 
the car, but before doing so he gave Mr. 
Early a hearty shake of the hand, said he 
was glad they had met and complimented 
his pluck and shrewdness. When Mr. 
Chadbourne informed Mr. E. that he had 
been talking to Cardinal McCloskey, he 
was somewhat stunned ; but, recovering 
himself, he remarked in his characteristic 
way : " Well, I don't care if I did handle 
him a little roughly ; he interrupted us in 
our conversation, and when a man does 
that he must put up with what he gets." 
From that on Mr. E. was lionized by 
those New England passengers. They 
seemed to be perfectly delighted over the 
fact that in a wordy battle " a little Penn- 



62 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



sylvania Dutchman " (as Mr. Early was 
wont to denominate himself) had so 
completely unhorsed the great Cardinal 
McCloskey, of New York. 

From Itinerant. I. L. Kephart. 



A Lesson from Pompeii. 

In the year 79 the city of Pompeii, 
standing in the fertile plain at the foot of 
Mount Vesuvius, was overwhelmed by an 
eruption of the volcano. For almost 
seventeen centuries the' ruins of the city 
lay buried under the mass of ashes and 
other volcanic matter; and during the 
Middle Ages even the fact that such a city 
had once existed was lost from human 
knowledge. In the year 1748 King 
Charles III., of Naples, began to make 
excavations in the site of the ancient city ; 
and his search was soon rewarded by the 
discovery of many interesting relics of the 
once busy life of the place. The re- 
searches have been continued since, and 
for a number of years past the excavations 
have been conducted under the direction 
of the Italian government. About one- 
half the city has been by this time ex- 
humed. Such relics as can be removed 
have been transferred to the great museum 
in Naples. The ruined walls of the build- 
ings are left standing, the lofty columns 
and extent of some of them suggesting 
the elegance of the city in the days of its 
prosperity. 

Among the most interesting of the re- 
mains found are those of human beings, 
in all manner of relations and attitudes. 
Jn some instances families were taking 
their meals when the suffocating and fiery 
flood overtook them. Some were making 
their toilets, others were taking their 
baths, some were engaged about various 
occupations, and some were in the streets 
in the attitude of flight, as if seeking to 
escape from the deluge of destruction. 
Every kind of production belonging to a 
busy city life has been unearthed, works 
of art of various kinds, statues, fountains, 
gods, coins, jewelry, clothing, pottery, 
loaves of bread in the bake-shops, vehi- 
cles, and so on. Dogs and other animals 
in flight have also been found. 

Large mural paintings also are among 
the discoveries. Some of the dwellings 
were homes of luxury, and their plastered 
walls were ornamented with these rich 
frescoes. The figures as sketched by the 
artist and colored by his brush, now, 



after a lapse of over eighteen centuries, 
still stand out in their original and striking 
effects. 

One of the valuable lessons that we may 
gather from the strange history of this 
ancient city of Pompeii is that neither 
earthquake nor volcanic eruption nor 
lapse of prolonged centuries can coni- 
pletety blot out the works of men's hands. 
Our Friend boys and girls are painting 
pictures now which twenty centuries 
hence, or twenty centuries a thousand 
times repeated, shall still stand forth in 
all their clearness of outline and meaning. 
In every day's words and acts, nay, in 
each day's secret thoughts and unspoken 
feelings, the brush is taken up and some 
form of outline or coloring applied. 

Again, every act of ours after it is per- 
formed passes to the record of eternity. 
We cannot change it ; it has passed out of 
our power. Time may seem to cover it 
up. It may not be recalled during our 
life-time. But some time in the future the 
rubbish of the ages will be removed, the 
judgment will be set, and men will be 
judged according to the deeds they have 
done. Then all the acts of our earthly 
life will stand forth with a distinctness 
and power that will be to the wicked 
utterly appalling. Murderers will see 
ghastly pictures of blood ; drunkards their 
beastly excesses ; gamblers their instru- 
ments of fraud ; rumsellers their victims; 
profane men will hear the echoes of their 
profanity ; the vile of their filthy conver- 
sation ; and every kind of wicked and de- 
based people will meet again the true 
transcript of their sinful lives on earth.— 
Selected. 



ROOFING. 

GUM-ELASTIC ROOFING FELT costs 
only $2.00 per ioo square feet. Makes a 
good roof for years and anyone can put it on. 

GUM-ELASTIC PAINT costs only 6o cents 
per gal. in bbl. lots, or $4.50 for 5-gal. tubs. 
Color dark red. Will stop leaks in tin or iron 
roofs that will last for years. TRY IT. 

Send stamp for samples and full particulars. 

GUM ELASTIC ROOFING CO. 
39 and 41 W. Broadway, New York. 
I.OCAI. AGENTS WANTED. 

$10 and $20, Genuine Confederate Bills 
lonly five cents each ; $50 and $100 bills 
10 cents each; 25c and 50c shinplasters W 
cents each ; $1 and $2 bills 25 cents each. Sent 
securely sealed on receipt of price. Address, 
Chas. D. Barker, 90 S. Forsyth St., At- 
lanta, Ga. 



$5 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



63 



CUMBERLAND VALLE Y KAILltOAD. 

TIME TABLE— Oct. 1, 1893. 



Doivx Trains. 


C'bg 
Acc. 


Ky'e 
Exp 


Mr'g 
Mail 


Day 
Exp 


Ev'g 
Mail 


No. 12 


No. 2 


No. 4 


No. 6 


No. 8 

P. M. 

2 30 

3 20 
410 

4 36 

5 00 
5 30 

5 51 

6 17 
6 43 


A. M. 


A. 11. 

6 15 
700 

7 40 

8 09 
8 30 

8 55 

9 15 
9 40 

10 04 


A. M. 


P. M. 


" Martinsburg 












8 30 


11 25 

11 48 

12 08 
12 30 
12 50 

115 
1 40 


'• Greencastle 




" C'hambersburg 

" Shippensburg 


6 10 
6 32 

6 53 

7 18 
7 i'l 


9 05 






" Mechanicsburg 


9 56 


" Harrisburg 


8 03 


10 25 


10 30 


200 


7 05 


" Philadelphia 


11 25 


125 


125 


650 


11 15 


" New York 


2 03 


4 03 


4 03 


9 38 


3 50 




11 15 


3 10 


3 10 


6 45 


10 40 




A. M. 


P. M. 


P. M. 


P. M. 


P. M. 



P. M. 

3 20 

4 50 
7 10 

7 36 

8;oo 

8 16 

8 53 

9 20 
9 43 

10 05 
A. M. 
4 30 
7 33 
6 20 

AM. 



Additional trains will leave Carlisle dailv except Sunday at 
5:55 a. m., 7:6S a. m., 3:40 p. m., stopping at all intermediate 
stations, arriving at Harrisburg at 6:40 a. m., 8:03 a. m., 4-30 
p. m. 

Evening Mail runs daily between Harrisburg and Cham 
bersburg. 



Up Trains 



Lv. Baltimore 

" New York .. .. 
" Philadelphia.. 



Harrisburg 

Dillsburg 

Mechanicsburg . 
Carlisle 



Greencastle., 
Hagerstown. 



Win 


Me's 


Hag 


Ev'g 


C'bg 


N. O. 


Acc. 


Exp 


Acc. 


Mail 


Acc. 


Exp- 


No. 1 


No. 3 


No. 5 No. 7 


No.17 


No. 9 


P. m. 


A. M. 


A. If. 


A. M. 


P. M. 


P. M. 


11 40 


4 45 


8 53 


11 20 


2 15 


4 23 


8 00 


12 15 




9 00 


200 


2 06 


11 20 


4 30 


8 50 


11 50 


2 20 


4 30 


A. M. 


A. M. 


P. M. 


P. M. 


P.M. 


P. M. 


4 40 


7 53 


12 40 


3 40 


5 20 


8 00 


5 03 


8 13 


1 03 


4 01 


5 41 


8 20 


5 30 


8 36 


1 29 


4 25 


605 


8 44 


5 55 


900 


1 52 


4 55 


6 36 


9 08 


6 15 


9 21 


213 


5 10 


6 57 


9 29 


6 40 


9 43 


2 35 


5 35 


7 20 


9 50 


7 02 


10 04 


3 01 


5 50 




10 12 


7 25 


10 27 


3 25 


6 18 




10 35 


9 30 


11 12 




7 02 






11 00 


12 00 




7 50 






A. M. 


A. M. 


P. M. 


P. M. 


P. M. 


A. M. 



Additional trains will leave Harrisburg daily except Sunday 
at 10:35 a. m.. 10:45 p. m., arriving at Carlisle at 11:20 a. m., 
11:30 p. m., stopping at all intermediate stations ; additional 
train will leave Hagerstown at 8:00 a. m„ arriving at 11:00 
a. m., stopping at all intermediate stations. 

Pullman Palace Sleeping Cars between Hagerstown and New 
York on Keystone Express and Night Express east, and on 
Memphis Express and New Orleans Express west. 

Pullman Sleeping Cars on Night Express and New Orleans 
Express between Philadelphia and New Orleans. 

TF you wish to advertise anything anywhere at any time, 
1 write to GEO. P. POWELL & Co., No. 10 Spruce Street, 
J»ewYork. 

EVERY one in need if information on the subject of ad- 
vertising will do well to obtain a copy of "Book for 
Advertisers. 3(i8 pages, price one dollar. Mailed, postage 
Paid, on receipt of price. Contains a careful compilation from 
we American Newspaper Directory of all the best papers 
*nd class journals: gives the circulation rating of every one, 
and a good deal of information about rates and other matters 
Pertaining to the business of advertising. Address HOW- 
ELL'S ADVERTISING BUREAU, 10 Spruce Street, New 
iork. 



"Everybody's Law Book," 

to the title of the new 768 page work now in press, 
Prepared by J. Alexander Koones, L L. B., member 
or the New York Bar. 

It enables every man and woman to be their own 
Jftwyer. It teaches what are your rights and how to 
maintain them. When to begin a law suit and when 
•° shun one. It contains the useful information 
«very business man needs in every State in the Un- 
it contains business forms of every vai-iety 
Jjsefui to the lawyer as well as to all who have legal 
°usiness to transact. 

Inclose two dollars for a copy, or inclose two-cent 
Postage stamp for a table of contents and terms to 
"gents. Address BENJ. W. HITCHCOCK, Pub- 
"Sner, 385 Sixth Avenue, New York. 



W. F. BECKER. 



J. P. BKUGGEK. 



-^J>* THE &-V~- 

Eastern Book Store, 

315 Market St., Harrisburg, Pa. 
BOOKS AND STATIONERY. 

Special Kates to Students. 

W~ Second-Hand School Books a Specialty. 

WRITE FOR PRICES. 



J 



L. SAYLOR & SONS, 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

CARRIAGES, 

LIGHT BUGGIES. PONY PHAETONS, ETC. 
STRICTLY FIRST CLASS. 

Shops Opposite Eagle Hotel, ANNVILLE, PA 



£ B. MARSHALL, M. D., 

No. 34 East Main Street, 

ANNVILLE, PA. 

ISAACMANN&SON, 

LARGEST CLOTHIERS, 

834 Cumberland Street, 

LEBANON, PA. 

THE BEST GOODS EOR THE LEAST MONEY. 



J 



R. McCAULY, 



DAILY MEAT MARKET. 

GOOD MEAT. LOW PRICES. AJSTNVILLE. PA. 

JOHN TRUMP, 

J BOOT AND SHOE MAKER, 

ANNVILLE, PA. 

WS. SEABOLD, 
. DEALER IN 

Drugs, Medicines, Perfumer; and Toilet Articles, 

No. 2 East Main St., Annville, Pa. 



J- 



S. KENDIG, 

BAKERY, 

Next Door to Eagle Hotel, Annville, Pa. 



J. KIEFER, M. D., 
HOMEOPATHIC PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON. 
76 West Main St., Annville, Pa. 



DEXTER LIVERY AND R0ARDING STARLE 
RAILROAD ST., ANNVILLE, PA. 

R. A. MAULFAIR, - PROP'R 

GOOD TEAMS AT SEASONABLE BATES. 



■* 



I I 



64 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



^yiLLIAM KIEBLER, 
SHAVING AND HAIR DRESSING, 

Eagle Hotel Barber Shop, Annville, Pa. 



ADAM B. HESS, 
OFFICE AT THE HOTEL EAGLE. 
OMNIBUS TO ALL TRAINS. 

ANNVILLE. PA. 

TACOB SARGENT, 

^ FASHIONABLE TAILOR, 

18 and 30 Main St., Annville, Pa. 

DRY GOODS, NOTIONS, GRO- 
CERIES, BOOTS and SHOES, 

—AND— 

GENTS' FURNISHING GOODS. 

J. St. SIIOPE, 

ANNVILLE, PA. 

AC. M. HEISTER, 
• STATIONERY JOB PRINTER, 

Visiting Cards a Specialty. 
35 S. White Oak Street - - Annville, Pa. 

WILLIAM WALTZ, 
FASHIONABLE 

HAIR CUTTING AND SHAVING SALOON, 

West Main Street, Annville, Pa. 
H. H. KBEIDER. JNO. E. HERB. 

KREIDER & CO., 
DEALERS IN ALL KINDS OF 

Hard & Soft Coal, Grain, Seeds Salt & Feed. 

Office : Railroad Street, near Depot, 
Telephone Connection. ANNVILLE, PA. 

THE BEST STOCK, THE LOWEST 
PRICES IN 

FURNITURE, jose^mTllers, 

ANNVILLE, PA. 



1VT. 



TEBS AND CREAM. 



SHAUD, 

DEALER IN 

Gold Watches and Jewelry, 

Wholesale and Retail Dealer in 
FINE CANDIES AND FRUITS. 

Families and Entertainments Supplied with OYS- 
ANNIZILLE, PA. 



S. M. SHENK'S BAKERY, 

HAS ALWAYS ON HAND 

FRESH BREAD, CAKES AND ROLLS, 

One Door West Penn'a House, Annville. 



S. D3. WAGNER, 

— ^-S- Headquarters i- or -V*— 
GROCERIES. CONFECTIONERIES 

OYSTERS, FRUITS AND NUTS. 
Restaurant Attached. Meals at All Hours. 

12 West Main Street, Annville, Pa. 



II yon want to Bay a Hat rignt, and a rignt Hat, or anything in 
Men's Furnishings, 

GO TO 

EIRE Sz CZR-A-lSriivGEIR, 
Successors to RAITT & Co., 

708 Cumberland Street, Lebanon, Pa. 

Kinports & Shenli 

ANNVILLE, PA., 

Dealers in Dry Goods, Notions 

and Ladies' Dress Goods. 

Men's Suitings we make a Specialty. Home-made, 
Ingrain and Brussels Carpets. You buy Cheaper 
from us than away from home, and have a large 
stock to select from. 

THE 

U.B. MUTUAL AID SOCIETY 

OF PENNSYLVANIA. 1 

HOME OFFICE, LEBANON, PENNA. 

Chartered by the State Legislature, March 11, 1869. 
Positive amounts guaranteed and claims paid in 
full. 

Benefits of $1000 insurance secured for $8.00. 
Reciprocal Circle Insurance,new and very popular. 

Invested Assets $146,809.94 

Contingent Assets 116,970.00 

Assessment Basis 5,295,000.00 

Death Losses Paid 6,774,123.01 

THE PLAN". 

The payment of EIGHT DOLLARS on application, 
FIVE DOLLARS annually for four years, and there- 
after TWO DOLLARS annually during life, with 
pro rata mortality assessments for each death of a 
member insured for $1000, is as follows: 



Age. 


Ass't 


Age. 


ASS'MT 


Age. 


Ass'mt 


Age. 


ASSM'T 


20 


65 


30 


75 


40 


90 


50 


1 30 


21 


66 


31 


77 


41 


92 


51 


1 40 


22 


67 


32 


79 


42 


94 


52 


1 59 


23 


68 


33 


81 


43 


96 


53 


1 6(* 


24 


69 


34 


83 


44 


98 


54 


1 70 


25 


70 


35 


85 


45 


1 00 


55 


1 80 


26 


71 ' 


36 


86 
87 


46 
47 


1 06 
1 12 


56 


1 92 


27 
28 


72 
73 


37 
38 


88 


48 


1 18 






29 


74 


39 


89 


49 


1 24 







This will entitle a member to a certificate of 
to be paid after death to the legal beneficiary, wnen- 
ever such death may occur. 

Reliable Agents Wanted Everywhere. 



CHOICE BEEF, LAMB, VEAL, PORK AND 
TONGUES at 

Maulfair's Daily Meat Market, 

ANNVILLE, PA. 



Volume VI. 



Number 9. 



THE 



College Forum. 



NOVEriBER, 1893. 



CONTENTS: 




^Editorials ...... 65, G6 

^Meeting of Trustees 66 

;Our College Agent 66 

By. fm. O. Fries, A. M 66 

&ight 66 

£Fhe Sabbath Day 67-70 

•The Demon of Nicotine 70 

jj|A Huge Pile of Confederate Money ... 70, 71 

^What is a Christian ? 71-73 

The Liberty Bell 73 

Musical Contest 73 



TAGB 

College Directory 74 

Kalozetean Literary Society 74 

Philokosmian Literary Society 74, 75 

Clionian Literary Society 75 

Our Alumni 75, 76 

Alumni Dinner 76 

Personals and Locals 76, 77 

Our Exchanges 77 

The Missionary Character of a College . 77, 78 
Advertisements 78-80 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE, 
ANNVILLE, PA. 




HARRY LIGHT, 

BOOKS AND STATIONERY, 

22 EAST MAIN ST., ANNVILLE, PA. 



o 

S5 

o 
X 
w 

Q 

55 

►J 

w 

CO 
S3 

PQ 
w 



Our shelves are constantly filled with 
New, Second-Hand and Shelf-Worn 



© 

t- 1 

© 

J > 

55 



Together with a Complete Assortment of 

STATIONERY, 

Wall Paper and Window Shades. 

A Selected Stock of the 

LATEST STYLES OF WALL PAPER 

AND 

DECORATIONS. 



as 
w 

w 
X 
HI 
i 

ttf 
O 

o 

CO 



SCHOOL AND COLLEGE TEXT BOOKS A SPECIALTY. 
C. SMITH, 

CIHTBA1 1001 if Oil, 

ANNVILLE, PA, 



HEADQUARTERS FOR 

COLLEGE AND SCHOOL SUPPLIES, 

INCLUDING 
NORMAL DEPARTMENT. 
OLD BOOKS. NEW BOOKS. 

Cheapest place in the Lebanon Valley to buy your 
Books. 4®=* New and Old Books Bought, 
Sold and Exchanged. 

WATCHES, CLOCKS AND JEWELRY, 

SILVER PLATEDWARE, 

Spectacles a Specialty. rittecl sV^ *Mc! n Gold ' 

PERFECT FOCUS AND FIT GUARANTEED. 

ISAAC WOLF, 

s 

ONE PRICE ONLY . 

SATISFACTION GUARANTEED. 
828 CTJIVlBERIl.AJSrD STREET. 



ON MARKET ST., AT THE RIVER BRIDGE, 

HARRISBURG, I? A.. 

CARPETS, OIL CLOTHS, ETC. 




Always sold at the Lowest Cash Prices. All Goods 
Guaranteed to be as represented. Rag and Ingrain 
Carpets 25 cents per yard up. Floor and Table Oil 
Cloths 25 cents per yard up. 

FRED. W. YINGST, on Market St., at the Bridge. 

BOOKS! BOOKS! BOOKS! 



When you need Books or Stationery of any kind 
correspond with or call on us. By so doing you will 
secure the Best Goods at the most Favorable Prices. 

Stock always New and Fresh. Assortment Large. 
Prices the Lowest. Whether you intend to buy '25c. 
or $25.00 worth, it will pay you to call to see us. 

Bagster's and Oxford Teachers' Bibles a Specialty. 
We carry in stock the publications of the U. B. 
Publishing House, such as Otterbein Hymnals, 
Hymns of the Sanctuary, the Books used in the 
three years' course of study, S. S. Music Books. 

AGENTS WANTED to sell the best and most 
popular Lord's Prayer published. Send 75 cents for 
sample copy, worth $2.00. Address plainly 

CRIDEB, & BROTHER, 

PUBLISHERS OF 



grapniviarriageierim 

Photograph Tamil; Records, Etc., Etc, 

YORK, PA. 



PLEASE MENTION « THE COLLEGE FORUM. 1 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 

Vol. VI. No. 9. ANNVILLE, PA., NOVEMBER, 1893. Whole No. 65. 



EDITORS. 

H. CLAY DEANEK, A. M., 
Editor-in-Chief and Publisher. 



ASSOCIATE EDITORS. 
John H. Maysilles, '95. D. S. Eshelman, '91. 

William H. Kreider, '91. 



SOCIETY EDITORS. 

Clionian Society— Miss Maggie Strickxer, '94. 
Philokosmian Society— Oscar E. Good, '94. 
Kalozetean Society— G. A. L. Kindt, '94. 

All communications or items of news should be sent to 
lie Editor in Chief. Subscriptions should he sent to the 
Publishing Agent. 

THE COLLEGE FORUM will be sent monthly for one 
ehool year on receipt of twenty-Are cents. Subscriptions 
eived at any time. 

For terms of advertising, address the Publisher. 



Entered at the Post Office at Annville, Pa., as 
"~~ond-class mail matter. 



Editorial. 



The week of praj^er for young people 
Df our colleges was observed. 



The second entertainment of the lecture 
course will be given on December 1. 



The anniversary of the Clionians 
romises " a feast of reason and a flow of 

Id." _ 

The lace curtains which have beautified 

ie Ladies' Hall are the gift of the ladies 

'the Hall. _ 

. — * • 1 

The Thanksgiving services will be held 

the new Lutheran Church. Sermon 

be preached by Rev. Spayd. 



lrs. M. 0. Lane, wife of Rev. Lane, 
ler agent of the College, died sud- 
! nly of heart failure, aged sixty years 
two months. Mrs. Lane had many 
lends in Annville, who deeply mourn 
death. The Forum sympathizes with 



the bereaved husband and children and 
prays that God's choicest blessing may 
comfort and keep them, till reunited in 
Heaven. 



The recent family reunion of our pas- 
tor, Rev. Spayd, was attended by their 
parents and nearly all of their brothers 
and sisters. 



President Bierman will attend the 
meeting of the College Association which 
meets at Columbia College, New York 
City, December 1st. 



Football is receiving quite an impetus. 
Daily the ball is sent across the campus 
by skilled athletes, who are making for 
themseves an enviable reputation. 



The meetings were very spiritual and 
well attended. Three have professed faith 
in Christ. Our next issue will give a 
more full account, as meetings are still in 
progress. 

The educational meeting of the presi- 
dents and educators of our colleges to be 
held at Johnstown, on the 28th inst., is 
looked forth to as of great significance. 
We as a church seem to be awake to every 
interest save the equipping of our colleges. 
Great questions are to be solved which 
will effect the church in her influence in 
the coming years. Despite the apathy 
and neglect of the church in well endow- 
ing her colleges, they have been powers 
for good and given her prestige. We 
rejoice that the day has come when the 
highest authority of the church makes a 
special call to consider the colleges' many 



66- 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



needs and desire plans for speed}' relief. 
Let the church praj- most fervently that 
wisdom may be given those who shall 
consider these vital interests of our Zion. 



Meeting of Trustees. 

The annual meeting of the Board of 
Trustees of the College is regularly held 
during Commencement week, and for 
many reasons this is about the best time 
for the transaction of its usual business, 
but there are times when new interests 
spring up which if properly directed at 
once will inure to the advantage of the 
enterprise under management, and which 
if neglected or postponed will involve loss 
in more than one way. 

The Executive Committee, believing 
that the auspicious time is at hand when 
the right action taken by the authorities 
of the College will very favorably tell for 
its future prosperity, have therefore 
authorized a call for a special session of 
the Board on the tenth day of January 
next. This call is accompanied with a 
cordial invitation to all friends of the 
College and education in general to meet 
with the Board for the purpose of dis- 
cussing the future interest of the institu- 
tion and devising plans to make it what it 
ought to be and readily m&y be made to 
be by proper support — namely, first 
among its equals in our State. 

Within the borders of the five patroniz- 
ing Conferences of the College there is 
wealth enough controlled by our people 
to fully equip and amply endow the insti- 
tution, and we have the confident hope 
that under proper direction that rrfny be 
done at an early daj\ We await the 
action of the coming meeting of the Board 
with no ordinary solicitude. 



Our College Agent. 

We are gratified to state that the Exe- 
cutive Committee of the College, at its 
recent session, October 27th, by a unani- 
mous vote elected the Rev. Martin J. 
Mumma General Agent of the College. 
Mr. Mumma is well known to nearly all 
the readers of the Forum, and therefore 
needs no introduction here. Suffice it to 
say that he is a Christian gentlemen of 
broad culture, excellent preaching ability, 
a fine conversationalist, an indomitable 
worker, and a man of winning manners. 



The College is to be congratulated in 
securing his services for this important 
position, and with a united and earnest 
support on the part of the friends of the 
cause of education, we predict for him 
eminent success. 



Rev. Win. 0. Fries, A. M. 

The friends in the East, and especially 
those in Lebanon Yalley College, were 
delighted when the welcome intelligence 
came last week that the gentleman whose 
name heads this article is appointed pastor 
of Westerville (Ohio) TJ. B. Church. 

This is the location of Otterbein Uni- 
versity and with this congregation worship 
the faculty and students of the institution. 
Mr. Fries is an alumnus of Lebanon Yal- 
ley, was graduated in the class of '82 and 
afterwards completed a theological course 
in Union Biblical Seminary. 

Since then he has been preaching and 
teaching in turn, and certainly no higher 
compliment could come to any young man 
than to be called to serve as college pastor 
in a town and congregation whose pulpit 
in former years was filled by men of emi- 
nence like Dr. Swain, Dr. Chapman and 
Bishop Mills. Lebanon Yalley takes pride 
and tenders congratulations to her son in 
his promotion. 



Night. 

Night, sable goddess, 
Spreads her gloom o'er all, 

Casting a deep shade, 
Like unto man's fall. 

Thy darkness hides sin ; 

Foul acts there do dwell ; 
Since light they will shun, 

Dark deeds to plan well. 

Calm, thou art lovely, 

Peacefully sleeping. 
The birds fold their wings, 

Safe in thy keeping. 

Nature calmly lies 

In thy darkness still ; 
Unbroken by naught 

But God's holy will. 

Thou emblem to all 

Of eternity, 
Dreadful and quiet 

Thy reality. 

Keep still thy silence; 

Let it ever be 
A warning always, 

To keep me from thee. 

N. C. S. '97. 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



07 



The Sabbath Day. 

BY REV. GEO. F. BIERMAJJ, PH. D. 

When man for his sins was driven from 
the Garden of Eden, God permitted him 
to carry with him two institutions estab- 
lished for his good before the fall. Which 
of these ordinances is the greatest mercy 
to the world, or which is the dearest to 
the heart of a good man or woman, I will 
not here undertake to argue. One of these 
is marriage, the other is the Sabbath day. 
If he is the enemy of virtue who would 
abolish the former, he certainly cannot be 
the friend of God who would set aside the 
latter. By restoring marriage as far as 
possible to its original purity in Eden, 
i. e., by confining it to pairs and render- 
ing it indissoluble, the Christian religion 
has incalculably advanced civilization, 
peace and all the domestic virtues. By 
restoring the Sabbath day as near as pos- 
sible to its purity in Eden, i. e., by the 
holy observance of all of it, man makes 
the nearest approach to primitive inno- 
cence and to future glory. There is cer- 
tainly no example of any community, 
large or small, ancient or modern, continu- 
ing virtuous or happy for any considera- 
ble time if they slighted either marriage 
or the Sabbath day. While the Sabbath 
day is contemporaneous with man in 
Paradise, God re-instituted it on Sinai's 
summit amidst the flashes of lightning 
and the rolling of thunder, and placed the 
command in the moral code, " Remember 
the Sabbath day to keep it holy." It is 
the only one in the Decalogue that is ex- 
pressed both positively and negativel}'. 
Infinite knowledge and wisdom have im- 
posed upon man the bounden duty of 
keeping this day sacred or suffer the fear- 
ful consequences of a displeased and 
angry God. We learn by experience that 
the condition of a people does not render 
it at all impracticable to keep the Sab- 
bath day. Indeed to the children of 
Israel on their long journey were wanting 
maivy conveniences which we now enjoy 
for its careful observance, and the law of 
the Sabbath can as well be kept now as at 
any former period. If it was practicable 
at any time, it certainly is so now. No 
good government will inflict a penalty 
upon the transgressor to whom obedience 
is impossible, even though the law re- 
mains on the statute books. 

Some laws expire by limitation. Such 
are some of the laws of our country, and 



such were some of the laws of Moses. 
The whole ceremonial law ceased after the 
death of Christ. Such was not the limit 
of the Sabbath, because Christ who was 
the fulfilling of the law set no limit for 
the observance of this commandment. 

A competent authority may repeal a law, 
and thus its obligation may cease. Every 
free government affords numerous in- 
stances. In every well regulated govern- 
ment the repeal must be made by the 
authority which enacts the law. The 
great Lawgiver of the world is God. He 
ordained the law of the Sabbath, and he 
has never repealed it. All admit that the 
law was in force till Christ. Nor did he, 
the Son of God, repeal it, but he came to 
interpret and fulfil it. When the Phari- 
sees were too exacting about his disciples 
he said, " The Sabbath was made for man, 
and not man for the Sabbath." Did 
Christ's most devoted followers keep the 
other commandments ? So did they keep 
this. A law that was enacted with as 
much care as the law of the Sabbath cer- 
tainty demands our utmost attention. It 
is introduced as no other. The very first 
word is a memento — " Remember." This 
word is found nowhere else in the Deca- 
logue. It moreover, also, addresses man 
in the singular, " Thou shalt," and even 
goes to particularize by saying who is 
meant, a particularity which is found in 
no other precept of the table. In this 
command God also reasons on the equity 
of his demands. " I am no hard master." 
I give you six days to do your necessary 
work, therefore if you have any conscience 
at all give me the seventh, it is mine — 
it is the Sabbath of the Lord your God. 
Above all, do not rob God by profaning 
the greatest blessing that he gives to man, 
the da}' of rest. Best of all, God has set 
for us the example by resting Himself on 
the Sabbath day, and hallowed it. 

But while the law of the Sabbath is en- 
acted with great care, it is also enacted 
often. It was first established in the 
Garden of Eden, re-enacted on Mount 
Sinai and indorsed b} r Jesus Christ. 
Pious men have always acknowledged it, 
both under the old dispensation and 
under the new. It is often noticed by 
Moses, by David, by Isaiah and Ezekiel, 
as well as by St. Luke and St. John. 
But some one has said, " Old things have 
passed away, and behold everything has 
become new." The Sabbath under the 
old dispensation was the seventh day in 



68 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



order, and now under the Christian dis- 
pensation it is the first. The change was 
made by the disciples. This change does 
not, however, ignore the idea nor the law. 
It still gives to God a seventh portion of 
time. It is positive, too, not one in six, 
one in ten, or one in twelve, but one in 
seven, and besides it commemorates the 
creation of the world and resurrection of 
Christ, as well as recognizes the Lord's 
day. God has also honored it by the out- 
pouring of his Holy Spirit on the Day of 
Pentecost. 

In keeping God's commandments there 
is great reward. The prophet Isaiah tells 
us that " If thou turn away thy foot on 
the Sabbath from doing thy pleasure on 
His holy clay and call the Sabbath a de- 
light, the holy of the Lord honorable; 
and shalt honor him, not doing thine own 
ways nor finding thine own pleasure, nor 
speaking thine own words, then shalt thou 
delight thyself in the Lord, and I will 
cause thee to ride on the high places of 
the earth and feed thee with the heritage 
of Jacob thy father, for the mouth of the 
Lord hath spoken it." 

While, therefore, the law is good if used 
lawfully and every blessing attends it, so 
the violation of it brings misery and pain 
and in the end eternal punishment, be- 
cause of the wrath of Him who made all 
things for good to them that love Him. 
But while the Christian Sabbath is " the 
day which the Lord hath made," we will 
be glad and rejoice in it. Let us there- 
fore see in what sense the law of the Sab- 
bath is still binding. In the Decalogue 
we learn that we are not to do any work, 
either mental or physical, on the Lord's 
day. Christ, who came to fulfil the law, 
best interprets this law by His own life 
and teachings when He said that "the 
Sabbath was made for man." - 

As " the Son of Man is Lord also of the 
Sabbath," he showed his disciples as well 
as the Pharisees that the law of the Sab- 
bath as recognized by the children of 
Israel was no more a formal code, but 
had become a spiritual principle. For 
" the letter killeth, but the spirit maketh 
alive." The Decalogue tells us what it 
forbids under a penalty of death. Christ 
teaches us what it permits under a dis- 
pensation of grace. The Saviour went 
himself with his disciples on a journey on 
the Sabbath day. He did not forbid 
them to pluck the ears of corn and eat. 
He healed the withered hand on the Sab- 



bath day. He also crossed the sea of 
Gennesarei in a boat after he had ordained 
his disciples on the mount, and comes into 
the country of the Gadarenes to drive out 
the legion of evil spirits and heal the sick. 

We learn from this that all labor except 
what is of necessity or mercy is forbidden. 
Although carnal man will abuse the doc- 
trine of necessity and mercy to defend 
his violations of the Sabbath day, yet 
"the law is good if used lawfully." 
Works of necessity as well as works of 
mercjr are both permanent or occasional. 
Works of necessity are permanent in pre- 
paration for the house of God, and occa- 
sional when unusual events take place, as 
in the case of fire, flood or tempest. 
Permanent works of mercy are such as 
the supply of food and drink for our- 
selves and families, guests and animals. 
But " whether we eat or drink, or what- 
ever we do, may we do it all to the honor 
and glory of God." 

There are three reasons why we ought 
to '•'•remember the Sabbath day to keep it 
holy:' 

We ought to be glad to keep the Sab- 
bath day for our own sakes, because " it 
brings great reward," and because blessed 
is the man that keepeth the Sabbath from 
polluting it." 

It is a remarkable experience of Judge 
Hale during forty years. He says that 
whatever he undertook in worldly busi- 
ness on the Sabbath clay that business 
never prospered. More than this. The 
more careful he was in attending properly 
and diligently to the duties and privileges 
of the Lord's clay, the more happy and 
successful he was during the following 
week. 

"A Sabbath well spent 
Brings a week of content, 
And a health for the toils of the morrow. 
But a Sabbath profaned, 
Whatsoe'er may be gained, 
Is a certain forerunner of sorrow." 

Of all the persons who were convicted of 
capital crimes under Judge Hale while 
on the bench, he found only a few who 
would not confess, on inquiry, that they 
began their career of wickedness by a ne- 
glect of the Sabbath. Let a man lay a 
foundation of no Sabbath, and he most 
certainly finishes with the top-stone of 
"no God." At a certain boarding house 
there were fifteen young men. Six of 
these were always present at the breakfast 
table on Sunday morning, washed, shaved 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



69 



and well dressed, and ready afterwards to 
go to church. They all prospered in 
business and were honorable citizens. 
The rest never appeared till near dinner 
time and their toilet poorly done, only 
ready to slip out at a convenient time to 
walk in the park, drive out into the coun- 
try or sail on the river. How different 
these from the other six. They always 
had a hard time to get along, led wicked 
lives, and either ended their lives on the 
gallows, in jail or in a drunkard's grave. 
Of six ladies who spent their Sundays in 
playing cards, five died either objects of 
pity or without a moment's warning. 
People despise God by visiting the open 
cigar store or candy shop, or theatres or 
picnic grounds on Sunday, and God takes 
away the restraints of providence. There 
ought, then, to be a keeping of the Sab- 
bath and a reverence for the church, be- 
cause as soon as man gives over caring 
for the Sabbath, so soon will he neglect 
his soul. Where will it end ? How shall 
we escape if we neglect this part of so 
great a salvation ? 

Then we should remember the Sabbath 
clay for the sake of our country. Nehe- 
miah in talking to the princes of Judah 
addressed them thus : " What evil thing 
is this that ye do to profane the Sabbath 
by : Did not } r our father thus, and did 
not our God bring all this evil upon us 
and upon this city ? Yet ye bring more 
wrath upon Israel by profaning the Sab- 
bath." Napoleon Bonaparte began the 
battle of Waterloo on the Sabbath, and 
the result was that he was defeated, his 
army destroyed, and the empire lost. 
■General Montgomerj- made the attack on 
Quebec, and his army was defeated and 
he was among the slain. The British 
began the battle of New Orleans on the 
Lord's day, and utter defeat attended 
them. God's blessing does not rest on a 
nation that breaks the Sabbath. The 
success of Messrs. Bynall in the town of 
Staffordshire, England, and the prosperity 
of the community was wholly due to the 
observance of the Sabbath day. Not a 
mill nor a furnace was in operation on a 
Sunday, no labor strikes to mar their 
happiness. It would undoubtedly be a 
wholesome lesson for a Homestead or 
any communit} 7 to take a look across the 
Atlantic. In the dark days of the French 
Revolution the divine Sabbath was tramp- 
led in the dust and a tenth day substi- 
tuted without divine saction, and so 



frightful did society become that even the 
infidel authorities had to reinstitute the 
divine Sabbath and public worship in 
order to save the metropolis and the 
country from utter desolation. France is 
still reaping the sad vintage of her folly, 
nor will she ever have a permanent repub- 
lic until she stops her roaring, roystering, 
rollicking Sabbaths and gives the Lord 
His day. Blackstone says : " The Sab- 
bath is of admirable service to the state 
considered merely as a civil institution." 
"A corruption of morals usually follows 
the profanation of the Sabbath." The 
state depends upon the home, and if the 
home is defiled by the violation of the 
laws of God, the state must necessarily be 
affected. From the Sabbath-loving home 
the state secures its best citizens. The 
might}' agency of the Sabbath day oper- 
ates in suppressing the criminal and 
pauper classes of the land, and secures 
the peace and safet}' of all citizens. If we 
look over the map of freedom, we see that 
those nations that keep the Sabbath day 
holy are most prosperous. The present 
financial crisis of '93 may serve as a lesson 
that while as a nation the United States 
ranks foremost on the globe, God desires 
nevertheless his Sabbath to be respected ; 
for, who knows but all may be the out- 
come of the violation of the Sabbath in 
opening the World's Fair at Chicago on 
Sunday in accordance with the decision 
of Judge Goggin that was made while 
under the influence of liquor. Though he 
made himself odious to the better class of 
people, yet "the just must suffer with the 
unjust." It not only brought shame to 
the bar, but to us as a nation. God still 
visits the iniquities of the people. 

Lastly, yet not in the least, should we 
remember the Sabbath day for the LoraVs 
sake. God rested on the first Sabbath 
after the Creation, thus setting us a most 
blessed example how to keep the Sabbath 
day by making it a holy day instead of -a 
holiday. If we keep His day sacred we 
please and honor Him, and thus gain His 
favor in a crown of everlasting life. God 
has often visited sore calamities on many 
violators of the holy Sabbath. From the 
days of the man who perished for his sins 
in the camp of Israel to the present day, 
God has made awful examples of Sab- 
bath-breakers. Men forsake God and He 
forsakes them. It is very evident to 
every Christian man and woman of this 
grand American Republic that we must 



10 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



rise up en masse to protect this God- 
given institution so dear to the heart of 
every child of God. People are drifting 
away into antinomian laxity. We, -as a 
nation, are in agitation more or less be- 
cause of the strenuous efforts made by 
"wicked men so greedy of gain as to over- 
throw the sacredness of the Sabbath by 
the enactment of laws to abolish the pres- 
ent statutes entirely or so to modify them 
as to permit many things which are vio- 
lations of that one supreme law. No 
legislative body or potentate has any 
right to use their God-given authority in 
an unreasonable manner and interfere 
with laws established by God. The bold 
assumption of unprincipled men are 
caused by the lust of money and pleas- 
ure, and wholesome laws are trampled 
under foot. There is to-day a strong 
tendency towards a so-called Continental 
Sabbath. Will we allow the foreign ele- 
ment to Europeanize America? Can we 
give up the American Sabbath bequeathed 
to us by our forefathers? De Tocque- 
ville, the celebrated French statesman, 
who was commissioned by his country 
to visit America for the purpose of study- 
ing the genius of our institutions, said 
before the Chamber of Deputies : " I went 
at your bidding and passed along their 
thoroughfares of trade. I ascended their 
mountains and went down their vallej^s. 
I visited their manufactories, their com- 
mercial markets and their emporiums fo 
trade. I entered their judicial courts and 
legislative halls, but I sought everywhere 
in vain for the secret of their success until 
I entered their Church. It was there as 
I listened to the soul-equalizing, soul-ele- 
vating principles of the gospel of Christ, 
as they fell from Sabbath to Sabbath 
upon the masses of the people that I 
learned why America was great and free, 
and why France was a slave." The end 
of the Sabbath would be for the United 
States the beginning of the reign of Mam- 
mon, Bacchus and Yenus, which would 
finally overwhelm us in temporal and 
eternal ruin. From such a fate may the 
God of Lexington and Gettysburg de- 
liver us. The Sabbath question is one of 
life and death in regard to Christianity. 
While the enemy of our religion tried the 
sword and fagot and could not destroy 
the gospel, the shades of perdition are 
trying to creep over this fair and happy 
land in another form. The last weapon 
that the enemy seeks to employ where- 



with to destroy Christianity is to "cor- 
rupt " the Sabbath day and make it a day 
of festivity and sensual pleasure. "Vol- 
taire, one of the greatest infidels the world 
ever had, said : " There is no hope of ever 
destroying Christianity so long as the 
Sabbath is kept as a sacred day." 

"Welcome sacred day of rest, 

Sweet repose from worldly care. 
Day above all days the best ; 

When our souls for heaven prepare. 
Day when our Redeemer rose 

Victor o'er hosts of hell. 
Thus he vanquished all our foes ; 

Let our lips his glory tell." 



The Demon of Nicotine. 

In an article recently published Capt. 
Charles King, the well-known writer, 
paints a vivid picture of the terrible effect 
of the tobacco vice upon men in active 
military life. Describing one of the cam- 
paigns against the Apaches he says : " I 
saw brave and war-worn men — soldiers 
who had fought all through the Rebellion 
and all over the plains and mountains of 
the West — pleading with tears in their 
eyes for a little tobacco. Extreme cold, 
or wet, or starvation they could bear with- 
out a murmer, but, deprived of tobacco, 
they .broke down utterly and ' wilted y 
like children." 

It would be scarcely possible to depict 
more forcibly the awful consequences 
which follow in the train of indulgence in 
the tobacco habit. It eats away the very 
essentials to manliness, saps a man's 
vitality and reduces him to a condition'of 
abject serfdom. If possible his condition 
is worse than that of slavery, for he is in 
bondage, not to a fellowman, but to a 
poison — a product of an inferior world, 
the vegetable kingdom. In a large meas- 
ure the insanit}^ prevailing in this country 
is to be attributed to the use of tobacco. 
Against the insidious approach of this 
monster, and the contamination of its 
poisonous breath, there is but one sure 
protection and that is complete abstinence 
from the use of tobacco in every form — 
Young Men's Era. 



A Huge Pile of Confederate Money. 

«8<»,000,000 of Bills Issued by the Departed Na- 
tion Shipped to Atlanta. 

Eighty million dollars in bills were 
shipped to Atlanta yesterday, the mam- 
moth packages of money filling five large 
dry goods boxes and making in all more 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



71 



than a dray load. None of the bills are 
current however, as they represent "noth- 
ing in God's earth now and naught in the 
waters below it. " They were Confederate 
bills of the rarest type. 

The huge pile of Genuine Confederate 
money was shipped here from Richmond, 
Va., the former capital of the Confederacy, 
and is now the property of Mr. Chas. D. 
Barker, No. 90 S. Forsyth Street, this city. 
The money is of every denomination issued 
by the departed nation, and in the big col- 
lection are bills of the rarest type. There 
are bills issued during every year of the 
war. Thousands of them are very valu- 
able as relics, but the great number of them 
Mr. Barker has on hand will make them so 
common as to bring but little on the mar- 
ket. 

This eighty millions of dollars of Con- 
federate money has been all along sup- 
posed to have been destroyed. This is 
undoubtedly the largest lot of Confederate 
money in the world. — Atlanta, Ga., Con- 
stitution, June Jfth. 



What is a Christian? 

Rev. W. H. Washinger, A. B., an- 
swers the above important question in his 
evening sermon Sunday, 12th inst. 

" And the disciples were called Chris- 
tians first in Antioch." Acts 11, 26. 
His theme — " What makes a Christian, or 
the characteristics of the Christian by the 
possession of which he is known." 

" Antioch was a large and important 
city, and one of the first places where the 
disciples established a church. It was 
one of the finest cities in the world; 
Situated about three hundred miles north 
of Jerusalem. Among the half million of 
inhabitants could be found the representa- 
tives of almost every nation on the globe. 
It was in this respect very much like New 
York city, and was founded B. C. 300 by 
Seleucus Nicator, and named after his 
father, Antiochus. It grew rapidly and 
soon became recognized as ' one of the 
three greatest cities in the civilized world.' 
It was almost an Oriental Rome. 

" The word ' Christian ' was not given 
or assumed by the disciples, but applied 
by the heathen as a term of derision. 
That powerful epithet has swept over all 
nations, thrilling millions of souls. 
Wherever the wilderness has been made 
glad and the desert has blossomed as the 
f ose, the name Christian has been and is 



heard. Shakespeare may say, ' What's in a 
name.' ' A rose by any other name would 
smell as sweet,' yet what other name 
could be substituted for the name Chris- 
tian ? Many names have been used show- 
ing their character such as faithful, saints, 
brethren, disciples, believers, but the name 
Christian is the noblest and best of all. 
It shows our master and leader and pat- 
tern, our Saviour and hope. The name 
Christian is no longer held in derision. 
Ask the mother and the father whose 
child lies in the slimy jaws of death, 
whether they are Christians. If not, they 
say: 'No, I am ashamed to say it, we 
ought to be. The same reply comes from 
all men in their sober moments.' 

" What makes a Christian ? The ques- 
tion is sometimes asked. What makes a 
Jew? What makes a Buddhist? What 
makes a Mohammedan ? A Jew would 
doubtless say that belief in God, which is 
not a dogma, but an intuition, whose at- 
tributes are unity, incorporeality, eternity 
and omnipotence, is the admamantine 
basis on which Judiasm rests. He might 
add to this the reality of Revelation as the 
giving of the law through Moses, and 
future reward and punishment for those 
who obey or trangress divine law. 

" It does not mean to have a rented pew, 
or simply to have your name recorded on 
the church record. A man may be able 
to draw a map of Palestine and yet not be 
a Christian. He may read the Bible 
through once each 3'ear and yet not be a 
child of grace. 

" To be a Christian means to do some- 
thing. To be a Christian means to be a 
Christ man, and consequently a Christ 
woman. To be a Christian then is to be a 
man in Christ. Paul in referring to his 
translation to the third Heaven says : " I 
know a man in Christ," 2d Cor. 12. 2. 

"The first step towards being a Christian 
is to believe on Jesus as did the Philipian 
jailer. 

" Second — True Repentance. The first 
great word that most men need is ' re- 
pent.' It implies a change of mind or a 
turning about and going the other way. 
We are naturally selfish, and we ought to 
be unselfish. We mainly consult our own 
pleasure when we should consult God's 
will. Repentance is not a matter of tears, 
but a changing of one's course of life ; it 
is in action as much as in feeling. Peni- 
tence is a bridge of golden chains that 
reaches from shore to shore and bridges 



72 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



the chasm which separates God from man 
and man from God. 

" Third — A new birth, not simply a 
reformation of life. The words of Christ 
to Nicodemus, ' Ye must be born again,' 
have been ringing through the ages. 
Morality will never expand into Chris- 
tianity any more than a pebble will expand 
into the oak. 

"Fourth — A thorough and complete 
change of character. This is the natural 
result of the regenerated man. He has 
a character, a Christian character, that 
will develop into wondrous beauty. The 
possession of such a character makes a 
man rich in this world and in the world 
to come. The question is sometimes 
asked. What is the source of character ? 
Where does it exist? Whence does it 
come ? We answer, character comes 
from the power of God in the soul. 
Every man is like the God he worships. 
Our God is holy. Heathen Gods are en- 
larged human beings with enlarged human 
vices, as is seen in the creations of Roman 
and Greek mythologies. A Christian 
character is the jewel that blazes on the 
brow of ro}^alty. 

"Sixth — To be a Christian is to have the 
spirit and mind of Christ. If any man 
have not the spirit of Christ, he is none 
of his, Rom. 8. 9. ' For as many as are 
led by the spirit of God, thev are the sons 
of God.' Rom. 8. 14. 

" Seventh — Christ's spirit was calm in 
death. He said : ' Father into thy hands 
I commend my spirit.' The secret of 
this tranquility was, ' Father, I have 
glorified thee on earth, I have finished 
the work Thou gavest me to do.' 

"In conclusion, are there any persons 
present to-night who desire to become 
Christians? I believe you all wish to be 
Christians. You mean to before you die. 
You want to go to the Christian's 
Heaven. Will you not believe on Jesus. 
Repent, be born again, receive a thorough 
and complete change of character, conse- 
crate yourself to God? Then you will 
have the Spirit of Christ, which was a 
spirit of compassion, an humble spirit, an, 
unselfish spirit, a spirit of holy zeal, of 
devotedness to God, a spirit of prayer, a 
calm spirit in the hour of death. 

"Begin to pray. Begin to praise God. 
Talk to men of salvation. Live like a 
Christian and you will die like a Christian. 

"If you would feel like a Christian, act 
like one, live like one. The way to be a 



Christian is not in forming resolutions 
and never fulfilling them. Many resolve 
and re-resolve, and do and die the same. 
Do as the scholar does, go to studying; 
as the traveler does, start on the journey; 
as the workmen does, take hold and work; 
as the farmer does, put in the spade and 
plough. 

" The way to be a Christian and remain 
a Christian is to let alone the thing. that 
is wrong, and take hold of the thing that 
is right. 

" Let the sun of righteousness shine on 
the willing soul, and ere long it blossom 
with Christian graces. Let the pierced 
hand of Calvary touch you, and out of the 
ashes of a burnt spiritual nature will flash 
the flame of a love to God more pleasing 
in His sight than all the songs of the re- 
deemed hosts in Heaven. For I read in 
my Bible, ' I saj^ unto }~ou, that likewise 
joy shall be in Heaven over one sinner that 
repenteth, more than over ninety and nine 
just persons, which need no repentance.' 
Luke, 15:7. You ought to be a Christian 
not so much to be saved from hell in the 
next world as to save you from sin and 
meanness in this. What people need to- 
day is not some charm, or theory, or pass- 
word that takes away the fear of hell, but 
a plain, practical gospel preached to them 
and an acceptance of Jesus Christ as a 
personal Saviour which makes them Christ 
men and Christ women. Not how to die, 
do most people need to know, but how to 
live. The burden of him who went up 
and down the earth with gentle face and 
gentle hands, inviting men and women to 
come unto him and be saved was to teach 
men how to live, not how to die. 

" If a man lives in Christ, walks in Him, 
as he receives him, he finds death capable 
of taking care of itself, and that he need 
not trouble himself about it. He will not 
worry about the 'Annihilation Theory,' 
'Soul Sleeping,' and many of the theories 
advanced which are unscriptural, unphilo- 
sophical, and contrary to common sense, 
and that something in man which tells 
him he is to live forever — even after the 
last bright star is stricken out of the 
Spangled Curtain of Night— forever at 
once either with God and angels and the 
blood-washed throng in the church tri- 
umphant or with the devil and his agents 
in the world of lost spirits. You do not 
need an insurance policy against fire m 
the next world, but an insurance policy 
certifying that you have in your posses- 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



73 



sion eternal life. That insurance and 
blessed assurance which Paul had when 
he said, 'I am crucified with Christ; 
nevertheless, I live ; yet not I, but Christ 
liveth in me ; and the life which I now 
live in the flesh, I live by the faith of the 
Son of God, who loved me and gave him- 
self for me.' Gal. 2:20. 

" Two gentlemen occupied a section in a 
palace car. A friend, waiting to bid one 
of them good-bye, asked : ' Have you an 
insurance ticket?' 'Oh, yes,' was the 
reply, ' I am insured.' When the friend 
had gone the traveling companion asked : 
' Are you insured forever V The gentle- 
man looked up in surprise, not at all un- 
derstanding: 'No, I only insure for a 
year at a time.' ' But I,' said the stranger, 
'am insured forever.' Still misunder- 
standing, the gentleman replied : ' Oh, 
yes, I know you can do it by one pay- 
ment, but it costs a great deal.' ' Yes,' 
was the reply, ' mine was done by one 
payment, and cost a great deal. It cost 
me nothing but it cost God His Son. It 
pays to be a Christian. It pays to be in- 
sured in the King's insurance company. It 
is the oldest in the world. Its policies 
never expire. It has never changed its 
management. It insures a man for more 
than he is worth. All those who have 
souls may apply.' 

" To be a Christian is to receive all 
kinds of benefits. The religion of the Lord 
and Savior Jesus Christ pays all sorts of 
benefits. Sick benefits and benefits to self 
after death, over yonder. Will you be 
numbered among Christians to-night." — 
Call, Harrisburg. 



The liberty Bell. 

On the afternoon of November 3d 
about four hundred scholars of the public 
schools of Annville, the Faculty and stu- 
dents of the College, and several hundred 
I citizens greeted the Liberty Bell as it 
passed en route to Philadelphia. The de- 
pot was beautifully decorated with flags. 
One especially attracted attention as giv- 
' ing evidence of having been in the late 
I Civil War. 

As the train neared the station it 
j slacked up, and all were permitted to see 
that bell which proclaimed liberty through- 
out all the land, unto all the inhabitants 
thereof. 

This bell, known as "the Liberty Bell," 
has a history that becomes of greater in- 



terest as the years roll on. It was 
brought originally from London in 1T52. 
In testing its sound, when hung, it was 
cracked. It was recast in Philadelphia 
hy Pass & Stow, from the old material. 
After three castings, the bell was consid- 
dered satisfactory and put in its place in 
in July, 1*753. The motto was selected 
by Isaac Norris, Chairman of the As- 
sembly. In 1778 the bell was removed 
to Allentown, Pa., so that it might not 
fall into the hands of the British, who 
were about to occupy the city. On the 
Evacuation of the city by the British, the 
bell was brought back and replaced in its 
old position. During the public reading 
of the Declaration, which took place in 
the State House yard on the 8th of July, 
1776, it probably rang. John Adams 
speaks of it, that "" The bell rang all day 
and almost all night." The years its 
tones were only prophetic were long and 
trying. It rang not actual freedom, but 
the hope of freedom. 

For about half a century it celebrated 
every National anniveasan\ While be- 
ing tolled in memory of Chief Justice 
Marshall, whose remains were being car- 
ried on July 8, 1835, to the wharf, to be 
sent to Virginia, a large crack was devel- 
oped. This break was only at first eight 
or ten inches in length, but when rung on 
February 22, 1843, it was so increased 
that ever afterward it could not be heard 
at a distance of more than a few feet. It 
has performed its mission and has be- 
come a silent memento of the great past. 



Musical Contest. 

We have received from the publishers, 
the two great rival inarches : 

" Protective Tariff Grand March," 
and 

" Free Trade Grand March." 

The former is by the well known 
author, Will L. Thompson, of East Liver- 
pool, Ohio. The latter is by Wm. Lam- 
artine, an author of equal talant, and 
both pieces are beautiful, bright and 
showy marches of medium difficulty for 
the piano or organ. Price 40 cents each. 

They are for sale at all music stores, or 
may be procured from Mr. Thompson at 
one-half price. One firm alone has 
ordered 15,000 copies. 



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THE COLLEGE FORUM. 




College Directory. 
Faculty. 

E. BEN J. BIERMAN, A. M., Ph. D., 

PRESIDENT, 

Professor of Mental and Moral Science. 
H. CLAY DEANER, A. M., 
Professor of the Latin Language. 

JOHN E. LEHMAN, A. M., 
Professor of Mathematics. 
Rev. JNO. A. McDERMAD, A. M., 
Professor of the Greek Language. 
JOHN A. SHOTT, Ph. B., 
Professor of Natural Science. 

MARY E. SLEICHTER, A. B., 
Professor of English Literature. 

CARRIE M. FLINT, 
Professor of Instrumental Music. , 
GERTRUDE ALBERTSON. 
Professor of Harmony and Fine Art. 
HARVEY D. MILLER, B. S., 
Teacher of the Violin. 

Literary Soeieties. 

CLIOMAN. 
Miss ANNA E. WILSON, President. 
Miss ELLA PENNYPACKER, Secretary. 

KALOZETEAN. 
SHERIDAN GARMAN, President. 
GEO. A. L. KINDT, Secretary. 

PHILOKOSMIAN. 
D. S. ESHLEMAN, President. 
GEO. H. STEIN, Secretary. 
Y. M. C. A. 
GEO. K. HARTMAN, President. 
HARRY W. MAYER, Secretary. 

T. W. 0. A. 
Miss MAGGIE STRICKLER, President. 
Miss ESTELLA STEHMAN, Secretary. 



Kalozetean Literary Society. 

Palma non sine pulvere. 



Our Society work this month has been 
seriously interrupted by lectures, etc., but 
we have been amply repaid by the good 
things we have heard. 

An election of officers was held which 
resulted in : President, S. Garman ; record- 
ing secretary, G. A. L. Kindt; corres- 
ponding secretary, H. W. Mayer. We 
take pleasure in announcing these names, 
and hope that the Society's best interests 
will be greatly advanced. 



Owing to the fine weather, the gymna- 
sium will not be opened this term, but 
next term it will be opened and classes 
started in different kinds of drill. 

Rev. IT. S. G. Renn, pastor of the 
TJ. B. church at Oberlin, Pa., was with us 
several weeks ago. The gentleman gave 
us a glowing address, in which was em- 
bodied much good advice. Our brother 
expresses himself as in every way satisfied 
with his calling, and we pray he may be 
richly rewarded for his labors. 

Rev. J. T. Spangler, '90, now a member 
of the Senior class at the TJ. B. Seminary,. 
Dayton, 0., called on us. He was on his 
way to New Haven, Conn., to attend a 
convention of theological students of 
which he was a delegate. We were very 
sorry the gentleman could not be with us 
at a regular meeting, but he could give us 
much encouragement anyhow. 

These visits show that we are not yet 
forgotten by our former members. 



Philokosmian Literary Society. 

Esse Quam Videri. 



If in any organization the order of ex- 
ercises is allowed to become monotonous, 
a decline in activity is a necessary conse- 
quence. The Philo boys, recognizing 
this fact, resolved to devote the evening 
of October 20 to exercises in the way of 
parliamentary drill. In these exercises 
the ludicrous was not entirely forgotten, 
and a very pleasant evening was spent. 
Among the propositions brought before 
the body was one with reference to the 
advisability of building an elevated steam 
railway connecting the ladies' and gentle- 
men's buildings. 

The bill was, however, after consider- 
able discussion, suffered to drop. 

The conjoint session of the Clionian 
and Philokosmiam Literary Societies, held 
on the 27th ult., was by all present de- 
clared to be one of the best and one of 
the most highly enjoyable ever held by 
these societies. There seems to be a gen- 
eral wish that they would come oftener. 
Cyrus Flook, an ex-member and editor of 
the Frederick County Guide, and Prof. 
Shott were with us on this occasion, and 
gave us interesting addresses. 

The evenings for our regular meetings 
have been taken up by other exercises for 
the last few weeks, and likely will be for 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



75 



several weeks to come. This state of 
things has a tendency to disorganize us 
somewhat, but we propose entering upon 
our work with increased zeal when these 
interferences are past. 

Among our friends who have visited us 
during the past month are the following : 
Misses Albertson, Flint, Richards, Kline- 
dinst, Walters, Loose, Gingrich, "Wilson 
and Strickler, and Messrs. Erb and Um- 
berger. 

Gr. K. Hartman left Annville on the 4th 
inst. for his home, where he spent several 
days. 

D. S. Eshleman spent several days at 
Royersford visiting Prof. Bowman. 

The Society will hold a book reception 
December 8th. An interesting program 
has been provided, and all our friends are 
invited to be present. 



Clionian Literary Society. 



Virtute et Fide. 
Society work during this term has been 
pursued by a zest characteristic of the 
Clionians. Weekly meetings have been 
d and interesting programmes ren- 
ered. At present preparations for the 
nniversary on Thanksgiving evening are 
hflming the attention of the Clios. We 
would ask the presence of as many ex- 
members and friends as possible, and thus 
show us that you are still interested in the 
C. L. S. 

A joint session of P. L. S. and C. L. S. 
was held October 27, 1893. This session 
was considered the most successful yet 
held by the two societies. After all had 
assembled the meeting was organized 
with Miss Mabel Saylor as President; 
Mr. W. H. Kreider, Secretary ; Miss 
Sleichter, Critic; Miss Albertson, Chap- 
lain; Miss Bowman, Pianist. The follow- 
ing interesting programme was then ren- 
dered : 

Instrumental Duet— . , 

Misses Pennypacker and Stehman. 
Address— Reminiscences of my Summer Vacation, 

S. F. Huber. 

Vocal Solo— Miss Wilson 

Essay— The most Striking Tiling at the World's Fair, 

Miss Flint. 

^citation— Miss Albertson. 

fostruinental Solo— Miss Fortenbaugh. 

Autobiography— Miss Bowman. 

•ocal Solo— O. S. Eshleman. 

Debate— Resolved, That woman in her present 
sphere has a greater influence than if she were 
granted the right ot suffrage, 

Affirmative, Miss Black, Mr. Stem. 
Negative, Miss Stehman, Mr. Albert. 
.Living Branch"— ....O. E. Good, Maggie Strickler. 
•ocal Quartette— . _ . 

Misses Black and Pennypacker, Messrs Good 
and Beattie. 



We were glad to have with us at joint 
session, Prof. Shott and Rev. Flook. 

Miss Fortenbaugh, of York, was agree- 
ably surprised by a visit from her cousin. 
Prof. Prowell, of Hanover, and her aunt, 
Mrs. H. S. Miller, and son, of York. 

Miss Ida Bowman, a former member, 
has returned to school to complete the 
musical course. She is a very active 
worker in the society. 

Miss Wilson, '94, and Miss Forten- 
baugh are contemplating a novel trip next 
week. An account of it will appear in 
the next issue of the Forum. 

Misses Kreider, Shenk, Brightbill, Ging- 
rich and Keller paid the society a pleas- 
ant visit in the beginning of the term. 
We are alwaj^s glad to have our friends 
and ex-members drop in to see us, and 
would cordially invite them to come again. 

Miss Grace Light, of Lebanon, and Miss 
Carrie Weiss, Harrisburg, called at the 
Ladies' Hall. 



Our Alumni. 



'90, The Rev. J. T. Spangler, student 
in the Union Biblical Seminary at Day- 
ton, Ohio, was one of the delegates to the 
American Inter-Seminary Alliance Con- 
vention, recently held at New Haven, 
Conn. He read by previous appointment 
a paper on " St. Paul as a Missionary," 
and the reporter compliments him by say- 
ing that " he had a grand man to talk 
about, and proved himself equal to the 
task." 

'91, The Rev. S. C. Enck recently met 
with a serious accident. While he was 
cutting wood in his yard at Manheim, 
Pa., where he is pastor of our church, the 
hatchet he was using slipped from his 
hand and struck his right leg, cutting a 
gash two inches deep and nearly three 
inches long. 

'80, Superintendent S. 0. Goho, of Mil- 
ton, this State, is one of the leading lec- 
turers at the Lebanon County Teachers' 
Institute this year. 

'87, The Rev. H. T. Denlinger, until re- 
centty a member of the Allegheny Con- 
ference, united with the East Pennsylva- 
nia at its late session at Steelton, and was 
appointed pastor of the Penbrook charge, 
East Harrisburg. 

'90, E. 0. Burtner, B. S., is attending 
the TJ. B. Seminary. 

'91, Samuel J. Evers, A. B., has entered 
the theological department of Yale. 



76 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



'88, Miss Sallie A. Mark, of Cambridge- 
port, Mass., recently paid a pleasant visit 
to the College. 

'80, S. P. Light, A. M., of Lebanon, Pa., 
•was recently elected Vice-President of the 
Lebanon and Annville Electric Railroad. 



Alumni Dinner. 

The committee appointed by the Al- 
umni Association to make the necessary 
arrangements for a grand rally and ban- 
quet of alumni and friends of the Col- 
lege have about completed the arrange- 
ments. The meeting will be held at the 
Commonwealth Hotel, Harrisburg, Pa., 
on the 28th day of December next, at 
8 o'clock p. m. It is desired that there 
be a large representation of alumni and 
friends. Notices have been sent to every 
member of the alumni, and if an}^ one fails 
to receive word it will be no fault of the 
committee. A failure to receive notice 
should hinder none from attending, as all 
are most cordially invited. Two dollars 
will entitle one to all the privileges. 

The following is the programme : 

TOASTS. 

*' Our Alma Mater,". . Prof. A. H. Gerberich, B. S., '88. 
" The Sunny Side of College Life," 

Ex-President C. J. Kephart, A. M. 
" The Alumni of L: V. C," 

Simon P. Light, A. M., '80. 

«' The Board of Trustees," 

Bishop E. B. Kephart, D. D., LL.D. 

IMPROMPTU ADDRESSES. 
MENU. 

Blue Points on Half Shell. 

Celery Mayonnaise. 
Potage. 
Green Turtle. 
Filet de Boeuf with Mushrooms. 
Potatoes Parisienne. 
Quail on Toast. Saratoga Chips. 

Cranberry Jelly. 
Dessert. 

Strawberry Ice Cream. Assorted Cakes. 

Roquefort Cheese. French Coffee. 
Fruit. 
Cigars. 



Personals and Locals. 

Rev. E. J. Meese, pastor of the U. B. 
church of this place, was joined in the hoty 
bonds of matrimony Thursday last to Miss 
Catherine Crosb}% of Massachusetts. The 
•ceremony was performed by Rev. James 
Chadwick, D. D., at the residence of the 
bride's sister, in Brooklyn, N. Y. Rev. 
Meese has made many warm friends dur- 



ing his short residence in this community, 
and they all join us in wishing him a happy 

and prosperous voyage through life . 

Boonsboro, 3fd., Times. 

Mrs. Bierman, spent a week at Philadel- 
phia during the first of the month visiting 
friends. 

The Missionary Band of the church gave 
a unique entertainment in the college 
chapel on the evening of the 10th inst., 
consisting of music, recitations and tab- 
leaux. 

During Hallow E'en some of the little 
boys (?) of the college got lost and did 
not materialize till next morning. Their 
faces became radiant when they realized 
that they were home again. 

W. H. Kreider, '94, attended the Lech- 
leider-Houck wedding at Harmony Grove, 
Md., on the 8th. 

The late Dr. Cyrus A. Loose, of Pea- 
body, Kansas, who was interred at Myers- 
town, Pa., on the 9th, inst., was a student 
of the college during 1861-68, and was one 
of the founders of the Philokosmian Lit- 
erary Society. 

Prof. Lehman was re-elected president 
of the Conferance Y. P. C. U. at its recent 
session at Mountville, Pa. 

John R. Wallace, '95, spent the 12th 
inst. in Harrisburg, visiting his cousin. 

The Prohibition Club have elected 
their orators for the oratorical contest, to 
be held January — , 1894. They are as 
follows : 0. E. Good, '94, D. S. Eshleman, 
'94, G. K. Hartman, '94, S. F, Huber, '94, 
J. H. Maysilles, '95, and J. R. Wallace, '95. 

The Tennis Tournament which was to 
be held on October 25 was not held, ow- 
ing to the inclemency of the weather. 

The Junior Rhetorical will be held De- 
cember 9. It was deferred on account of 
the Week of Prayer. 

The pianos have been repaired by 
Messrs. Farr and Burton, of Reading, Pa. 
The Department of Music rejoices, and 
promises the public some very extra 
music in the near future. 

The concert given in the College chapel, 
November 3d, by the Amphion Ladies 
quartte, of New York, was very much ap- 
preciated by the large audience present. 

Mrs. E. B. Bierman on her return home 
recently from Philadelphia, where she had 
been visiting for a fortnight, had a very 
pleasant surprise awaiting her. Durni» 
her absence the President added a Chick" 
ering piano to their pleasant home on the 
Avenue. 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



7T 



Profs. Lehman and Deaner addressed 
the Teachers' Institute at Lebanon during 
its recent session. 

M — Translating Livy — " ita pie hel- 
ium indici posse." Thus the pie was able 
to declare war. 

Prof. — What is the cause of Mr. W.'s 
illness ? 

G. — He (e) fell down in the field (ager) 
and it made him sick (aeger). 

Every man I meet is my master in some 
point, and in that I learn of him. — Emer- 
son. 

Miss Carrie Wise, of Harrisburg, and 
I Miss Grace Light, were the guests of Miss 
Strickler, '94, on the 6th inst. 

Prof. J. E. Lehman and Miss Estella 
Stehman, '96, were delegates to the Y. P. 
C. II. Convention, held at Mountville, Pa., 
November 7th and 8th. 

Messrs. S. F. Huber, '94, and Harvey 
Runkle, spent Sunday the 5th in Leba- 
non. 

Mr. G. K. Hartman, '94, spent the 5th 
and 6th at his home in Shiremanstown, 
Pa. 

Mr. H. D. Erb spent Sunday, the 5th 
inst., at his home, Manheim, Pa. 

Mr. Oscar Thompson, of Philadelphia, 
on the 4th and 5th inst. visited Miss Al- 
berts on. 

Misses Flint and Sleichter were dele- 
gates to the Y. W. C. A. convention at 
Lancaster, 3d to 5th inst. 

P. S. Eshleman, '94, visited friends at 
Royersford, Pa., on the 5th inst. 

Mrs. A. M. Garber, of Salunga, Pa., 
j paid a pleasant visit to her son on the 
' 4th inst. 

N. C. Schlichter, '97, spent Sunday, 
19th, at Harrisburg, enjoying the hospi- 
tality of Mr. A. H. Baldwin, 120 Broad 
street. 

A good suggestion. By its observance 
| you will be wise : 

"When you've got a thing to say, 
Say it ! Don't take half a day 
When your tale's got little in it, 
Crowd the whole thing in a minute ! 
Life is short— a fleeting vapor — 
Don't you fill the whole blank paper 
With a tale, which, at a pinch, 
Could he cornered in an inch ! 
Boil her down until she simmers ; 
Polish her until she glimmers. 
When you've got a thing to say, 
Say it! Don't take half a day !" 

F. D. Fagg in Young Men's Era. 

Last words of John Brown, Charleston, 
est Virginia, December, 1852: 



"I, John Brown, am now quite certain 
that the crimes of this guilty land will 
never be purged away, but with blood. 
I had, as I now think, vainly flattered 
myself that without very much bloodshed 
it might be done." 



Our Exchanges. 

We were beginning to think that the 
stringency of the money market had a 
very depressing influence on some of our 
former exchanges. However, our fears 
were not realized, and we are pleased to 
see them again on our list of welcome 
exchanges. 

The Students' Ten is the well edited 
monthly of California College. 

The October number of The Ursinus 
College Bulletin contains a full account of 
the exercises during the installation of 
Rev. Henry T. Spangler, A. M., as presi- 
dent of the college. 

The public schools of this country have 
369,000 teachers and 13,000,000 pupils. 

A beard becometh the college man as a 
snow-storm the Fourth of July. 

The Living-Stone mourns the death of 
Rev. James C. Price, D. D., President of 
Livingstone College. He was one of the 
most eminent orators and scholars of the 
colored race. 



The Missionary Character of a College. 

[From President Blerman's recent report to the 
East Pennsylvania Conference.] 
Here I might stop, as I believe I have 
given you the required information, but 
allow me now to add, by way of general 
remarks, that the true work of a college 
is largely of a missionary character — to 
make men and women better; to elevate 
human society 1 intellectually and spiritu- 
ally ; so to educate in the arts and sciences 
that when the graduate comes to enter 
upon the practical duties of life, he may 
have all the advantages of a deep, broad, 
and liberal culture ; to discipline all of 
man's powers in due proportion, and, 
above all, to give that religious culture 
and Christian training which form the 
very fonndation of all true and noble 
character. 

It is generally admitted by those who 
have given this subject thoughtful atten- 
tion, that a college which is to accomplish 
this kind of work must be under the 
auspices and immediate direction of some 
branch of the Christian church, in and 



*18 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 




by which it will exert a positive religious 
influence over its students and the com- 
munity which it is intended to reach. 

Let me quote the opinions of some men 
of note : 

William Penn, the pious founder of our 
State, in a preface to a work entitled 
u Frame of Government," remarks, " That 
which makes a good constitution must 
keep it, nameW, wisdom and virtue — 
qualities which, because they descend not 
with worldly inheritance, must be care- 
fully propagated by a virtuous education." 
Within twenty years after the landing of 
the Pilgrim Fathers, the corner-stone of 
Harvard College was laid with psalm and 
prayer by those who " dreaded to leave an 
illiterate ministry to the churches when 
their ministers should lie in the dust." 
Clergymen and laymen vied with each 
other in Christian liberality, and when 
the Rev. John Harvard gave his four 
thousand dollars, he secured for himself 
what is to-day the most conspicuous 
monument on the Western continent. 

" We give these books for the founding 
of a college in this colony," were the 
words of ten ministers, Who, in the year 
1T00, assembled in a village near New 
Haven, Connecticut, while each of these 
worthy pioneers deposited a few books on 
a table around which they were sitting. 
Such was the founding of Yale College. 

Cotton Mather once declared that the 
best thought which New England ever 
had was the Christian college. 

Princeton owes its origin to the same 
profound conviction that an able, wise 
and orthodox ministry could be provided 
for the churches only through the Chris- 
tian college. 

Williams was given by the churches for 
the churches, and no other motive could 
have planted it among the bleak hills of 
Northern Massachusetts. 

A " charity fund " was the corner-stone 
of Amherst. Said a speaker on the day 
of its dedication : " This is an institution, 
in some respects, like no other that ever 
rose. It has been founded and must rise 
by charity. And any man who shall 
bring a beam or a rock, who shall lay a 
stone or drive a nail, from the love of God 
and the kingdom of Christ on earth, shall 
not fail of his reward." 

This same spirit of Christianity, let me 
say, in due time laid the foundations of a 
Dickinson, and a Lafayette, and a Frank- 
lin and Marshall, and a Bucknell, and a 



Pennsylvania, and' our own Lebanon 
Valley. Now, let me ask, what have these 
institutions given the Church and the 
State in return ? I answer, Men ; men in 
the best sense of the word ; men of pro- 
found learning for the bench and the bar ; 
men skilled in statecraft for our public 
offices ; men of varied and extensive 
knowledge for the medical field, and men 
devotedly pious and thoroughly orthodox 
for our pulpits. Blot out these divinely 
established institutions, and where shall 
God's people look for the defenders of the 
Cross in the fierce intellectual contests of 
the future ? 

Lebanon Valley College was founded 
that it might " promote sound learning 
and deep piety in its students," and dur- 
ing the twenty-six years of its existence 
it has largely fulfilled this design. And 
though it has fallen far short of what its 
sanguine founders hoped for, particularly 
in the way of financial support and the 
number of students in attendance, it has 
grown stronger year by year and taken 
deeper root in the affections of the people, 
every member of the conference, every 
graduate and student of the College, every 
friend of the institution, every member of 
the United Brethren Church, should now 
seriously ask himself the question, What 
can I do to make this work a success? 
How may I be instrumental in the hands 
of God to promote this interest ? Stolid 
indifference is no less an obstruction than 
unkind opposition. 

May God speed the day when the entire 
membership of our Church in the East 
shall awake to its ability and responsi- 
bility in this all important interest. 

ROOFING. 

GUM-ELASTIC ROOFING FELT costs 
only $2.00 per 100 square feet. Makes a 
good roof for years and anyone can put it on. 

GUM-ELASTIC PAINT costs only 60 cents 
per gal. in bbl. lots, or $4.50 for 5-gal. tubs. 
Color dark red. Will stop leaks in tin or iron 
roofs that will last for years. TRY IT. 

Send stamp for samples and full particulars. 

GUM ELASTIC ROOFING CO. 
39 and 4-1 W. Broadway, New York. 
LOCAL AGENTS WANTED. 

C $10 and $20, Genuine Confederate Bills 
♦P^jonly five cents each; $50 and $100 bills 
10 cents each ; 25c and 50c shinplasters 1" 
cents each ; $1 and $2 bills 25 cents each. Sent 
securely sealed on receipt of price. Address, 
Chas. D. Bakkeb, 90 S. Forsyth St., At- 
lanta, Ga. 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



79 



CUMBERLAND VALLEY" KAILKOAD. 

TIME TABLE— Oct. 1, 1893. 



Down Tbains. 



Lv. Winchester 

" Martinsburg . ... 

1 Hagerstown 

" Greencastle 

" Chambersburg ., 

" Shippensburg 

" Newville 

" Carlisle 

" Mechanicsburg.. 
Ar. Dillsburg 

" Harrisburg 



Philadelphia., 

New York 

Baltimore 



C'bg 
Acc. 



No.12 



6 10 

6 32 
53 

7 18 
7 42 



8 03 

11 25 
2 03 
11 15 
A. M. 



Ky'e 
Exp 



No. 2 



A. M. 

6 15 

7 00 

7 40 

8 09 
8 30 

8 55 

9 15 
9 40 

10 04 



10 25 

1 25 
4 03 
3 10 
P. M. 



Mr'g Day 
Mail Exp 



No. 4 No. 6 



9 05 
"956 



10 30 

1 25 
4 03 
3 10 
P. M. 



11 25 

11 48 

12 08 
12 30 
12 50 

115 
1 40 



2 00 

6 50 
9 38 
6 45 

P. M. 



Ev'g 
Mail 



No. 8 



P. M. 

2 30 

3 20 

4 10 

4 36 

5 00 
5 30 

5 51 

6 17 
6 43 



7 05 

11 15 
3 50 
10 40 
P. M. 



N'gt 
Exp 



No.10 



P. M. 

3 20 

4 50 
710 
736 
8 00 
816 

8 53 

9 20 
9 43 

10 05 

A. M. 

4 30 
7 33 
6 20 
AM. 



Additional trains will leave Carlisle daily except Sunday at 
5:55 a. m., 7:68 a. m., 3:40 p. m., stopping at all intermediate 
stations, arriving at Harrisburg at 6:40 a. m., 8:03 a. m., 4:30 
p. m. 

Evening Mail runs daily between Harrisburg and Cham 
bersburg. 



Up Trains. 



Lv. Baltimore 

" New York .. .. 
" Philadelphia.. 



" Harrisburg. 

" Dillsburg 

" Mechanicsburg . 

" Carlisle 

" Newville 

" Shippensburg.... 

" Chambersburg.. 

" Greencastle 

" Hagerstown 

" Martinsburg 

Ar. Winchester 



Win 


Me's 


Hag 


Ev'g 


C'bg 


N. O. 


Acc. 


Exp 


Acc. 


Mail 


Acc. 


Exp- 


No. 1 


No. 3 


No. 5 No. 7 


No.17 


No. 9 


P. M. 


A. M. 


a. sr. 


A. M. 


P. M. 


p. sr. 


11 40 


'4 45 


8 53 


1120 


2 15 


4 23 


8 00 


12 15 




9 00 


200 


2 06 


11 20 


4 30 


8 50 


11 50 


2 20 


4 30 


A. M. 


a. sr. 


P. M. 


p. sr. 


P. M. 


P. M. 


4 40 


7 53 


12 40 


3 40 


520 


8 00 


5 03 


8 13 


1 03 


4 01 


5 41 


8 20 


5 30 


8 36 


129 


4 25 


6 05 


8 44 


555 


900 


1 52 


455 


6 36 


9 08 


6 15 


9 21 


213 


510 


6 57 


9 29 


6 40 


9 43 


2 35 


535 


7 20 


9 50 


7 02 


10 04 


3 01 


5 50 




10 12 


725 


10 27 


3 25 


6 18 




10 35 


9 30 


11 12 




7 02 






11 00 


12 00 




7 50 






A. sr. 


A. M. 


p. sr. 


P. sr. 


P. SI. 


A. sr. 



Additional trains will leave Harrisburg daily except Sunday 
at 10:35 a. m.. 10:45 p. m., arriving at Carlisle at 11:20 a. m., 
11:30 p. m., stopping at all intermediate stations ; additional 
train will leave Hagerstown at 8:00 a. m., arriving at 11:00 
a. m., stopping at all intermediate stations. 

Pullman PalaceSleepingCars between Hagerstown and New 
York on Keystone Express and Night Express east, and on 
Memphis Express and New Orleans Express west. 

Pullman Sleeping Cars on Night Express and New Orleans 
Express between Philadelphia and New Orleans. 

IF you wish to advertise anything anywhere at any time, 
write to GEO. P. ROWELL & Co., No. 10 Spruce Street, 
New York. 

EVERY one in need of information on the subject of ad- 
vertising will do well to obtain a copy of "Book for 
Advertisers, 1 1 368 pages, price one dollar. Mailed, postage 
Paid, on receipt of price. Contains a careful compilation from 
the American Newspaper Directory of all the best papers 
and class journals; gives the circulation rating of every one, 
and a good deal of information about rates ana other matters 
Pertaining to the business of advertising. Address ROW- 
ELL'S ADVERTISING BUREAU, 10 Spruce Street, New 
York. 



"Everybody's Law Book," 

la the title of the new 768 page work now in press, 
repared by J. Alexander Koones, L L. B., member 
"f the New York Bar. 

It enables every man and woman to be their own 
lawyer. It teaches what are your rights and how to 
maintain them. When to begin a law suit and when 
to shun one. It contains the useful information 
every business man needs in every State in the Un- 
ion. It contains business forms of every variety 
Useful to the lawyer as well as to all who have legal 
business to transact. 

Inclose two dollars for a copy, or inclose two-cent 
Postage stamp for a table of contents and terms to 
agents. Address BENJ. W. HITCHCOCK, Pub- 
sr, 385 Sixth Avenue, New York. 



W. F. BECKER. 



J. P. BRUGGER. 



— THE 

Eastern Book Store, 

315 Market St., Harrisburg, Pa. 
BOOKS AW J) STATIONERY. 

Special Kates to Students. 

W~ Second-Hand School Books a Specialty. 

WRITE FOR PRICES. 



J 



L. SAYLOR & SONS, 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

CARRIAGES, 

LIGHT BUGGIES, PONY PHAETONS, ETC. 
STRICTLY FIRST CLASS. 

Shops Opposite Eagle Hotel, ANNVILLE, PA 



B. MARSHALL, M. D., 

No. 34 East Main Street, 

ANNVILLE, PA. 



ISAAC MANN & SON, 

LARGEST CLOTHIERS, 

834 Cumberland Street, 

LEBANON, T>A. 

THE BEST GOODS FOR THE LEAST MONEY. 

T R. McCATJLY, 
DAILY MEAT MARKET. 

GOOD MEAT. LOW PRICES. ANNVILLE. PA. 



J 



OHN TRUMP, 
BOOT AND SHOE MAKER, 

ANNVILLE, PA. 



WS. SEABOLD, 
. DEALER IN 

Drugs, Medicines, Perfumery and Toilet Articles, 

No. 2 East Main St., Annville, Pa. 



J. 



S. KENDIG, 

33 ./V. EZ J^. "XT , 

Next Door to Eagle Hotel, Annville, Pa. 



w 



J. KIEFER, M. D., 
HOMEOPATHIC PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON. 

76 West Main St., Annville, Pa. 

DEXTER LIVERY AND BOARDING STABLE 
RAILROAD ST., ANNVILLE, PA. 

R. A. MAULFAIR, - PROP'R 

GOOD TEAMS AT REASONABLE BATES. 



80 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



^yiLLIAM KIEBLER, 
SHAVING AND HAIR DRESSING, 

Eagle Hotel Barber Shop, Annville, Pa. 

ADAM B. HESS, 
OFFICE AT THE HOTEL EAGLE. 
OMNIBUS TO ALL TRAINS. 

ANNVILLE, PA. 

JACOB SARGENT, 
FASHIONABLE TAILOR, 

18 and 30 Main St., Annville, Pa. 

\R Y GOODS, NOTIONS, GRO- 
CERIES, BOOTS and SHOES, 

—AND— 

GENTS' FURNISHING GOODS. 

J. 2B, SHOPB, 

ANNVILLE, pa. 

AC. M. HEISTER, 
• STATIONERY JOB PRINTER, 

Visiting Cards a Specialty. 

35 S. White Oak Street - - Annville, Pa. 

WILLIAM WALTZ, 
FASHIONABLE 

HAIR CUTTING AND SHAVING SALOON, 

West Main Street, Annville, Pa. 



D 1 



H. H. KKEIDEB. JKO. E. HERB. 

KREIDER & CO., 
DEALERS IN ALL KINDS OF 

Hard & Soft Coal, Grain, Seeds Salt & Feed. 

Office : Railroad Street, near Depot, 
Telephone Connection. ANNVILLE, PA. 



nj^HE 



BEST 



LOWEST 



STOCK, THE 

PRICES IN 

FURNITURE, jose ^ a ,5Tl"l E rs. 

ANNYILLK, PA. 



3VE. H- SHAUD, 

DEALER IN 

Gold Watches and Jewelry, 

Wholesale and Retail Dealer in 
FINE CANDIES AND FRUITS. 

Families and Entertainments Supplied with OYS. 

ANNiriLLE, PA. 



TEKS AND CREAM. 



S. M. SHENK'S BAKERY, 

HAS ALWAYS ON HAND 

FRESH BREAD, CAKES AND ROLLS, 

One Door West Penn'a House, Annville. 



S. 33. -VV-A-CHSriEr*., 

— ^>t- Headquarters t or -v- — 

GROCERIES, CONFECTIONERIES 

OYSTERS, FRUITS AND NUTS. 
Restaurant Attached. Meals at All Hours. 

12 West Main Street, Annville, Pa. 



If yon want to Bny a Hat rint, and a right Hat, or anything in 
Men's Furnishings, 

GO TO 

successors to RAITT & CO., 
Eighth and Cumber/and Sts., Lebanon, Pa. 

ANNVILLE, PA., 

Dealers in Dry Goods, Notions 

and Ladies' Dress Goods. 

Men's Suitings we make a Specialty. Home-made, 
Ingrain and Brussels Carpets. You huy Cheaper 
from us than away from home, and have a large 
stock to select from. 

THE 

U.B. MUTUAL AID SOCIETY 

OF PENNSYLVANIA. 1 

HOME OFFICE, LEBANON, PENNA. 

Chartered hy the State Legislature, March 11, 18G9. 
Positive amounts guaranteed and claims paid in 

Benefits of $1000 insurance secured for $8.r>0. 
Reciprocal Circle Insurance,new and very popular. 

Invested Assets $146,809.SH 

Contingent Assets 

Assessment Basis 2'S?'V22'2? 

Death Losses Paid 6,7/4,12^.01 

THE PLAN". 

The payment of EIGHT DOLLARS on application, 
FIVE DOLLARS annually for four years, and there- 
after TWO DOLLARS annually during life, with 
pro rata mortality assessments for each death of a 
member insured for $1000, is as follows: 



Age. 


Ass't 


Age. 


Ass'mt 


20 


65 


30 


75 


21 


66 


31 


77 


22 


67 


32 


79 


23 


68 


33 


81 


24 


69 


34 


83 


25 


70 


35 


85 


26 


71 


36 


86 


27 


72 


37 


87 


28 


73 


38 


88 


29 


74 


39 


89 



40 

41 

42 
43 
44 
45 
46 
47 
4S 
49 



Ass'mt 



90 
92 
94 
96 
98 
1 0!) 
1 06 
1 12 
1 18 
1 24 



A.GE. 


Assm't 


50 


1 30 


51 


1 40 


52 


1 59 


53 


1 60 


54 


1 70 


55 


1 80 


56 


1 92 















This will entitle a member to a certificate ot $10W 
to be paid after death to the legal beneficiary, wueu 
ever such death may occur. 

Reliable Agents Wanted Everywhere. 



CHOICE BEEF, LAMB, VEAL, PORK AND 
V^, TONGUES at 

Maulfair's Daily Meat Market, 

ANNVILLE, PA. 



Volume VI. 



Number 10. 



THE 

College Forum. 



DECEflBER, 1893. 



. •*• CONTENTS : + . 



PAGE 

Editorials 81 

Unjust Class Legislation 82, 83 

Uncrowned Heroes 83-85 

Financial Perplexities 85, 86 

Church Council at Johnstown, Pa. . . . 86-88 

r on by an L. V. C. Student 88 

College Directory - . . . . 89 

Philokosmian Literary Society 89 

Clionian Literary Society 89 

ersonals and Locals 89, 90 

he Clionian Anniversary 90, 91 



PAGE 

Oratorical Exercises 91, 92 

Public Rhetorical Exercises 92 

Week of Prayer 92, 93 

Book Reception 93 

Pictures and Records of the Great Football 

Teams 93 

Wonderful Progress of the Press . . . . 93, 94 

Prince Rupert's Drops 94 

Proper Breathing Movements 94 

Advertisements 94-96 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE, 
ANNVILLE, PA. 



HARRY LIGHT, 

BOOKS AND STATIONERY, 

22 EAST MAIN ST., ANNVILLE, PA. 



Our shelves are constantly filled with 
New, Second-Hand and Shelf-Worn 



Schools CollegeTextBooks. 



o 
f 
o 



pa 
o 

< 

o 7 £ 

X a 

W Together with a Complete Assortment of ° 



Q 

< 

•J 

w 
or) 

m 
w 



STATIONERY, w 

Wall Paper and Window Shades, s 



A Selected Stock of the 

LATEST STYLES OF WALL PAPER 

AND 

DECORATIONS. 



w 
o 
o 

C0 



SCHOOL AND COLLEGE TEXT BOOKS A SPECIALTY. 

C- SMITH, 
Ollflil IQ0I Sf 011, 

ANNVILLE, PA. 
HEADQUARTERS FOR 

COLLEGE Hi SCHOOL SUPPLIES, 

INCLUDING 
NORMAL DEPARTMENT. 
OLD BOOKS. NEW BOOKS. 

Cheapest place in the Lebanon Valley to buy your 
Books. 4@" New and Old Books Bought, 
Sold and Exchanged. 

WATCHES, CLOCKS AND JEWELRY, 

SILVER PLATED WARE, 

Spectacles a Specialty, rittecl %^& a Gold ' 

PERFECT FOCLS AND FIT GUARANTEED. 

ISAAC WOLF, 

LEBANON'S LEADING CLOTHIER, 

ONE PRICE ONLY . 

SATISFACTION GUARANTEED. 

828 CUMBERLAND STREET. 



ON MARKET ST., AT THE RIYER BRIDGE, 

HARRISBURG-, PA. 

CARPETS, OIL CLOTHS, ETC. 




Always sold at the Lowest Cash Prices. All Goods 
Guaranteed to be as represented. Rag and Ingrain 
Carpets 25 cents per yard up. Floor anil Table Oil 
Cloths 25 cents per yard up. 

FRED. W. YINGST, on Market St., at (he Bridge. 

BOOKS! BOOKS! BOOKS! 



When you need Books or Stationery of any kind 
correspond with or call on us. By so doing you will 
secure the Best Goods at the most Favorable Prices. 

Stock always New and Fresh. Assortment Large. 
Prices the Lowest. Whether you intend to buy 250.' 
or $25.00 worth, it will pay you to call to see us. 

Bagster's and Oxford Teachers' Bibles a Specialty. 
We carry in stock the publications of the U. Bi t 
Publishing House, such as Otterbein Hymnals, 
Hymns of the Sanctuary, the Books used in the 
three years' course of study, S. S. Music Books. 'A 

AGENTS WANTED to sell the best and most 
popular Lord's Prayer published. Send 75 cents for 
sample copy, worth $2.00. Address plainly 

CRIDER & BROTHER, 

PUBLISHERS OF 




Photograph Family Records, Etc, Etc., 



YORK, PA. 



PLEASE MENTIOX "THE COLLEGE FOJtTTM." 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 

Vol. VI. No. 10. ANNVILLE, PA., DECEMBER, 1893. Whole No. 66. 



EDITORS. 

H. CLAY DEANEK, A. M., 
Editor-in-Chief and Publisher. 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS. 

John H. Maysilles, '95. D. S. Eshelman '91 

William H. Kkeider, '94. 

SOCIETY EDITORS. 

Clionian Society— Miss Maggie Strickler, '94. 
Philokosmian Society— Oscar E. Good, '94. 
alozetean Society— G. A. L. Kindt, '94. 

All communications or items of news slionld be sent to 
the Editor in Chief. Subscriptions should be sent to the 
Publishing Agent. 

THE COLLEGE FORUM will be sent monthly for one 

hool year on receipt of twenty-fire cents. Subscriptions 

'ceired at any time. 

For terms of advertising, address the Publisher. 

Entered at the Post Office at Annville, Pa., as 
econd-class mail matter. 



EfcitortaL 



The Winter Term opens January 2, 
1894. 

Ex-President Kephart celebrated his 
hina wedding on the 4th inst., from 3 to 
o'clock, at his home in Lebanon, Pa. 
'any friends extended congratulations. 
The gifts w r ere very pretty and numerous. 

With this issue Vol. VI is completed. 
We rejoice that our friends have so gener- 
ously patronized us, which patronage 

ade our existence possible. Many of 
our subscriptions expire with this issue, 
and we hope all will renew and to add 
many new acquaintances to our list. The 
'orum wishes all a Merry Christmas and 

appy New Year. 

Too much can not be said in commen- 
dation of the Clionian Literary Society for 
phe royal reception given to their friends 
on Thanksgiving evening. The parlor, 
music room and dining hall presented the 



appearance of a tropic garden. The very 
air seemed to echo and re-echo a hearty 
welcome from the wearers of the white 
and gold. Even the edibles were tied with 
their colors. There has been a goodly 
number who were victims of the grippe, 
but all recovered without experiencing 
any serious results. Ladies, your generous 
hospitality, good wishes and kindness will 
ever be referred to with much pleasure. 
Everything was distinctively Clionian. 

We give the proceedings of the Educa- 
tional meeting at Johnstown, Pa., in full. 
We hope all who have not seen them in 
the Telescope will read them thoroughly. 
The suggestions are timely and indicate 
that our church has at last awoke to a 
realization of the condition of her colleges. 
We await the letter from the Bishops with 
great interest. 

Football season is over, and an oppor- 
tunity is given the public to pass judg- 
ment upon the game whether it shquld be 
prohibited as being grossly brutal or whe- 
ther it conduces to the welfare of Student 
life and makes those who engage in it 
strong physically or physical wrecks. 
Its devotees have only good to say of it, 
while the public loudly demands its pro- 
hibition. Legitimate college athletics are 
what is demanded, but if the game and 
the college which supports it are alike to 
have public sanction there must be a re- 
form in the game to remove the attendant 
evils. Too many lives have been sacri- 
ficed the past season, and too many of our 
best sons have become wrecked physi- 
cally for life. The game has been a very 
costly luxury as played the past season. 



T 



82 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



Unjust Class Legislation. 

The discovery of gold in California 
gave a sudden impulse to immigration to- 
ward the Pacific coast. Miles of immi- 
grant wagons crossed tkfc Rockies, jour- 
neying to a land where it was supposed 
fortunes were in store for all who 
would grasp them. 

The influx of immigration had increased 
to such an extent that villages which for- 
merly were composed of several cabins in 
a few months became cities having a pop- 
ulation of thousands. These cities were 
chiefly situated upon the coast of the Pa- 
cific, extending from Cape Flattery to the 
southern part of California, and having as 
their metropolis the beautiful city of San 
Francisco, whose harbor was in every way 
adapted to commerce, but on account of 
the Chinese empire being closed to the 
outside world, it was practically of no 
value except for commerce with a few 
islands. 

The United States used strenuous ef- 
forts to have China open her ports to 
American vessels, and finally she suc- 
ceeded, the result of which was the Bur- 
lingame treaty in 1869. The tidings of 
the treaty were heralded with great joy 
from one part of the country to the other, 
each American citizen rejoicing in the fact 
that another great achievement for Amer- 
ica would be recorded in the annals of 
history. 

The principal clause of the treaty is 
that in which we as Americans recognize 
the right of man to change his home and 
allegiance, and that he shall be protected 
by the laws of the country in which he 
shall reside. 

The treaty met with general approbation 
until in 1880, the Americans originated an 
idea that the Chinese laborers in this 
country were too numerous, and accord- 
ingly the Scott Exclusion Act was passed, 
suspending the immigration of Chinese la- 
bor, but providing that all Chinese laborers 
now in this country shall be allowed to go 
and come of their own free will and ac- 
cord, and shall be accorded all the rights 
and privileges which are accorded to citi 
zeds of the most favored nation. 

The Chinese never raised a voice in 
dissension, but peaceably submitted to the 
act, as they are acknowledged to be an in- 
offensive, law-abiding and industrious 
race, willing to undertake work refused 
by the white man. 

Although their costumes and manners 



are dissimilar to ours, yet this should not 
raise our enmity towards them. They 
toil daily, wash and iron our apparel, till 
our soil by their own ingenious methods 
Of irrigation, and reap the fruits from our 
massive vineyards for our benefit and en- 
joyment. For this they receive a nominal 
sum, and after having amassed a fortune 
of several thousand dollars, return to their 
native land. 

They cannot vote, hence they become 
the enemy of both political parties, and 
are not caressed like the German or Irish- 
man, but become the fuel of political pre- 
judice. They do not conduct beer-saloons, 
or beat their wives after returning home 
from a carousal ; neither do they beg nor 
steal, but honestly earn their rice, which 
is their daily subsistence. 

They are consistent believers in the 
doctrines of Confuscius, but are not be- 
lievers in that religion which is daily en- 
deavoring to overthrow our public school 
system and government. 

The Chinese question has been more of 
a political than a moral question. It was 
used by both political parties in the cam- 
paign of 1892, and to satisfy the demands 
of the ignorant Thomas J. Geary, of Cali- 
fornia, introduced into the House what is 
termed the Geary law, which provides that 
all Chinamen must register within one 
year from date, and any Chinaman con- 
victed of not being lawfully in this coun- 
try shall be deported to China after being 
imprisoned at hard labor for one year ; it 
also requires him to procure from the 
revenue collector a certificate of resi- 
dence. Should he fail to procure said 
certificate on account of sickness or some 
other cause, his claim must be substanti- 
ated by at least one white witness. 

The act was passed the fifth of May, 
1892, after receiving a fifteen minutes' de- 
bate in the House. 

Thus a law whose provisions are ob- 
noxious, insulting and barbarous received 
but little discussion, and passed upon our 
Congressional records, being in direct 
violation of the Buiiingame treaty and the 
Scott Exclusion Act. 

This law did not seem to satisfy the 
demands of the prejudiced; accordingly) 
immediately after the repeal of the silver 
bill, a bill called the McCreary Act was 
introduced and passed by the House 
which provides that the time of registra- 
tion be increased six months, that to 
establish his identification he can use any 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



S3 



creditable witness other than a Chinaman, 
and that his photograph mnst be affixed 
to the certificate and a duplicate retained 
by the government. 

Should we be surprised if such a law 
would raise the indignation of China ? 

We treat her rulers as we would the 
chiefs of the Congo, forgetting that the 
rulers of China are statesmen, gifted and 
courteous. We require her subjects to 
have a certificate, which lowers them to 
the dogs of our cities, who are required to 
have tags to save them from the pound- 
man's cage, and if found without such 
■certificate they will be imprisoned at hard 
labor for one year, thus putting him on a 
level with lowest thieves and criminals, and 
clothing him in the stripes of the convict. 

The number of American missionaries 
in China to-day number about one thou- 
sand ; these are all guarded by officers of 
the Empire, placed there at the desire of 
cur government, and if any loss is sus- 
tained our government does not hesitate 
to claim indemnity for said injury while at 
the same time the Chinese in America are 
left to be stoned and persecuted b}^ howl- 
ing mobs without any protection from 
cur government. 

If this law is enacted our missionaries 
cannot remain in China; they will be ex- 
pelled from the country as it is but human 
nature to give "tit for tat." 

Thus the only true religion will be 
trodden under foot and Buddhism and the 
religion of Confuscius be established in 
its stead. 

Passing such an ignominious law we do 
not try to convert the heathen in our 
native land, but treat them as criminals, 
and instead of raising them to a higher 
state of civilization, deprive them of the 
Christian religion which lies at the founda- 
tion of all good government. 

The prejudiced and ignorant would 
advance the argument that numerous 
Chinese came to this country in violation 
cf the Act of 1880. It is a fact well as- 
certained that not a single Chinaman 
came direct from China to this country; 
they all embarked at the port of "Victoria, 
in the British province of Hong Kong, 
and the Emperor of China has no more 
jurisdiction over emigration from this 
port than he has over emigration from 
Liverpool. 

Although our imports exceeds our ex- 
ports, yet it is to our interest to have the 
trade of the richest country in the world. 



The protection of the American laborer 
lies in the restriction of immigration, but 
that is a poor and an unjust principle 
which restricts one class and gives liberties 
to another class equally as debased. 

The law is defective, as it does not pro- 
vide ways and means for its execution, 
but simply imprisons a man without an 
indictment by a grand jury and trial by a 
jury. This is contra^ to international 
law and belongs to the times when bar- 
barians ruled this country. 

America has violated the treaties and 
not China ; she has not been true to the 
pledges made a generation ago, and now 
places the blame upon an inoffensive race. 
Consider the question from |he idea of 
right and wrong and fling race prej udice 
and political gains to the winds, remem- 
bering that the Golden Rule and the laws 
of justice are applicable even among 
nations. 

We are a unit in expressing our hatred 
toward Russia in her expulsion of the 
Jews, but our mouths are sealed when we 
are reminded of the fact that the same is 
being done with the Chinese in our 
country. 

Let us maintain the equality of human 
rights, that eveiy man is born free and 
equal and is entitled to life, liberty and 
the pursuit of happiness, and declare that 
issues reaching down into the very heart 
of civilized government and involving 
our national honor and prosperity are 
not to be decided by such a frivola us de- 
cree as the Geary Law. 

W. H. Kreider, '94. 



Uncrowned Heroes. 

The world knows very little of its 
greatest men. At first thought this state- 
ment may seem misleading, but upon 
more careful consideration it is known to 
be only too true. 

The heroes of the world not only in- 
clude the kings and queens, who wear the 
royal crowns, but many of their uncrowned 
subjects, whose conduct in the quiet of 
private life is more worthy of laurels than 
the one whose head bears the insignia of 
royalty. 

The general and the captain are crowned 
with honor by their titles, while there are 
private soldiers whose deeds of daring 
and braveiy are of such a character that 
their names should be forever enrolled 
upon the illustrious pages of fame and 



84 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



honor, but too frequently they are con- 
signed to obscurity — " unwept, unhonored 
and unsung." 

"The hand that rocks the cradle moves 
the world and " The Mother is queen of 
the home," are expressions which are fre- 
quently heard. True they are, but let us 
remember that she is a queen without a 
crown. 

Heroic deeds are not always reserved for 
the field of battle. There are some events 
occurring in the quiet of every day life which 
call forth more courage, resolution and 
real true heroism than it does to face the 
fire of the enemy. From the many in- 
stances of noble, patriotic and chivalrous 
devotion to all that is pure and right, we 
would glean a few illustrations to show 
the uncrowned heroes and heroines who 
most willingly consider duty more than 
life. 

Among this number is William Jasper, 
a youthful hero of the Revolution. When 
Fort Moultrie was attacked in IT 76, deso- 
lation and havoc cast a gloomy shadow 
on all sides. Apparently the cause of 
freedom was about to suffer. In the heat 
of the struggle a cannon ball struck the 
flagstaff, which held the emblem so sacred 
to the heart of every loyal American and 
bore it to the earth. 

Shouts of victory arose from the enemy, 
but the God who presides over the des- 
tinies of nations decreed otherwise. Be- 
fore the situation was fully realized Jas- 
per leaped over the ramparts, seized the 
ensign, already stained with blood, and, 
placing it on his weapon, unfurled it to the 
breeze, crying aloud, " Heaven save liberty 
and my country." 

We would riot forget to mention the 
queens who do not wear a crown. His- 
torians praise the sons, and confer signal 
honor upon them, but the mothers are 
almost ignored. They fail to realize the 
fact that every department of human en- 
ergy and excellence bears evidence to the 
truth that whatever the mother is that will 
the son be also. Some of these queens 
were surrounded by the most adverse in- 
fluences, yet, ever true to that noblest and 
best gift of God to man— a mother's love 

they struggled bravely onward until the 

character of their sons was so firmly 
molded and fashioned that the trials and 
temptations of life could not overcome the 
home influence. 

Among this number of noble women 
were the mothers of the Wesley s, Wash- 



ington, Lincoln and Garfield. Garfield's 
mother was a woman of executive ability r 
perseverance, ambition, fortitude and in- 
domitable courage. Early in life she was 
left a widow with four small children. 
She lived on a little farm, covered with 
debt, in what was then almost a wilder- 
ness. Working early and late, and de- 
priving herself of proper food, she man- 
aged to provide for her children. She 
taught them temperance, love of liberty 
and lo3 r alty to their country and to their 
God. At her proposal a school-house was 
erected, the widow herself giving the land 
from her scanty acres. She lived to see 
her children honored and respected by all 
who knew them, and her youngest son 
occupy the Presidential chair. 

The cause of freedom had no nobler 
friend than Wendell Phillips. His un- 
crowned heroism deserves more than a 
passing notice. He prepared himself for 
law, but a good cause presented itself, so 
he threw himself heart and soul into it. 
Massachusetts was accustomed to bestow 
honor upon her most gifted sons, and 
there was scarcely a young man in Boston 
whose social relations, education and per- 
sonal character better fitted him for suc- 
cess than Wendell Phillips. But he had 
the courage and moral power to resist all 
such ambitions or aspirations and devote- 
himself to what he deemed a righteous 
cause. 

The crisis was reached when he saw 
Garrison dragged through the streets, his 
clothing almost torn from him and a rope- 
around his waist. This roused him thor- 
oughly, and he became an avowed Abo- 
litionist. The cause was ably defended 
by his brilliant oratorical powers. His 
fidelity, no less than his eloquence, en- 
deared him to his associates, and his 
winning manners charmed all who met 
him in social life. His warm words of 
friendship and ceaseless deeds of charity 
were quietly and wisely bestowed. 

His home was a haven of refuge for the 
unfortunate and friendless fugitives. By 
public and private speech and through 
the medium of the press he exerted a 
powerful influence for the freedom of this 
oppressed race. No American life offers 
to future generations a nobler example of 
unswerving fidelity to conscience and to 
public duty; and no other American in 
private life did as much as to make the 
American flag the flag of hope for mankind. 
His was truly the consecration of a life 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



85 



hidden with God and in sympathy with 
man. 

Thus we might cite you the names of 
scores of men and women who are worthy 
of the highest praise. They are earnest, 
energetic, self-sacrificing men and always 
loyal to the interests of truth and justice. 
Men who would readily exclaim, " Millions 
for defense, but not one cent for tribute," 
or " I am not worth purchasing, but such 
as I am the King of Great Britain is not 
rich enough to buy me." In short, men 
a-nd women who conquered self— a greater 
victory than that which is- gained on the 
field of battle. 

G. K. Hartman, '94. 



Financial Perplexities. 

The American College was born amid 
poverty. Scarcely had our Pilgrim Fathers 
set foot upon this fair land till they 
planted Harvard College, and watered it 
with prayerful tears. She grew up with 
liberty and Christianity. Each in turn 
strengthened the oiher. They endowed 
Harvard with their riches — that of pov- 
erty, but true liberality. She was among 
their first thoughts. They cherished her 
as a child. Theirs was deep poverty. " One 
brought a piece of cotton stuff, valued at 
nine shillings; another a pewter pot of 
some value; a third, a fruit dish or spoon, 
and a large and small salt cellar." 

Yale was founded by clergymen giving 
from their private libraries forty volumes 
that Protestant religion may be upheld. 

Amherst was born of prayers and tears. 
Friends in the vicinity furnished materials 
and built the walls with their own hands. 
Those at a distance sent money, or what- 
ever they could spare that could be used 
to support the institution. 

Lebanon Valley, our own College, was 
the result of prayer and love for Christ's 
church. Amid the darkest surroundings, 
a few consecrated men gave of their 
means to plant a college, which would 
save our children for the Church and pro- 
mote true piet}\ Her history has been 
one of struggle. Many sacrifices were 
made which have been blessed of God. 
How the students have given of their 
muscle many of the students of former 
years have repeatedly told. We need not 
go back but to the time when the chapel 
was frescoed to appreciate how hard stu- 
dents have worked and how they sacrificed 
in her behalf. 



We might give the inception of other 
colleges of our Church, but the history of 
one is the history of all. All colleges 
from their \evy beginning had financial 
perplexities, and have them to-day. These 
hoi}- men in planting the colleges have 
consecrated their mites, and the Lord has 
heard their prayers and most wonderfully 
blessed their sacrifices. If our church 
out of its munificence, would give a mite 
our colleges would be free of debt and 
be endowed in the next year. 

It is thought ~by many that our oldest 
institutions are so fully endowed and 
equipped that they need have no more 
solicitude about their finances. Notwith- 
standing their millions of endowment the 
expenditures exceed their receipts. So 
serious had become the financial condition 
of some of these colleges that suspension 
had been seriously considered a few years 
ago. Even during the past summer our 
daily papers told us how the University 
of Chicago was unable to pay her profes- 
sors. 

The old and heavily endowed colleges 
charge a tuition that is three or four times 
that of our own. If they, with their large 
endowment, and over a $100 tuition per 
year for each student, can not meet ex- 
penses, how can we expect Lebanon Val- 
ley College, with her meagre endowment 
and small tuition, to do it. The same is 
true of the other colleges of our Church. 
It is unjust to expect them to do it. It 
cannot be done. How the colleges get 
along as well as they do is a profound 
mystery. They surely have learned the 
art of making bricks without straw. If 
the same punishment is inflicted upon the 
Church as was upon the oppressors of the 
Israelites, woe be unto us. If we, as a 
Church, say we have done all we could do 
we are not truthful. 

The financial question has been the 
great question for old and young insti- 
tutions. How to solve it is as difficult 
to-day as in the past. A productive en- 
dowment, sufficiently large to meet the 
annual expenses will solve it, but how get 
the endowment. The solution is as great 
a difficulty as the difficulty. No institu- 
tion can live without money. None can 
become efficient without it; can maintain 
those ideas which gave birth to them. If 
they can't live, the inevitable must follow 
— they will die. To die is not all, her re- 
mains will be a reproach upon the 
Church's liberalit} 1 - and an insult to God. 



86 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



the matter 



The Church has not given 
serious thought I am sure. 

By some the perplexing finances are 
thought to be due to mismanagement. 
There may not have always been that 
business-like scrutiny that should have 
been. Mistakes have been made. We 
all have made the same mistakes in our 
own business. Why find fault with others 
for doing the same thing we ourselves 
did ? Let us be consistant and not ex- 
cuse ourselves for not doing our duty to 
our College. 

Let us try to find the true cause of 
these perplexities. It is a fact that no 
higher institution receives sufficient tu- 
ition to meet the legitimate expenses. 
Debts will accrue rapidly unless this de- 
ficit is met. Then is it any wonder that 
our colleges are yearly accumulating 
debts ? They can't do otherwise. This 
question meets us as a church squarely, 
and calls upon us to solve it honorably 
and like Christian men. Will we do it ? 
If not, the disgrace is inevitable. 

Two solutions have been given. That 
of suspending our colleges till we can 
support them or endow them. 

As to the first, if we are not able to 
support them now, when will we be ? A 
church that has millionaires and a large 
membership that are in affluence and too 
poor to support her colleges must be 
poor indeed. From every quarter of our 
Zion I hear no, a thousand times no. We 
will never suspend. We have the money 
to endow, but why don't we ? To do or 
not to do it is to decide our future 
destiny as a church. The church has 
called the colleges into existence because 
she needed them and could not live with- 
out them. What would you think of a 
mother who would leave her faithful child 
to want and misery when she was sur- 
rounded with abundance ? Is it not even 
worse when that child has saved the 
mother's life ? Such is what the college 
did for the church. The church says we 
ought to endow. Saying what we ought to 
do, does not do it. Experience has 
taught us that prayer opens up the way. 
What prayer will not do, no other means 
can accomplish. As prayer and works go 
together, we should pray more for our 
colleges, then we would talk more about 
them and pay more towards their support 
A more suitable time for the church to 
petition a throne of Grace would be on 
the Day of Prayer for colleges which will 



be observed the last Thursday of January 
next. 

The colleges of our church can be 
easily endowed if we will simply give as 
we give to support the other interests of 
the church. Let the whole church give, 
and talk of our colleges from a sense of 
church pride, and none of them will go 
begging, but will be the pride of every 
true United Brethren. 

A Friend. 



Church Council at Johnstown, Pa. 

A special meeting of the bishops, gen- 
eral officers, school men, ministers, and lay- 
men of the Church met, at the call of 
Bishop J. Weaver, at Johnstown, Pa., Nov. 
28, 1893, in the United Brethren church. 

There were present : Bishop Jonathan 
Weaver, D. D. (bishop emeritus), of Day- 
ton, Ohio ; Bishop E. B. Kephart, D. D. t 
LL. D., of Baltimore, Maryland ; Bishop 
N. Castle, D. D., of Elkhart, Ind.; Bishop 
J. W. Hott, D. D., of Cedar Rapids, Iowa ; 
T. J. Sanders, Ph. D., president of Otter- 
bein University, Ohio; E. Benj. Bierman, 
Ph. D., president of Lebanon Valley Col- 
lege, Pennsylvania ; A. P. Funkhouser, A. 
M., president of Western College, Iowa; 
George P. Hott, A. M., principal of Shen- 
andoah Institute, Virginia ; Rev. W. M. 
Bell, general missionary secretary, Day- 
ton, Ohio ; Rev. D. R. Miller, general man- 
ager of Union Biblical Seminary, Dayton T 
Ohio; Rev. C. W. Miller, general financial 
agent of Otterbein University; L. W. 
Stahl, presiding elder in Allegheny Con- 
ference ; D. D. Lowery, presiding elder in 
East Pennsylvania Conference; Mr. D. 
W. Crider, York, Pa ; Mr. John Thomas, 
Johnstown, Pa.; also a number of pas- 
tors, among whom were L. F. John, 
Johnstown, Pa. ; L. Keister, Wilkinsburg, 
Pa.; W. R. Funk, Greensburg, Pa.; J. L. 
Grimm, Otterbein Memorial Church, Balti- 
more ; A. M. Long, Willmore, Pa. ; E. U. 
Hoenshel, Tyrone, Pa.; 0. T. Stewart,. 
Cambria, Pa'.; J. L. Lichliter, Moxham, 
Pa.; J. H. Pershing, Coalport, Pa.; W. H. 
Spangler, Johnstown, Pa.; W. William- 
son, Canton, Ohio, and many others. 

On motion of Bishop E. B. Kephart r 
Bishop J. Weaver was made chairman. 
After singing " Nearer My God to Thee,' r 
Rev. D. R. Miller led in prayer. Geo. P. 
Hott, of Dayton, Va., was chosen sec- 
retary. 

Bishop Weaver made remarks, advising 



IB 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



87 



retrenchment in the various interests of 
the Church, emphasizing the needs of the 
educational work. 

On motion of Bishop J. W. Hott, all 
members of the Church who came to par- 
ticipate may be regarded as members of 
the council. 

A letter from President Brooke, of Le- 
compton, Kan., was read, relative to the 
educational work in Kansas ; also one 
from Rev. T. D. Adams, general manager 
of Western College, relative to the finances 
of our colleges ; also one from Rev. M. S. 
Drury, relative to the finances of Western 
College ; also a lengthy paper from Kansas 
as to the best interests of the Church as 
related to the several conferences and 
schools in that State. The letter was ad- 
dressed to Bishop Kephart, president of 
the general Board of Education, and was 
signed by Revs. E. B. Slade, M. R. Myer 
C. U. McKee, and M. Jennings. 

Rev. C. W. Miller spoke of the many 
doors open to the Church, insisting on the 
fuller support of our educational institu- 
tions by the wealthier portion of the 
Church. 

Bishop Kephart spoke of the need of 
strengthening the educational work of the 
Church. 

Bishop Hott spoke of the importance 
of learning how to get more money and 
how to spend less money. He said busi- 
ness men would not give money to meet 
present debts until it is understood that 
the expenditures of our schools will be 
brought within their income. 

Bishop N. Castle thought it not judi- 
cious to multiply financial agents at 
present ; that in the several school circles 
general counsels should be held among 
managers, ministers and laymen interested 
in the several schools as to their particu- 
lar management. 

Bishop Weaver announced the Com- 
mittee on Ways and Means : E. B. Kep- 
hart, D. R. Miller, T. J. Sanders, A. P. 
Funkhouser, W. M. Bell, John Thomas, 
J. W. Hott, E. Benjamin Bierman, D. W. 
C rider. 

The time of meeting next was fixed at 
8:30 a. m. A popular meeting was ordered 
for the evening, which was addressed by 
Bishops Castle and Hott, and by Presi- 
dent Sanders. During the evening the 
Committee of Ways and Means was in 
session. 

On motion, the meeting adjourned, with 
the benediction by Bishop Castle. 



SECOND DAY. 

Morning Session. 

Bishop Weaver called the house to 
order at 9:15 a. m. 

Rev. J. L. Grimm led the devotional 
exercises. 

The minutes were read and approved. 

The Committee on Ways and Means 
was called, and Rev. D. R. Miller read its 
report. 

On motion, the paper was considered 
item by item. 

A lengthy discussion followed. Pend- 
ing the adoption of Item 4, the meeting 
adjourned, to meet at 2:00 p. m. The 
benediction was pronounced by Rev. Wm. 
Williamson. 

Afternoon Session. 
Devotion led by President A. P. Funk- 
houser. 

The paper pending was read in full, and 
Item 4 was adopted. It was further 
amended and adopted. 

Following is the report : 

" Whereas, The educational work of 
the Church is fundamental and vital; and, 
Whereas, our attention as a denomination 
has to a* large degree been concentrated 
upon the superstructure, rather than the 
foundation, until the foundation is greatly 
weakened and in danger of being crushed ; 
and, Whereas, the General Conference, in 
its last session, as touching the great 
needs of our educational institutions, ex- 
pressed itself in the following language : 
namely, " In view of the urgent financial 
needs of our institutions of learning 
throughout the Church, the General Con- 
ference recommends that the quadrennium 
of 1893-1897 be devoted to a special effort 
on the part of the authorities and patrons 
to free these institutions from debt, and 
secure for them a complete endowment 
and equipment, and that the bishops give 
special aid to the endeavor by solicita- 
tion, public addre'sses and writing and, 
Whereas, this meeting is called, in har- 
mony with the aforesaid action, to organize 
and take the initiatory steps ; therefore, 
be it 

"Resolved, 1. That the bishops recom- 
mend and authorize, at the earliest practi- 
cal moment, a meeting at the seat of the 
institutions especially in need, or other 
more convenient place, of the friends in 
the cooperating territory, who shall thus 
seek to provide for speedy and permanent 
relief of such institutions. 



88 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



" 2. That the Board of Bishops author- 
ize the observance of a day to be known 
as Educational Day ; that the day be the 
date of the founding of the first institu- 
tion, April 26, or some other day which 
may suit the convenience of the several 
institutions of learning, and earnestby re- 
quest that the editors of our several peri- 
odicals begin at once to write editorially 
on the important work and day, and open 
their columns, and solicit others for a full 
and free setting forth of the value of our 
educational work and its relation to the 
Church, and the paramount need of finan- 
cial aid ; that the day be observed in these 
institutions as those in authorit}' - may 
direct ; and that each minister in charge 
of work, aided by the bishops and other 
general church officers, college presidents, 
professors and others, on the Sundays 
immediately before and after said day, so 
as to use the speakers twice, present the 
cause of education to our people, and so- 
licit a sum that shall aggregate fifty cents 
per capita of our membership, and the 
amount thus obtained may be credited on 
the conference assessment, where such has 
been made for the respective institutions. 

" 3. That all pastors be most Earnestly 
requested to present the claims of Union 
Biblical Seminary at the earliest favorable 
opportunity, and cease not until the full 
amount assessed therefor to their respec- 
tive charges is secured ; and that the pre- 
siding elders be urged to see that Seminary 
assessments receive their full share of 
attention ; and that in public meetings 
provided for above the bishops and those 
conducting them, in connection with their 
appeals for the colleges, call attention to 
the work and needs of the Seminary, and 
urge our people by special donations and 
otherwise to aid the general manager and 
soliciting agents in their effort to place 
this institution upon a very solid financial 
basis. 

" 4. That our institutions of learning be 
relieved of their present embarrassing in- 
debtedness during this quadrennium, we 
recommend that the bishops in an address 
to the Church request our people to unite 
in a hearty financial support of these insti- 
tutions during the quadrennium, as the 
essential work of the period, and that the 
strengthening and maintenance of what 
we have is the dut}^ of the hour ; and that 
we most earnestly request all our institu- 
tions of learning in the future to live 
strictly within the limits of their income. 



" 5. That we most heartily approve of 
the efforts now being made by our various 
institutions of learning, as represented in 
this council, to meet their entire indebted- 
ness." , 

Secretary Bell offered the following, 
which was adopted : 

" Whereas, Our missionary society is 
now giving assistance to our home missions 
in not less than twent3^-seven of our con- 
ferences ; and, Whereas, Our mission in 
Africa is promising great fruitfulness, 
and other foreign fields invite our labors ; 
and, Whereas, Our General Conference 
has called upon the Church to make con- 
tributions to the cause of missions to the 
amount of one hundred thousand dollars 
per 3'ear; and, Whereas, Many of our 
conferences have already placed their as- 
sessments on the one hundred thousand 
dollar line ; therefore, 

" Resolved, That we highly appreciate 
the action of our conferences in making 
said assessments, and the consecration of 
our ministers and people in their earnest 
efforts to reach this much desired goal." 

The secretary was instructed to publish 
the minutes in the Religious Telescope. 

It was suggested that the bishops pre- 
pare an address to the Church, to be pub- 
lished in pamphlet form. 

The meeting then adjourned with the 
benediction b}*- Bishop Weaver. 

The meeting made most careful inquiry 
into the management of the educational 
institutions of the Church, and sends out 
its recommendations with the earnest 
prayer that the Church throughout its 
borders may consecrate itself as never 
before to the cause of Christ in this work. 

Geo. P. Hott, Secretary. 



Won by an L. T. C. Student. 

The Powers Bro.'s, manufacturers of 
the Chautauqua desk, presented Mr. Samuel 
F. Huber, '94, a gold watch, of a most 
handsome design, as the first prize won 
for securing the largest number of orders 
for the desk during the past summer vaca- 
tion. As there were between three and 
four hundred agents in the field, made up 
largely of students from various colleges 
of our country, the honor conferred upon 
an L. Y. C. student is all the greater and 
bespeaks well for Mr. Huber's ability. 



Subscribe for the College Fob,™, and 
get 3*our friends to subscribe. 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



89 



College Directory. 
Faculty. 

E. BENJ. BIERMAN, A. M., Ph. D., 

PRESIDENT, 

Professor of Mental and Moral Science. 
H. CLAY DEANER, A. M., 
Professor of the Latin Language. 
JOHN E. LEHMAN, A. M., 
Professor of Mathematics. 
Rev. JNO. A. McDERMAD, A. M., 
Professor of the Greek Language. 
JOHN A. SHOTT, Ph. B., 
Professor of Natural Science. 
MARY E. SLEICHTER, A. B., 
Professor of English Literature. 

CARRIE M. FLINT, 
Professor of Instrumental Music. 
GERTRUDE ALBERTSON. 
Professor of Harmony and Fine Art. 
HARVEY D. MILLER, B. S., 
Teacher of the Violin. 

Literary Societies. 

CLIONIAN. 
Miss ANNA E. WILSON, President. 
Miss ELLA PENNYPACKER, Secretary. 
KAL OZETEA N; 
SHERIDAN GARMAN, President. 
GEO. A. L. KINDT, Secretary. 
PHILOKOSMIAN. 
D. S. ESHLEMAN, President. 
GEO. H. STEIN, Secretary. 
Y. M. C. A. 
GEO. K. HARTMAN, President. 
HARRY W. MAYER, Secretary. 
Y. W. G. A. 
Miss MAGGIE STRICKLER, President. 
Miss ESTELLA STEHMAN, Secretary. 



Philokosmian Literary Society. 



Esse Quam Videri. 

We have now approached the end of 
another term's work, and no doubt all of 
us are thinking of the manner in which 
our brief vacation days shall be spent. 
The last session of the society was held 
on the evening of the 15th inst. An in- 
teresting and well-prepared programme 
was rendered which all enjoyed, especially 
so, by reason of the fact that our meetings 
have suffered continual interruptions for a 
number of weeks past. 

G. K. Hartman has been ill for some 
time. His father called to see him on the 



11th inst., and two days later he left 
school for his home. We hope that his 
health may be speedily restored, and that 
he may be able to pursue his studies at 
the opening of next term. 

S. F. Huber spent his Thanksgiving va- 
cation, canvassing in Carbon and Luzerne 
counties. He reports that strikers were 
making things lively in that section of the 
country. 

C. H. Sleichter, H. W. Crider and S. H. 
Stein, ex-members of the society, attended 
the anniversary exercises of the Clionian 
Literal Society on Thanksgiving Eve. 

S. P. Backastoe has also given us a call 
recently. 

At our recent election the following 
officers were chosen : President, J. H. 
Maysilles ; Vice-President, J. Yoe ; Re- 
cording Secretary, J. R. Wallace ; Cor- 
responding Secretary, C. B. Wingerd ; 
Organist, Howard Henry ; Critic, O. E. 
Good ; Chaplain, I. E. Albert ; Treasurer, 
W. E. Heilman ; Editor, D. S. Eshleman ; 
Janitor, Geo. Wallace. 



Clionian Literary Society. 



Virtute et Fide. 

Owing to various inconveniences the 
society has had no literal programme for 
several weeks, but expect to again resume 
their former line of work and hope to 
derive great benefits therefrom. 

Miss Flint, who has been confined to 
her bed for several days on account of 
sickness, is able to be about again. Dur- 
ing her illness, Misses Albertson and 
Loose took charge of her pupils. 

The name of Miss Emma Gingrich was 
lately added to our list of members. 

Miss Myra Albertson, Atlantic City, 
spent Thanksgiving with her sister. 

Miss Klinedinst enjoyed a visit from 
her mother and Mrs. Strayer, of York. 

Misses Grace and Virgie Light, Leb- 
anan, visited Miss Strickler, 30th ult. 

Among the former Clionians who visited 
us over Thanksgiving were Misses Burt- 
ner, '91, Roop, '92, Stehman, '93. 

We are always glad to welcome our 
friends and to feel that they are interested 
in our work here. May we receive many 
more such visits in the future. 



Personals and Locals. 

Miss Myra Albertson, of Alantic City, 
N. J., spent Thanksgiving with her sister. 



90 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



Mr. G. K. Hartman, '94, had been con- 
fined to his room with a severe cold the 
first week of the month. 

The humorous lecture by Walter Pel- 
ham on the 1st was excellent. He is 
without a rival in his facial expressions. 
"Whether willing or not, you could not re- 
frain from laughter. His representation 
of Artemus Ward was perfect. 

President Bierman was summoned to 
the bed-side of his father on the 4th inst. 
He has recovered sufficiently to be out of 
danger. 

The following ex-Clio's were in town 
over Thanksgiving : Misses Clara Baca- 
stow, Nettie Swartz, Laura Reider, Min- 
nie Burtner, Elvire Stehman, Delia Roop, 
Anna Gensemer. 

Rev. J. M. Mumraa, agent of the Col- 
lege, occupied the U. B. pulpit on Sunday, 
December 10th, morning and evening. 

A number of students and people of 
Annville availed themselves of the privi- 
lege of hearing Bishop Kephart's lecture 
on " What I saw at Pompeii and on Mt. 
Vesuvius, " on Thursday evening, the Tth 
inst, in the Memorial U. B. church at 
Lebanon. 

S. F. Huber. returned on Fridaj', the 
8th, from a business trip to Wilkes-Barre 
and Mauch Chunk. 

Rev. A. A. De Larme, of Norristown, 
Pa., visited friends at the College on 
Monday, the 11th inst. 

Among our many friends we were 
pleased to see Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Zear- 
ing, of Shiremanstown, Pa., on Thanks- 
giving. 

Harry Boyer has very creditably filled 
the pulpit of the U. B. Church at Swatara 
for several Sundays. 

As we go to press we look forward to a 
pleasant time at the Chocolataire to be 
given by the ladies on Saturday evening, 
December 16th. 

A large number of the students have 
lately been attacked by La Grippe. 

Horace W. Crider and Charles Sleichter 
were visiting W. H. Kreider over Thanks- 
giving. 

The Clioniaii Anniversary. 

On Wednesday afternoon already any 
casual observer could notice that some- 
thing out of the ordinary school routine 
was taking place at the College. All day 
Thursday (Thanksgiving) the young ladies 
seemed busy in making preparations for 
the one event of the year, to them as a 



society, namely, their twentieth anniver- 
sary. 

At an early hour on Thursday evening 
the chapel of the College was well filled 
with ex-members of the society and friends 
of the young ladies. All were eager for 
the exercises of the evening to begin and 
promptly at the appointed time the bril- 
liant piano quartette, " Siege de Corinth,"' 
was well played by Misses Loose, Saylor, 
Pennypacker and Stehman. This suc- 
ceeded in arresting the attention of every 
one and was a good beginning for the 
evening's entertainment. 

The President, Miss Wilson, then fol- 
lowed with an address of welcome in 
which she spoke of the inspiration given, 
to the Clios on these anniversarj^ occa- 
sions by the presence of so manj^ friends 
who feel an interest in the success of the 
society in general, as well as of each mem- 
ber individually. 

Then followed the invocation by Rev. 
H. B. Spayd, after which Miss Flint, the 
music teacher, rendered two very charm- 
ing vocal selections. The first one a 
" Lullaby," soft and subdued, and the 
second a very bright song, "Down the 
Shadowed Lane She Goes." The contrast 
in these two selections only served to 
bring out the beauty in each, and the ap- 
plause which greeted her showed that her 
singing was appreciated by the audience. 

Miss Mabel Saylor then discussed, in 
an essay, " The Perplexity of Nature,"' 
in an able and instructive manner. She 
convinced us that even in the natural 
world there is no death, but only trans- 
formation. 

The beautiful instrumental solo, "Whis- 
pering Winds," by Wollenhaupt, was ren- 
dered by Miss Ida Bowman. Her deli- 
cate touch and the expression given to 
the solo were very much admired. 

Then came the recitation — " Ginevra " — 
by Miss Albertson, the teacher of art and 
elocution. To say that this was well, 
given would be expressing it mildly. All 
who heard her could well see that she 
understands her art and the power of 
execution as well. 

Miss Anna Wilson then sang a selection 
from Gomes' Opera — " Salvator Rosa."' 
Miss Wilson's high notes were especially 
well clone. 

The Society motto— " Virtute et Fide"— 
was ably discussed by Miss Maggie 
Strickler. She showed that while fidelity 
between man and man is necessary; 



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t 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



91 



fidelity between man and God is a greater 
necessity, and proved that to reasonable 
beings infidelity to God is impossible if 
they allow themselves to be governed by 
the reasoning powers given them by their 
Creator. 

Miss Mellie Fortenbangh followed, in 
her very brilliant manner, with an instru- 
mental solo, after which the future of each 
member was predicted in a humorous man- 
ner by Miss Bowman, and the programme 
was completed with the singing of the 
Clionian Song by the Society. The words 
of this song were composed by Miss 
Sleichter, and were set to that favorite air 
" Rosalie." 

• After the rendering of the programme 
a reception was held in the Ladies' Hall 
from nine to eleven o'clock. This was 
attended by a great number of people and 
all were pleasantly entertained by the 
young ladies, who looked most charming 
in their light evening dresses. 

The dining room had been changed 
into a reception room and was decorated 
with the society colors, white and gold, 
with palms and potted plants, and pre- 
sented a very pretty appearance. 

Refreshments were served in the music 
room by Miss Albertson and Miss Bow- 
man, and consisted of grapes, cakes and 
cocoa. 

The evening was spent in conversation 
and many said this twentieth anniversary 
was one of the most successful ever held 
by the Clios. 



Oratorical Exercises. 

The members of the Senior Class of the 
College gave their first public exercise for 
the present year on Saturday evening last, 
November 25, and we are gratified to say 
that the unanimous opinion of those 
present was that each performer did him- 
self and the class credit. The music pre- 
pared for the occasion by Miss Flint was 
of a high order. Promptly at half-past 
seven o'clock President Bierman wel- 
comed the audience present in a few ap- 
propriate words after which the Rev. 
Mr. Spiyd of the TJ. B. Church led in 
prayer. 

Mr. D. S. Eshleman was the first speaker. 
He had chosen for his subject " The South 
American Problem," and in its discussion 
gave evidence that he had been reading 
the current of events of the past months 
to some purpose. He took the position 



that now was the opportune time for our 
own government to interfere and direct 
the turbulent forces in Brazil to the in- 
terest of civilization and God's cause and 
enforced his position by a clear and logical 
argument. 

Miss Anna E. Wilson discussed in a 
modest but very interesting and instruc- 
tive manner the subject of " Woman in 
Histo^." Referred to Mary, the mother 
of our Saviour, Queen Esther, and Queen 
Victoria of our day, as women who by de- 
votion to duty and high character won a 
place in history. Her voice is clear and 
sweet and her singing afterwards was 
much admired. 

Mr. George A. L. Kindt briefly reviewed 
the history of "The Crusades." While some 
contend that the ends attained by these 
cruel wars do not justify the barbarity 
practiced during their prosecution it is 
claimed by most historians now that the 
ultimate results promoted free thought, 
the liberty of the enslaved and the spread 
of general intelligence. The speaker by 
his incisive sentences held the attention 
of the audience to the end. 

Miss Maggie Strickler followed with an 
interesting discussion on " Woman in 
Modern Society." The advance of the 
American people in intelligence and the 
practice of the principles of the Christian 
religion has brought woman to the front 
in many of the reformatory measures of 
the day, and right royally does she hold 
her position and discharge her every duty. 
The speaker did unusually well on this 
occasion. 

Mr. George K. Hartman delivered an 
excellent oration on "Uncrowned Heroes." 
The world knows very little of its real 
heroes. The many noble deeds of charity, 
good-will, disinterested devotion and loy- 
alty in private life find no one to herald 
them abroad and weave crowns for de- 
serving heads. The faithful teacher, the 
devoted mother, the loyal citizen and con- 
stant friend were in turn discussed and 
their merits elucidated. The speaker won 
favor with the attentive audience as he 
progressed in his argument. 

Mr. James F. Zug had for his subject 
" Politics as a Career," and in its discus- 
sion had no flattering words for the as- 
pirant in politics who trims his sail to 
every wind of popular sentiment. The 
man whom the office seeks will as a rule 
serve his country best and win a useful 
career; the office seeker may never have 



mmm 



92 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



a career. The address was well arranged, 
well delivered and well received. 

Mr. William H. Kreider ably discussed 
" Unjust Class Legislation." The subject 
was in the line of the speaker's taste and 
thinking, and consequently won the atten- 
tion of the audience and evoked some of 
his best elements as a speaker. The inde- 
fensible position of our own country 
towards the Chinaman received special 
attention and criticism. This great nation 
cannot afford to engage much longer in 
the kind of legislation that has character- 
ized that relating to citizens of the Empire 
of the East. 

Mr. Oscar E. Good had a very logical 
and carefully prepared oration on " The 
Fugitive Slave Law," and during its de- 
livery held the undivided attention of the 
audience. The history of the slave power 
was reviewed, its unreasonable demands 
discussed and the ultimate effect of the 
law of 1850 upon the liberty loving people 
of our land fully brought before the 
hearer. 

Mi\ Samuel F. Huber followed with an 
eloquent and graphic description of " The 
Assault on Sumner," and the consequent 
uprising of the American people to crush 
this hydra-headed monster — slavery — and 
establish peace, virtue, liberty and inde- 
pendence. 

The preparation of these addresses in 
most cases required considerable reading 
and digesting of material, but the orators 
had for their reward the attention of an 
appreciative audience. — Annville Journal. 



Public Rhetorical Exercises. 

The first division of Prof. Deaner's 
rhetorical class appeared in public in the 
College chapel Saturday evening, Decem- 
ber 9lh. Considering the inclemency of the 
weather, the audience was large. Owing 
to sickness several members of the division 
were unable to perform. The music ren- 
dered by Misses Albertson, Black, Forten- 
baugh, Stehman and Pennypacker was of 
an enjoyable nature, and was very much 
appreciated by the audience and reflects 
credit upon the music department of the 
College. 

The literary part of the programme con- 
sisted of orations and essays, all of svhich 
showed evidence of careful research, and 
the delivery was in an oratical style which 
reflects great credit upon the professor 
and the class. 



The first production was an essay by- 
Miss Emily E. Loose, on "The Nine- 
teenth Century." In her clear, impressive 
style she reviewed the progress of science, 
invention and civilization in the Nine- 
teenth Century. 

In his characteristic eloquent style J. 
R. Wallace delivered an oration, the sub- 
ject of which was " Made, not Bestowed," 
in which he cited many prominent charac- 
ters in the world's history who had won 
their way to fame and fortune by their 
own unceasing efforts. 

In the review of Lalla Rookh, Miss 
Estella Stehman gave the story briefly, 
and her comments of criticism showed a 
careful study of the author. 

Mr. I. G. Hoerner, in his oration on 
" Political Cranks," portrayed the charac- 
ter of the assassins of Abraham Lincoln, 
Jas. A. Garfield, and the late Carter Har- 
rison ; his timely comments on these 
characters among others were much ap- 
preciated by the audience. 

The dissertation by J. H. Maysilles on 
" The Man of the Town-Meeting," showed 
a careful study of the life, character and 
influence of Samuel Adams, and how 
other great Americans did but defend the 
Union that he helped to create; that his 
name deserves to be placed second only 
to Washington's, and that when our civil 
institutions shall be traced to their true 
genesis the Boston town-meeting will be 
found to be the primordial cell ; and ex- 
alted above all others whose transcendent 
genius for politics held sway in this unit 
of our government will appear the name of 
Samuel Adams, " the man of the town- 
meetinar." 



Week of Prayer. 

The Forum had gone to press last month 
before our week of prayer closed. We were 
thus unable to give an account of the 
meetings, which may be of interest even 
at this late date. 

The meetings began with special services 
at the U. B. Church on Sunday evening, 
November 12, led by G. K. Hartman 
and followed by impressive talks by the 
following students : 

"Our Local Work," J. H. Maysilles; 
" Progress in Y. M. C. A. Work during 
the Past Year," S. F. Huber; "Our 
Young Men," D. S. Eshleman. 

A quintette composed of Prof. J. E. 
Lehman and Messrs. Eshleman, Beattie, 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



93 



Grood and Huber rendered some choice 
elections of music, after which the pastor, 
ev. Spayd, prenched a special sermon to 
ung men. 

The following were the topics and 
aders for the week : 

Monday, November 13, " Wrecked in 
arch of Gold," Rev. C. J. Kephart. 
Tuesday, November 14, "My House 
d How to Build it," D. S. Eshleman. 
Wednesday, November 15, "What is 
ost Worth Seeking," Rev. H. B. Spayd. 
Thursday, November 16, " Lord, I Will 
Follow Thee, But— " Rev. W. H. Lewars. 

Friday, November 17, " The Power of a 
Guilty Conscience," G. K. Hartman. 

Saturday, November 18," What Should 
a Man Give in Exchange for His Life," 
Gar man. 

Meetings were held during part of the 
following week, led by President and 
Mrs. Bierman, and S. F. Huber. 

The meetings throughout were very 
spiritual and well attended. Three pro- 
fessed faith in Christ and a number of 
others asked for the prayers of Christians, 
any of the students who had apparently 
own cold in the work were revived and 
1 have been led to a closer walk with 
hrist. 



The Book Reception. 

The book reception held by the Philo- 
smian Literary Society in its hall on 
riday evening, December 8th, was a suc- 
ss, both from a financial and literal 
ndpoint. A large number of valuable 
ooks were received, and others have ar- 
rived since the reception. Some friends 
have sent for lists of books desired by 
the society, which were gladly forwarded. 
A large number of contributions came in 
money, which added to the library fund 
will help to increase the large number of 
volumes already owned by the society. 

An interesting literary programme was 
rendered, mostly pertaining to libraries 
[books, reading, etc. Among the pro- 
Jductions was a dissertation by Prof*. J. 
|A. McDermad, on " Reading," which was 
classical and deserving great commenda- 
tion. 

Young Professor (playing tennis) — 
"Score, thirty love." Young Lady— 
"Pardon me, love thirty. You seem to 
get your loves in the wrong place." 
Young Prof, (sorrowfully) — " So I have 
always found." — Exchange. 



Pictures and Records of the Great Foot- 
ball Teams. 

The College Publishing Company, of 
1122 Broadway, New York, has issued a 
handsome booklet containing beautiful 
half-tone group pictures of the 1893 Foot- 
ball teams of Harvard, Princeton, Univer- 
sity of Pennsylvania and Yale and statis- 
tics and records of the individual plaj-ers. 
The booklet also contains fine half-tone 
plates of the Harvard and Yale 1893 crews 
and the athletic teams of Columbia, Har- 
vard, Princeton and Yale with statistics 
and records for the year. The players in 
the football groups are numbered so that 
by reference to the text each one's name 
can be ascertained. The pictures are 
4x6^ inches, printed on heavy plate paper 
6x9 inches, and altogether the booklet 
makes a most delightful and interesting 
souvenir of college athletics for the year 
1893. It will be sent post-paid on receipt 
of ten two-cent stamps. 



The Wonderful Progress of the Press. 

Some exceedinglv interesting and curi- 
ous facts are made plain by a recent 
compilation of the statistics of Ameri- 
can newspapers and other periodicals. 
The most striking point is the rapid 
growth of such publications, notwithstand- 
ing their previous enormous number and 
circulation. In the past year the in- 
crease in the United States and Canada, 
in the number periodicals issued, was 
1,613. This gain is more than nine per 
cent., or fully three times as high as the 
rate of increase in the population. And 
the tendency of the times, nevertheless, in 
the publication of newspapers and other 
periodicals, as in nearly every industry, 
is toward concentration in large concerns. 
What makes the addition of 1,613 pub- 
lications to the 17,760 already established 
the more remarkable is the fact that, at the 
lowest estimate of circulation, enough 
periodicals are published to furnish a 
monthly magazine in two families out of 
every three in the two countries, a daily 
paper to every second household, and 
two weeklies to almost as many families 
as there are in the United States and 
British North America. The total num- 
ber of single copies of periodicals issued 
is large enough to give every man, woman 
and child, from Mexico to the Arctic 
ocean, more than sixty papers or maga- 



zines in a year. The rapid swelling of 
such figures shows an insatiable demand 
for reading matter. The periodicals dis- 
place nothing. More books are made and 
sold than ever before, and more libraries 
exist to make one copy do the work of 
ten or a hundred. The age is hungry for 
information, and it will not be satisfied 
with any allowance of reading matter 
yet reached or even approached. — Cleve- 
land Leader and Herald. 



Prince Rupert's Drops. 

The most wondrous wonder of the 
glassmaker's art is the result of a philo- 
sophical experiment and is known to sci- 
entists as " Prince Rupert's Drop." These 
glass drops known by a Prince's name are 
simply the drippings of molten glass pear 
or tadpole shaped, there curious properties 
being the result of their being suddenly 
glazed and the pores covered by coming 
in contact with water when at a white 
heat. One of these " drops " can be re- 
moved from the water and smartly ham- 
mered upon the larger end without caus- 
ing a fracture, but if the smaller end has 
but the slightest atom clipped from its 
surface the whole object instantly bursts 
with explosive violence and disappears as 
fine dust. 

The theory of this phenomenon is that 
its particles when in fusion are in a state 
of repulsion, but upon being dropped in- 
to the water its superfices are annealed 
and the atoms return into the power of 
each other's attraction ,the inner particles, 
still in a state of repulsion, being confined 
within their outward covering. — St. Louis 
Republic 



Proper Breathing Movements. 

I think it is evident that the prorer 
development and expansion of the 
lungs by means of well regulated breath- 
ing must be regarded as of the greatest 
value in the prevention and in the treat- 
ment of the inactive stages of pulmonary 
consumption. The more simple the me- 
thod the more effective and practical will 
be the results which flow from it. Among 
the many exercises which are recom- 
mended for this purpose the following 
movements are very valuable. The arms, 
being used as levers, are swung backward 
as far as possible on a level with the 
shoulders during each inspiration and 
brought together in front on the same level 



during each expiration, or the hands are 
brought together above the head while in- 
spiring and gradually brought down along- 
side the body while expiring. A deep 
breath must be taken with each inspiration 
and held until the arms are gradually 
moved forward or downward, or longer in 
order to make both methods fully opera- 
tive. 

Another very serviceable chest exercise 
is to take a deep inspiration, and during 
expiration in a loud voice count or sing as 
loud as possible. A male person with a 
good chest capacity can count up to 60 or 
80, while in a female, even with good 
lungs, this power is somewhat reduced. 
Practice of this sort will slowly develop 
the lungs, and the increased ability to 
count longer is a measure of the improve- 
ment going on within the chest. Or, again, 
the taking of six or eight full and deep 
breaths in succession every hour during 
the da}', either while sitting at work or 
while walking out in the open air, will 
have a very beneficial effect. — Dr. Thomas 
J. Mays in Century. 



A little girl was sitting on her father's 
lap. The child was beautiful, but the 
father was extremely plain. The child 
held a mirror in her hand, and ever and 
anon glanced into it and then looked at 
her father. At last she said, " Papa, did 
God make me ?" " Yes," said the father. 
"And did God make you too, papa ?" 
"Yes, God made me too," said the father. 
"Well," said the little girl, "he does bet- 
ter work lately, don't he papa?" — Ex- 
change. 



ROOFING. 

GUM-ELASTIC ROOFING FELT costs 
only $2-00 per ioo square feet. Makes a 
good roof for years and anyone can put it on. 

GUM-ELASTIC PAINT costs only 6o cents 
per gal. in bbl. lots, or $4.50 for 5-gal. tubs. 
Color dark red. Will stop leaks in tin or iron 
roofs that will last for years. TRY IT. 

Send stamp for samples and full particulars. 

GUM ELASTIC ROOFING CO. 
39 and 41 W. Broadway, New York. 

AGENTS WANTED. 



$10 and $20, Genuine Confederate Bills 
Jonly five cents each ; $50 and $100 bills 
10 cents each ; 25c and 50c shinplasters 10 
cents each ; $1 and $2 bills 25 cents each. Sent 
securely sealed on receipt of price. Address, 
Chas. D. Barker, 90 S. Forsyth St., At- 
lanta, Ga. 



$5 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



CUMBERLAND VALLEY" RAILROAD. 

TIMETABLE— Oct. 1, 1893. 



Down Trains. 



Lv. Winchester 

" Martinsburg . ... 

' Hagerstowii 

" Greencastle 

" Chamhersburg .. 

" Shippensburg 

" Newville 

" Carlisle 

Mechauicsburg.. 

Dillsburg 

Harrisburg 



Ar. 



Philadelphia.. 

New York 

Baltimore 



C'bg 
Acc. 



6 10 
6 32 

6 53 

7 18 
7 42 



8 03 

11 25 
2 03 
11 15 



Ky'e 
Exp 



Mr'g| Day 
Mail Exp 

No. 4 No. 6 



A. M. 

615 
7 00 

7 40 

8 09 
8 30 

8 55 

9 15 
9 40 

10 04 



10 25 

1 25 
4 03 
3 10 
p. M. 



1 25 
4 03 
3 10 



11 25 

11 48 

12 08 
12 30 
12 50 

1 15 
1 40 



2 00 

6 50 
9 38 
6 45 
P. M. 



Ev'g 
Mail 



No. 8 



P. M. 

2 30 

3 20 

4 10 

4 36 

5 00 
5 30 

5 51 

6 17 
6 43 



7 05 

11 15 
3 50 
10 40 
P. M. 



3 20 

4 50 

7 10 
736 

8 00 
8 16 

8 53 

9 20 



10 05 

A. M. 

4 30 
7 33 
6 20 

AM. 



Additional trains will leave Carlisle daily except Sunday at 
5:55 a. m., 7:68 a. m., 3:40 p. m., stopping at all intermediate 
stations, arriving at Harrisburg at 6:40 a. m., 8:03 a. m., 4:30 
p. m. 

Evening Mail runs daily between Harrisburg and Cham 
bersbujg. 



Up Trains. 



Lv. Baltimore 

" New York.. .. 
" Philadelphia.. 



" Harrisburg 

" Dillsburg 

" Mechanicsburg . 

" Carlisle 

" Newville 

" Shippensburg .... 

" Chambersburg.. 

" Greencastle 

" Hagerstown 

" Martinsburg 

Ar. Winchester 



Win 


Me's 


Hag 


Ev'g 


C'bg 


N. O. 


Acc. 


Exp 


Acc. 


Mail 


Acc. 


Exp- 


No. 1 


No. 3 


No. 5 No. 7 


No.17 


No. 9 


P. M. 


A. M. 


A. M. 


A. M. 


P. M. 


P. M. 


11 40 


4 45 


8 53 


11 20 


2 15 


4 23 


8 00 


12 15 




9 00 


2 00 


2 06 


11 20 


4 30 


8 50 


11 50 


2 20 


4 30 


A. M. 


A. M. 


P. M. 


P. M. 


P. M. 


P. M. 


4 40 


7 53 


12 40 


3 40 


5 20 


8 00 


5 03 


8 13 


103 


4 01 


5 41 


820 


5 30 


8 36 


1 29 


4 25 


6 05 


8 44 


5 55 


9 00 


1 52 


4 55 


6 36 


9 08 


6 15 


9 21 


2 13 


5 10 


6 57 


9 29 


6 40 


9 43 


2 35 


5 35 


720 


9 50 


7 02 


10 04 


3 01 


5 50 




10 12 


725 


10 27 


3 25 


6 18 




10 35 


9 30 


11 12 




7 02 






11 00 


12 00 




7 50 






A. M. 


A. M. 


P. M. 


P. M. 


P. M. 


A. M. 



Additional trains will leave Harrisburg daily except Sunday 
at 10:35 a. m.. 10:45 p. m., arriving at Carlisle at 11:20 a. m., 
11:30 p. m., stopping at all intermediate stations ; additional 
train will leave Hagerstown at 8:00 a. m.. arriving at 11:00 
a. m., stopping at all i> termediate stations. 

Pullman Palace Sleeping Cars between Hagerstown and New 
York on Keystone Express and Night Express east, and on 
Memphis Express and New Orleans Express west. 

Pullman Sleeping Cars on Night Express and New Orleans 
Express between Philadelphia and New Orleans. 

IF you wish to advertise anything anywhere at any time, 
write to GEO. P. ROWELL & Co., No. 10 Spruce Street, 
New York. 



EVERY one in need if information on the subject of ad- 
vertising will do well to obtain a copy of "Book for 
Advertisers, 1 ' 368 pages, price one dollar. Mailed, postage 
paid, on receipt of price. Contains a careful compilation from 
the American Newspaper Directory of all the best papers 
and class journals; gives the circulation rating of every one, 
and a good deal of information about rates and other matters 
pertaining to the business of advertising. Address HOW- 
ELL'S ADVERTISING BUREAU, 10 Spruce Street, New 
York. . 




"Everybody's Law Book," 

Is the title of the new 768 page work now in press, 
prepared by J. Alexander Koones, L L. B., member 
of the New York Bar. 

It enables every man and woman to be their own 
lawyer. It teaches what are your rights and how to 
maintain them. When to begin a law suit and when 
to shun one. It contains the useful information 
every business man needs in every State in the Un- 
ion. It contains business forms of every variety 
useful to the lawyer as well as to all who have legal 
business to transact. 

Inclose two dollars for a copy, or inclose two-cent 
postage stamp for a tanlwof contents and terms to 
agents. Address BEN J. VV. HITCHCOCK, Pub- 
lisher, 385 Sixth Avenue, New York. 



W. F, BECKER. J. P. BRUGGER' 

-~^-S-& TZECE 

Eastern Book Store, 

315 Market St., Harrisburg, Pa. 
BOOKS AND STATION JEM Y, 

Special Kates to Students. 

WW Second-Hand School Books a Specialty. 

WRITE FOK PRICES. 



J 



L. SAYLOR & SONS, 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

CARRIAGES, 

LIGHT BUGGIES, PONY PHAETONS, ETC. 
STRICTLY FIRST CLASS. 

Shops Opposite Eagle Hotel, ANNVILLE, PA 



E. 



B. MARSHALL, M. D., 

No. 34 East Main Street, 

ANNVILLE, PA. 



ISAAC MANN & SON, 



THE 



LARGEST CLOTHIERS, 

834 Cumberland Street, 

LEBANON, PA. 

THE BEST GOODS EOR THE LEAST MONEY. 



J 



R. McCAULY, 



DAILY MEAT MARKET. 

GOOD MEAT. LOW PRICES. ANNVILLE, FA.. 



J 



OHN TRUMP, 
BOOT AND SHOE MAKEB, 

ANNVILLE, PA. 



WS. SEABOLD, 
. DEALER IN 

Drugs, Medicines, Perfumery and Toilet Articles 

No. 2 East Main St., Annville, Pa. 



J. 



S. KENDIG, 

BAKERY. 

Next Door to Eagle Hotel, Annville, Pa. 



w 



J. KIEFER, M. D., 

Homeopathic physician and surgeon. 

76 West Main St., Annville, Pa. 



T\EXTER LIVERY AND BOARDING STABLE 

RAILROAD ST., ANNVILLE, PA. 

PROP'R 

GOOD TEAMS AT REASONABLE BATES. 



R. A. MAULFAIR, 



96 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



D 



"YyiLLIAM KIEBLER, 

SHA VING AND HAIR DRESSING, 

Eagle Hotel Barber Shop, Annville, Pa. 

ADAM B. HESS, 
OFFICE AT THE HOTEL EAGLE. 
OMNIBUS TO ALL TRAINS. 
ANNVILLE, PA. 

JACOB SARGENT, 
FASHIONABLE TAILOR, 

18 and 20 Main St., Annville, Pa. 

RY GOODS, NOTIONS, GRO- 
CERIES, BOOTS and SHOES, 

—AND — 

GENTS' FURNISHING GOODS. 

ANNVILLE, PA. 

A C. M. HEISTER, 

STATIONERY JOB PRINTER, 

Visiting Cards a Specialty. 

35 S. White Oak Street - - Annville, Pa. 

WILLIAM WALTZ, 
FASHIONABLE 

HAIR CUTTING AND SHAVING SALOON, 

West Main Street, Annville, Pa. 
H. H. KREIDER. JXO. E. HE Kit. 

KREIDER & CO., 
DEALERS IN ALL KINDS OP 

Hard & Soft Coal, Grain, Seeds Salt & Feed. 

Office : Railroad Street, near Depot, 
Telephone Connection. AX.WILLE, PA. 

THE BEST STOCK, THE LOWEST 
PRICES IN 

FURNITURE , j s e phT a mTTl e r • s . 

ANNVILLE, PA. 

M, H. SHAUD, 

DEALER IN 

Gold Watches and Jewelry, 

Wholesale and Retail Dealer in 

FINE CANDIES AND FRUITS. 

Families and Entertainments Supplied with OYS 
TERS AND CREAM. ANMglLLE. PA." 

S. M. SHEIKS BAKERY, 

HAS ALWAYS ON HAND 

FRESH BREAD, CAKES AND ROLLS, 

One Door West Penn'a House, Annville. 
S. 23. WAGNER, 

— ,>>■ Headquarters t or -v - — 
GROCERIES, CONFECTIONERIES 

OYSTERS, FRUITS AND NUTS. 

Restaurant Attached. Meals at All Hours 

12 West Main Street, Annville, Pa. 



If yon wait to Buy a Hat rignt, and a right Hat, or anything m 
Men's Furnishings, 

GO TO 

SUCCESSORS to RAITT & Co., 
Eighth and Cumberland Sts., Lebanon, Pa. 

ANNVILLE, PA., 

Dealers in Dry Goods, Notions 

and Ladies' Dress Goods. 

Men's Suitings we make a Specialty. Home-made, 
Ingrain and Brussels Carpets. You buy Cheaper 
from us than away from home, and have a large 
stock to select from. 

TECE 

U.B. MUTUAL AID SOCIETY 

OF PENNSYLVANIA. 

HOME OFFICE, LEBANON, PENNA. 

Chartered by the State Legislature, March 11, 1809. 
Positive amounts guaranteed and claims paid in 
full. 

Benefits of $1000 insurance secured for $S.' 1 0. 
Reciprocal Circle Insurance,new and very popular. 

Invested Assets $146,809.94 

Contingent Assets 116,970.00 

Assessment Basis 5,295,000.00 

Death Losses Paid 6,774,123.01 

THE J?TjA.N. 

The payment of EIGHT DOLLARS on application, 
FIVE DOLLARS annually for four years, and there- 
after TWO DOLLARS annually during life, with 
pro rata mortality assessments for each death of a 
member insured for $1000, is as follows: 



Age. 


Ass't 


Age. 


Ass'mt 


Age. 


Ass'mt 


20 


65 


30 


75 


40 


90 


21 


66 


31 


77 


41 


92 


22 


67 


32 


79 


42 


94 


23 


68 


33 


81 


43 


96 


24 


69 


34 


83 


44 


98 


25 


70 


35 


85 


45 


1 01) 


26 


71 


36 


86 


46 


1 06 


27 


72 


37 


87 


47 


1 12 


28 


73 


38 


88 


48 


1 18 


29 


74 


39 


89 


49 


1 24 



Age. 



50 
51 

52 
53 
51 
55 
66 



Assm't 



1 30 
1 40 
1 59 
1 60 
1 70 
1 80 
1 



92 



This will entitle a member to a certificate of $1000 
to be paid after death to the legal beneficiary, when- 
ever such death may occur. 

Reliable Agents Wanted Everywhere. 



CHOICE BEEF, LAMB, VEAL, FORK AND 
TONGUES at 

Maulfair's Daily Meat Market, 

ANNVILLE, PA.